Questions tagged [reduced-relative-clauses]

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taste or smell like (that of) a lemon

Sour things have a sharp, sometimes unpleasant, taste or smell like a lemon. Sour things have a sharp, sometimes unpleasant, taste or smell like that of a lemon. ("that"= the taste or smell)...
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Question about Reduced Clause

How to use reduce or enhance the following sentences? You shouldn't take that drug and you shouldn't see it as a cure. Apple who has a lion share of smartphone market is now forcing customer to pay ...
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Are these sentences correct: Having illness, I've to go to the hospital every week. Having fair skin, I've to stay away from the sun

I learned that present participles can be used to express why something happens, example: Being a man, I shave everyday. However, I noticed that in describing physical features it's better to avoid ...
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Reduced Relative Clauses which modify an object of the verb

a- I gave a book, which was written by Hemingway, to Mary last week. b- I gave a book, written by Hemingway, to Mary last week. As far as I know I can reduce the sentence a to b. But here the website ...
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Is it correct to explain a word using a phrase between two commas?

In the following sentence I placed "gases ejected from an engine as waste products" between commas to explain what exhaust fumes is? Curbing exhaust fumes, gases ejected from an engine as ...
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is it a correct usage of a reduced relative clause in sentence structure?

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? Specially I need to know if I have used the reduced clause "answering their parents back" correctly. Some children misbehave and become ...
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Reduced relative clauses referring to a whole sentence

1a- The station chief was fired, meaning there is an open position. 2a- We argued over something meaningless, making me feel bad. 3a- Dr. Gregory House is often brooding, ill-humored, and pessimistic, ...
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When can ı use -ing as participle or reduced relative clause?

As reduced relative clause: In fact, there is evidence suggesting that lower amounts are indeed efficacious. As (present) participle: In fact, there is suggesting evidence that lower amounts are ...
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Should I use a comma before a reduced and defining relative clause in this sentence?

A simple linear relationship between force and displacement known as Hooke's Law was discovered in the 1600s. I wrote this sentence and intended to use a reduced and defining relative clause, "...
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Can I use a non-defining and defining clause for the same noun?

I'm curious if I can use a non-defining and defining clause/phrase in a row for the same noun in a sentence. For instance, I sold the ring, an expensive one, that I bought a few years ago. (I intend ...
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Can I use a relative clause and a reduced relative clause for the same noun?

I don't like the computer gifted to me by my father that doesn't have enough RAM. OR I don't like the computer that doesn't have enough RAM gifted to me by my father. Can I use these sentences?
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"A student who is researching" vs "a student researching" [duplicate]

Can I shorten the sentence like this? 1- This is Peter, a student who is researching nuclear physics at a university . 2- This is Peter, a student researching nuclear physics at a university.
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Should it be "indicating" or ",which indicates"? [duplicate]

Which one of the below is more appropriate? an investigation into sleep score, which indicates the quality of sleep, and life stress revealed significantly negative correlation between life stress ...
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the cop (who's) escorting him

One of the cops escorts Tim out of the house and toward a police car. Curious neighbors have gathered outside. Tim spits on the cop (who's) escorting him. Is "escorts" the more natural ...
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Why “dressed in blue” instead of “dressing in blue”?

The girl dressed in blue is my girlfriend. The girl dressing in blue is my girlfriend. I know the first sentence is correct, but how about the second one? Why do we say "The girl who dresses in ...
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It was one of a few houses (that were) (fully) built?

It was one of a few houses (that were) (fully) built. I want to say that the house was done, does just built mean that or should it be fully built ? and is that were necessary or optional?
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"It ill behooves us alleged early film lovers to forsake their insights today.”

This is from one of the LSATs. "It ill behooves us alleged early film lovers to forsake their insights today.” I don't understand what's the omitted subject being reduced by "alleged .........
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Reduced relative clauses when a non-progressive verb is used (such as "have")

In subjective relative clauses, we can left out the relative pronoun and end its verb using "ing". For example: I can’t find my notebook that contains all my addresses. I can’t find my ...
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Exceeded or exceeding

This is a sentence extracted from a book named “Into thin air”: I’d written more than sixty pieces for Outside over the previous fifteen tears, and seldom had the travel budget for any of these ...
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A comma separating independent clauses

I want to reduce the length of this sentence by adding a comma. However, Grammarly is indicating me that I should avoid it. It is not clear to me since the comma is connecting two independent but ...
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Please explain the use of the word Easy in this sentence

The tennis player, easy through the opening set against her opponent, rallied to take the final two sets for the biggest victory of her young career. Of the following pattern, which one is implied ...
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Question about relative pronouns and clauses

My friend wants to share some sugar with me. I need a container for it. What should I say in the following situations? I'll go and look for something to put it in. I'll go and look for something that/...
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Sentence started with Verb+ing, but it's a really different structure

In the book Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell, I came across this confusing sentence: Facing the square is the Palazzo Marchesale, the palace of the Saggese family, once the great landowner of those parts....
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Sinks and baths have faucets (that are) attached to them [duplicate]

A faucet is a device that controls the flow of a liquid or gas from a pipe or container. Sinks and baths have faucets attached to them. This is the definition of the word faucet. My question is, if ...
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"There will be a translated clip tomorrow." equivalent to "There will be a clip that is/was/has been/will have been translated tomorrow."?

