Questions tagged [quantifiers]

For questions about words that give information about the quantity or amount of something.

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do [the/some] online banking vs. do [the/some] grocery shopping

In the following phrases, is it optional to include the bracketed part? do [the/some] online banking do [the/some] grocery shopping
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Which quantifier is correct: much of our cities, most of our cities, or many of our cities? [closed]

Which phrase is correct: much of our cities, most of our cities, or many of our cities?
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Plural quantifying expression + "of" + uncountable noun – which verb form?

Consider the following NPs: 500 years of history 100 liters of milk 300 grams of apple pie When used as subjects in full clauses, which verb form do these NPs take – singular or plural verb? Am I ...
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a ban on going to these places

a. You say there is a ban on going to some of the countries on this list. I think there's a ban on going to any of the countries on this list. b. You say there is a ban on going to some of the ...
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'some respect for myself': What does it mean?

I have recently heard of the sentence 'I have some respect for myself'. What is the difference between this sentence and another one 'I respect myself'? Is it a matter of degree of respect? Thanks for ...
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such little amount of sleep

a. You won't be able to perform well with that little sleep. a1. You won't be able to perform well with such little sleep. (that small amount of sleep) b. You want to sleep five hours a night. That ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Which quantifier should I use? [duplicate]

Are these two sentences equivalent? Are they both correct? "There are a little more than 1,000 inhabitants." "There are a few more than 1,000 inhabitants."
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'a few too many' and Quantifiers before Adverbs

I have a few too many cloves of garlic in the tomato sauce. 1. I can't understand the meaning as how can something be 'a few' and 'too many' at the same time? 2. And, I found this sentence on a ...
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Can I modify a quantifier with “not”?

There’s a 2/3 apple. There’s a not whole (=incomplete) apple. There’s a not half apple. Are these two sentences acceptable?
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2 votes
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half goat and half sheep

a.) This animal is half goat and half sheep. b.) This animal looks half like a goat and half like a sheep. In sentence a, half does not need to be followed by an indefinite article, does it? But why?...
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10 votes
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Which of no, none, any, some would fit in "few of the students knew ___ of the answers"?

A friend of mine recently had a test during one of her English classes and there was a task to choose the correct word that best fits the sentence: "Few of the students knew ___ of the answers&...
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can do it in any manner

a. I can do it in any manner. I think that means that I can do it in all possible ways. b, I doubt you can do it in any manner. It seems to me that (b) is ambiguous. It could mean I doubt you can do ...
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"some customers" referring to a particular group of people

I am wondering if "some customers" can refer to a specific group of people at the restaurant in the following context. Does it need to be changed into "Some of the customers" or &...
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7 votes
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Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

a. My sons almost don't talk to each other. b. My sons almost never talk to each other. Are both of the above sentences grammatically correct and do they mean the same? I use (b). (a) sounds a bit ...
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(very) few and negative polarity items

The negative polarity item ever normally occurs with interrogative or negative sentences: a. *John has ever been to Japan. (unacceptable) b. Has John ever been to Japan? (acceptable) Now consider ...
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2 votes
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What is the grammatical function of 'all' in 'noun + all'?

The people all wanted a new leader. In the above example, what is the grammatical function of all? Is it an inversion of 'all of the people' or 'all the people'? Or is it something else entirely? I ...
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Quantifiers: Each and every when combining with '' different''

I know that there are differences between '' each'' and ''every'' and they are sometimes used interchangeably, and I have no problem choosing which one to use in daily conversations. However, I came ...
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any of the fruits

a. I can eat almost all the fruits on that table. b. I can eat almost every one of the fruits on that table. c. I can eat almost any of the fruits on that table. a1. I can eat almost all the fruits ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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some . . . some . . . still some

Are all the following combinations of quantifiers correct? a. People have different skin colors. Some are yellow, some are white, and some are black. b. People have different skin colors. Some are ...
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won't do it under any conditions

Which is correct: I won't work for you under just any conditions simply to make ends meet. Some requirements will have to be met regarding the workplace before I start work. I won't work for you ...
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2 answers
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Can I say “1kg of watermelons”

There are three watermelons, and each watermelon weighs 1kg. In this case, can I say “there are 1kg of watermelons”?
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A singular verb comes after "any of [plural noun]", or a plural one?

In some English text it is said that we should use a singular verb in the following example: Any of the computers needs updating. However, it is said that in the following examples we should use ...
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someone/some people

a. I had to publish those documents so that someone would believe me. b. I had to publish those documents so that some people would believe me. I think in (a) nobody believed me before I published ...
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Can “half an approximate hour” mean 27~29 minutes? [closed]

Can “half an approximate hour” mean 27~29 minutes? I want to know “approximate” is distinguished from “half.”
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Should it be considered as a prepositional phrase or a determiner? [duplicate]

He drank half of a half gallon of milk. Should I divide it into ‘of a half gallon’ and ‘of milk,’ or should I divide it into ‘half of’ and ‘a half gallon of’?
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a small amount of money

a. I had a small amount of money. That could mean I had a little money. but could it also mean I had little money. ? I think it could. I think the way the words are emphasized will change the ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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as little sensitive as possible

a. I gave them as little sensitive information as possible. Can't that sentence be read in two ways? I think little could be modifying sensitive or information, so I see two possible readings: The ...
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2 answers
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Does ‘much noise’ have two meanings?

