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Questions tagged [quantifiers]

For questions about words that give information about the quantity or amount of something.

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sings here only on Saturdays

a. He sings here only on Saturdays. Does that mean that he sings here every Saturday? b. He only doesn't practice on Sundays. Does that mean that he never practices on Sundays? Many thanks
azz's user avatar
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23 votes
11 answers
7k views

In the sentence "She says she has no friends," the number of friends is zero, why is "friends" still plural?

In the sentence "She says she has no friends" even though the number of friends is zero (less than two), why is "friends" still plural? I learnt the rule that if a countable noun ...
Flower Power's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
20 views

you both talked to him during many a dinner party

a. You have both talked to him during many a party. b. They have all talked to him during many a party. c. You have both talked to him during many parties. d. They have all talked to him during many ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
51 views

"The few houses she owns": does it imply too small a number?

a. The few houses she owns are big. b. Those few houses she has renovated are very expensive. c. The small number of houses she owns are big. Do these sentences imply that she has few houses? In other ...
azz's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
111 views

"Only a few people" or "only few people"?

Can you help me with this question pleas? The concert wasn't popular. Only ____ people came. How should I complete the sentence, with a few or few?
Meral Üçok Atasoy's user avatar
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2 answers
42 views

the key to all the doors of knowledge

a. He has a key to all doors of knowledge. b. He has a key to every door of knowledge. c. He has a key to each door of knowledge. d. He has a key to all the doors of knowledge. ============ a1. He has ...
azz's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
69 views

Is the definite article 'the' necessary in phrases like 'neither of the cats'?

When I want to say neither of the cats either of the cats none of the cats half the cats a lot of the cats most of the cats each of the cats every one of the cats all the cats That 'the' is ...
train bee 282's user avatar
-3 votes
2 answers
86 views

Rank quantifiers based on intensity [closed]

Is there any ranking for quantifiers based on intensity (pretty, quite, very, etc..) in English?
Ommo's user avatar
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1 answer
33 views

where he could find any cigarettes

a. He wanted to know where he could find any cigarettes. b. He wanted to know where there were any cigarettes. Would you say that the sentences sort of imply scarcity and he'd be happy if he could ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
35 views

About the use of other quantifiers instead of ‘much’ , ‘many’, ‘few’, ‘little’, etc [closed]

I was always told that the use of many/few/fewer is for countable nouns and the use of much/little/less is for uncountable nouns. But what happens if I want to use other words to specify quantity? Can ...
tac's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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the whereabouts of any given employee

a. I don't know the whereabouts of any given employee at any given time. Does that mean I am not suppose to know the whereabouts of any given employee at any given time. or I have no idea where any ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
31 views

I'd risk my life for any of you

a. I risked my life for Jeff, and I want you to know that I'd risk my life for every one of you. b. I risked my life for Jeff, and I want you to know that I'd risk my life for each of you. c. I risked ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
30 views

most of them entered the building

a. Most of the students entered the building but Tom, Pete and Hank didn't. b. Some of the students entered the building but Tom, Pete and Hank didn't. Would you say that Tom, Pete and Hank were the ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
37 views

We both vs both of us

The book "Practical English Usage" by Michael Swan, page 155, contains the following guidance: I wonder if instead of an object pronoun we had a subject pronoun, would be possible to use to ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
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4 answers
116 views

Which one is correct: "one more book than" or "one more books than"?

Prerequisite:Mr.Smith has 30 books and Ms.Smith has 31 books. Which is correct? A. Ms.Smith has one more book than Mr.Smith. B. Ms.Smith has one more books than Mr.Smith.
Ran's user avatar
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2 answers
96 views

doing [determiner] grocery shopping

Pedagogical materials commonly advise adding a determiner or quantity word to "do [the/one's/some] Ving." However, in the following passage, "doing grocery shopping" does not have ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
29 views

Quantifier + proper name

How should I use QUANTIFIERS with PROPER NOUNS? What's the proper form? e.G: Each of Johnson's cars has one different color. Some of Carl's cattle heads have no pedigree. All of Ryder's companies ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
90 views

Whole VS Whole of with common nouns

What is the difference between "the whole of + noun" and "the whole + noun"? They pretty much mean the same to me. E.G.: Original: But, on St. Thomas’ view, my typing of this ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

All vs Whole with singular nouns: Which should I choose?

Which should I choose when there's a singular countable noun? e.G.: My whole youtube channel was made thinking about recording Snes gameplays. All my youtube channel was made thinking about ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
31 views

thought little of them

Take note of the following sentence: Paul Newman himself thought little of them. [1] In this sentence, is "little" modifying the verb " thought" as an adverb or there's something ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
277 views

The usage of "little" versus "a little"

I was taught that "little" is the negative form of "a little" [1] [2] [3]. So why don't we use "little" in these sentences? : I'm a little confused. I'm a little ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
32 views

they send invitations to

a. I got an invitation from their company and thought they really liked me. Then I found out that they send invitations to anyone. b. The fact that you received samples of their chocolates doesn't ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
682 views

The most time VS Most time

Please, read the following sentences: Mary's father spends most (of the) time in the mill, where he works with his brother, Mario. Mary's father spends the most time in the mill, where he works with ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
209 views

Some advice vs. advice vs. a piece of advice vs. any advice

What are the differences, in terms of the amount of advice asked for, between the following questions: Can you give me advice? Can you give me some advice? Can you give me a piece of advice? Can you ...
A Slow Learner's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
46 views

"too heavily" vs "heavily enough"

It had been snowing too heavily for me to leave the house. Use enough: It had been snowing heavily enough for me to stay indoors. Source: The Communicative Grammar of English Workbook - Page 14 Why ...
Ahmad Mohammad's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
27 views

anyone here works hard

a. Anyone here works hard to make a living. b. Anyone here uses his brains to make a living. c. Anyone here makes a living by using their intelligence. Are the above sentences grammatically correct ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
23 views

anyone with a criminal record

a. Anyone with a criminal record cannot apply for this job. b. Anybody who is Tom's friend cannot be trusted. Are the above sentences grammatical and meaningful? I tend to use 'nobody who... can...' ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
118 views

(...) and neither are/is they?