Can I reduce a relative clause like down below? For example: Right now, there is no translated clip. I say, "There will be a translated clip tomorrow." Can it be equivalent to "There ...
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REDUCTIVE RELATIVE CLAUSES

I've recently learnt about relative clauses from reading two websites. I see a conflict between them From the first source :https://www.ef.com/ca/english-resources/english-grammar/non-defining-...
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Can I reduce a relative clause like this?

Can I reduce a relative clause like this from (1) to (2)? (1) People who lift weights but eat unhealthy food and go to bed late are not going to lose wight. (2) People lifting weights but eating ...
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is 'we shall wage' in the following sentence a relative clause?

On the results of the survey depend the extent and the type of campaign, we shall wage. In the above sentence, is we shall wage a reduced version of the relative clause which we shall wage?
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'who' or 'whom'?

I'm learning relative pronoun and I'm using Cliffs Toefl as a reference book. As this book says, relative pronoun who should be followed by a verb and whom should be followed by a noun. According to ...
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I wonder if I can reduce a relative clause with perfect tense in it (present or past perfect)

Question: I wonder if I can reduce a relative clause with perfect tense in it (present or past perfect). It is a topic few sites talk about, so I ask it here. Examples I came up with: 1. Original: I ...
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Question about reduced relative clauses: Can "having..." mean both "which had... " and "which have..."?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered ...
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What are the grammar of these sentence? (an IELTS writing, Task 1)

When I was reading this website "https://www.ieltsbuddy.com/ielts-task-1-map.html", I faced with some questions: Somewhere it was written: 1-There have been several changes, the most ...
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Reduced relative clauses used with some particular adjectives

According to Practical English Usage by Michael Swan, Reduced structures are also used with the adjectives available and possible. Please send me all the tickets available. (=...that are available) ...
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as + past participle

I’d like to know when it comes to the meaning of adjective phrase in a sentence, what’s the difference between the addition of as and the standard application of adjective phrase without as? For ...
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Omitting relative pronoun

He is the man whom I met yesterday. A relative pronoun can be omitted when it doesn't refer to the subject of the clause. So we can omit the relative pronoun 'whom' from the clause. But the clause is ...
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Confused about the construction of the sentence

I have been trying to understand the actual construction of these type of sentences, but there still is a confusion to my understanding. I have seen many answers to questions regarding this type of ...
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“I saw him who was smiling”

I saw him smiling. Here the participle smiling acts as an adjective, right? I think something is omitted in the sentence. The complete sentence is: I saw him who was smiling. Is my concept ...
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When can we reduce a relative clause?

I got this information while learning about “reduced relative clause”. Is the given information correct? I know that we can reduce a relative clause even if it modifies an object of a verb. Thus we ...
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Omission of was

Court dismissed the plea filed by the victim. Above is the original sentence read by me in news paper Can I write the sentence as below, Court dismissed the plea (which was) filed by the victim.
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reduction of an adjective clause that modifies a whole sentence to an adjective phrase

I know there’s a universal agreement that an adjective clause can be reduced to an adjective phrase. However, I’d like to know whether the same rule could apply to the informal use of an adjective ...
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"Reduced clause - meaning ?"

Make (one account) consistent with another, especially by allowing for transactions begun but not yet completed. Since this sentence is using "reduce clause" and "allow for" is ...
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Is this sentence on CNN wrong with two relative pronouns:"There has been no American that has needed a ventilator that has not received one."

I heard the following sentence on TV at a speech by a native speaker. "...There has been no American that has needed a ventilator that has not received one." As you can see, there are two relative ...
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omission of 'being' in relative clauses

Here is a sentence I've read in an article from BBC News: According to a new book, South Korean Popular Culture and North Korea, South Korea's government "targeted the export of popular media ...
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reducing relative clause using prefer verb

I was curious to know what kind of reduction has used for the word "preferring" in the following sentence. I think punctuation is not correct. I guess it originally had been ", because they(students) ...
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Why "being" was not eliminated?

1- I come across with below sentence written by a professor from the US in a paper: All amorphous material are actually in states which are configurationally frozen, a particular configuration ...
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Is "It was she did" grammatically correct?

Someone asks me who did it if I answer "It was she did" Is it correct? Or is it preferable to say "It was she who did it" or other answer
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What does "where" mean in "co-operating with liberal or conservative parties where possible to survive the entire term"?

In their 2020-02-05 column, “Minority report: German politics”, The Economist writes: In the 1970s West Germany’s two main parties, one centre-left, one centre-right, together captured over 90% of ...
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"She was first female president to be elected in 1919."

She was first female president to be elected in 1919. Does the meaning of this sentence same as She was first female president who was elected in 1919.
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Those managing development teams

Would it be correct to say/write: These are the essential skills for those managing development teams. meaning: These are the essential skills for those who are managing development teams. And ...
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Do "running down the street" and "run down the street" have the same meaning?

I suddenly found myself running down the street. l suddenly found myself who run down the street. Is running down the street a gerund clause or reduced relative clause?