Can "much noise" not only mean "very noisy" but also "many noises", such as bird noise, people noise and car noise?
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1 vote
1 answer
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What type of adjective is little? Descriptive or quantitative?

Consider the following sentence. We should pay little attention to little things in life. What type of adjective is little in this sentence? I am confused if it is descriptive or quantitative. What ...
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Could it be correct to say "very little people attended the event"?"

I know 'little' is for uncountable nouns and 'people' is a countable noun. But, could it work as the noun 'hair'? When the quantity is way too big to be counted, it's considered uncountable, or does '...
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know what he did to some

a. Do you know what he said to some people in my neighborhood? b. I want to know what he said to some people in your neighborhood, because they've started hating me. c. Do you know what he did to ...
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1 vote
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those who or whom?

Which one is grammatically correct, or better? Very few of those who do not speak english are promoted to managerial positions. Very few of whom do not speak english are promoted to managerial ...
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1 vote
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a lot to eat/much to eat

a. All we have is two cans of beans. It isn't a lot to eat, but it will have to do for now. b. All we have is two cans of beans. It isn't much to eat, but it will have to do for now. Are the above ...
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0 votes
2 answers
80 views

Use of "Much", "Many" and "More" in English

In the example below, I used more and much both but I can't understand the proper use-case for more, much, and many. Sometimes, it confuses that in which scenario which one is a perfect match for it. ...
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1 answer
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have no experience

a. Each of these drinks have no calories. b. Each of these workers have no experience. Are the sentences grammatically correct? Are they natural?
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6 votes
1 answer
103 views

Why is it "half as much" and not "a half as much"?

Why is it acceptable to say "It is half as much" but not "It is a half as much" When you can say: "It is a third as much" but not "It is third as much" What is ...
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1 answer
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enough lawyers' files

a. If you examine enough of our lawyers' files, you'll get a pretty good idea of how the legal system works. b. If you examine enough lawyers' files, you'll get a pretty good idea of how the legal ...
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3 votes
1 answer
208 views

I'm unsure if the use of "a lot of" in this sentence is correct

A friend of mine asked me to take a look at his essay, and analyze it for any mistakes. It was overall pretty good, but there was one sentence which got stuck in my mind. I left it out as correct, but ...
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1 answer
69 views

How to use "a" or "any" in a question with "is / are there?"

Is there a difference in meaning and if so which one between: "Is there A teacher's desk in your classroom?" and "Is there ANY teacher's desk in your classroom?" and between: "...
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How to use "any" in a question with "have"?

In a class situation, with a student asking another for coloured pencils, what is the difference in meaning between: "Do you have coloured pencils?" and "Do you have ANY coloured ...
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"any of them" vs "either of them"

Aren't "any" and "either" both correct in no.89? We looked at two hotels on the internet and ……… of them would be great for a holiday. (a) all (b) every (c) either (d) any ...
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3 answers
509 views

Which pronoun should I use after "lots of paper"? ("it" v "them")

Does this sentence sound grammatically correct? He used lots of paper and cut them into different sizes. Or should I use it instead?
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2 votes
2 answers
928 views

One vs. single (when we talk about amount)

When we talk about amount, which word is more correct, "one" or "single"? Remember, you should do it in one step, not multiple ones. Remember, you should do it in a single step, ...
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0 answers
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Few people vs Some people [duplicate]

I got a sentence where I was asked to correct/improve it by choosing one of the given options. I was sure of using "Few" instead of "Some" with people but it turned out that I was ...
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1 vote
1 answer
53 views

scarcely any or scarcely the?

In the following sentence from Frankenstein, the definite article "the" cannot be replaced by "any." Could anyone provide a logical explanation, please? Last Monday (July 31st), ...
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scarcely leaving me any/the room

I'd like to know whether "the" or "any" should be used in the following: The porky fellow came into the cubicle, scarcely leaving me any/the room in which I was standing. I'd appreciate your help.
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there is/ are loads of things you can buy

According to this website, a lot of, lots of, a load of and loads of take a singular verb if they refer to an amount of something uncountable and a plural verb if they are followed by a plural ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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A question about tenses and quantifiers

I have done all my homework = There is no more homework to be done. I am tired because i have done a lot of homework. "a lot" is a quantity, which requires present perfect simple. Is it possible to ...
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0 votes
2 answers
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Quantity expression in sentence

Which one is correct grammatical? Give me 5 kg of Sugar. Give me 5 kg Sugar. What is the difference between above sentences?
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0 answers
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Part of speech of "one half" in "one half a number plus three is five"

I thought it should be "one half of a number" but it seems one half a number" is the preferred way of saying this. Why? Is it incorrect to use "of" here? Does the same apply to an actual number such ...
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