Although it is widely disseminated that "neither", as well as "either" is singular, I bring you the following sentence: I'm not a good person, and neither is they. I don't know ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
236 views

Each have or Have each

Good day, people. The question aims to elucidate the correct position of "EACH" in relation to the following sentences: What is the correct order? They have each won University Challenge on ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
35 views

No; not any; not a;

Good morning, people. I know there are some related posts, but they don't answer my many questions. All ELL and other forum links are purple. Believe me, hahaha. 1 - In questions/negative questions, ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
360 views

None, none of: usage

Today I come with some new doubts about the more specific use of "none", ahaha. 1- Is none of also a pronoun or just a determiner? E.g: I had many cars while young. But none of my brothers ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
71 views

None meaning nobody

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, we do not use "none" with the meaning of "no one/nobody". I have a lot of sporty friends. Some of them play football, but none ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
72 views

Is it possible to use quantifiers with proper nouns?

As far as I know, we always use quantifiers before nouns. From this I would like to know if the following constructions, with PROPER NOUNS, sound grammatically correct. If not, an explanation is most ...
Portugueseporto's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

"they'd"/"there'd" be too much of "a distraction"/"distraction"?

What sentence is correct? 1 They'd be too much of a distraction. 2 They'd be too much of distraction. 3 There'd be too much of a distraction. 4 There'd be too much of distraction.
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
31 views

each of us might get fired [closed]

a. Each of us might get fired tomorrow. b. We might each get fired tomorrow. ================ c. All of us might get fired tomorrow. d. We might all get fired tomorrow. =================== e. Every ...
azz's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
1k views

there was/were a number of

All examples are mine. They arose as a result of my interest: whether we must always use verbs in the plural form when these verbs agree with "a (...) number of + noun". My first example: (...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,755
0 votes
2 answers
685 views

Is "There is lots of..." wrong?

I'm aware of these phrases that people usually use: A lot of... Lots of... A load of... Loads of... And I would think those phrases are interchangeably used without changing the meaning or something,...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,012
-1 votes
1 answer
336 views

take some pictures or take few pictures

hello english community I am a new English learner and new user of stack exchange too. I am confused in the following sentence :- Jane wanted a camera to take _________ pictures of her friends on ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

do [the/some] online banking vs. do [the/some] grocery shopping

In the following phrases, is it optional to include the bracketed part? do [the/some] online banking do [the/some] grocery shopping
Apollyon's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
103 views

Plural quantifying expression + "of" + uncountable noun – which verb form?

Consider the following NPs: 500 years of history 100 liters of milk 300 grams of apple pie When used as subjects in full clauses, which verb form do these NPs take – singular or plural verb? Am I ...
Lillatanten's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

a ban on going to these places

a. You say there is a ban on going to some of the countries on this list. I think there's a ban on going to any of the countries on this list. b. You say there is a ban on going to some of the ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

'some respect for myself': What does it mean?

I have recently heard of the sentence 'I have some respect for myself'. What is the difference between this sentence and another one 'I respect myself'? Is it a matter of degree of respect? Thanks for ...
Chet's user avatar
  • 5
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

such little amount of sleep

a. You won't be able to perform well with that little sleep. a1. You won't be able to perform well with such little sleep. (that small amount of sleep) b. You want to sleep five hours a night. That ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Which quantifier should I use? [duplicate]

Are these two sentences equivalent? Are they both correct? "There are a little more than 1,000 inhabitants." "There are a few more than 1,000 inhabitants."
zenith3's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
103 views

'a few too many' and Quantifiers before Adverbs

I have a few too many cloves of garlic in the tomato sauce. 1. I can't understand the meaning as how can something be 'a few' and 'too many' at the same time? 2. And, I found this sentence on a ...
RADS's user avatar
  • 509
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

Can I modify a quantifier with “not”?

There’s a 2/3 apple. There’s a not whole (=incomplete) apple. There’s a not half apple. Are these two sentences acceptable?
user09827's user avatar
  • 305
2 votes
1 answer
93 views

half goat and half sheep

a.) This animal is half goat and half sheep. b.) This animal looks half like a goat and half like a sheep. In sentence a, half does not need to be followed by an indefinite article, does it? But why?...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,996
10 votes
5 answers
2k views

Which of no, none, any, some would fit in "few of the students knew ___ of the answers"?

A friend of mine recently had a test during one of her English classes and there was a task to choose the correct word that best fits the sentence: "Few of the students knew ___ of the answers&...
Artem's user avatar
  • 101
1 vote
1 answer
40 views

"some customers" referring to a particular group of people

I am wondering if "some customers" can refer to a specific group of people at the restaurant in the following context. Does it need to be changed into "Some of the customers" or &...
Apollyon's user avatar
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7 votes
5 answers
1k views

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

a. My sons almost don't talk to each other. b. My sons almost never talk to each other. Are both of the above sentences grammatically correct and do they mean the same? I use (b). (a) sounds a bit ...
azz's user avatar
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