Questions tagged [redundancy]

For questions about whether the same word appearing two or more times in a sentence is appropriate, or about whether a word or phrase is repeating information unnecessarily.

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Why is "proceed to" needed in this sentence?

I saw an English sentence that says: The driver change frustrated Almirola, who proceeded to leave the track before the race ended. I don't understand why we need "proceed to" in the ...
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Is the word "genuinely" redundant in this sentence (I have to genuienly agree with you)?

I replied to someone's text by saying, "I have to genuinely agree with you." However, the person told me that the word "genuinely" in this sentence is redundant. It dilutes the ...
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Is it correct to use two 'of's very close to each other in a sentence?

Is it correct to use two 'of's very close to each other, in the following sentence? A photo with the advanced stage of execution of the electronic device. How to avoid this in my case?
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Can a semi-colon be used like this? Are there more reduced forms of these sentences?

Is it understood when semi-colons and commas are used to combine long, similar clauses like this? Which one is correct of the following?: A) The color on the square to the right turned red, the one to ...
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Is the change in the tense of "do" understood when "done" is omitted?

I've always wondered about this kind of sentence: You can't do (it); you have to wait for it to be (done). Is the "done" necessary? Without done, is it allowed so in any other type of ...
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Is it redundant to write synonyms next to each other?

For example look at the following text: The mood of the negotiation were amiable and friendly that they soon reached an agreement. Is "amiable and friendly" a redundancy? or it is OK to ...
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"the dog I kicked" vs. "the dog that I kicked"

Are both of the following correct? If so, when should each be used? The dog I kicked is sad. The dog that I kicked is sad.
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1 answer
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provides free job training programs

I'm wondering if it is advisable to remove the "programs" in the following. If so, why? This institute provides free job training programs for adults.
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contributed to the fact that

Which of the following versions better conforms to stylistic conventions? a. The incident contributed to the passage of a blanket prohibition on abortion that would take effect next year. b. The ...
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too expensive for John to buy it

Is it okay to include "it" in the following sentences? a. The car is too expensive for John to buy it. b. The car is cheap enough for John to buy it.
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"own" is redundant in the following text? I'm always confused about using this word

In the following text, I feel that "own" makes my opinion clearer. I want to say that people have different priorities and therefore they need to weigh everything up themselves. so we could ...
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Modal verb + "be able to"

I might (be able to) help you. You may (be able to) get extra money. You should (be able to) feel this You re foolish to expect to (be able to) do that. Is there any meaningful difference between the ...
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"As to what/whether": redundancy

As to what/whether are sometimes considered redundant but have long been standard: an argument as to what department was responsible. https://www.wordreference.com/definition/as Why are As to what/...
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Is "dwarf size" redundant?

The headline I came across with is: Elephants could have become dwarf size on the island off Italy’s boot in as little as 40 generations, according to new research. isn't "dwarf size" ...
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Is it ok to use two "of"s in a sentence

I am currently writing a summary for a poison called "Wourali". One of the ingredients for it is two kinds of bulbous plants(specifically the stalks of them). Is this fine? They bind the ...
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Is it possible to combine two sentences structured like this: if A then B. if no A then no B

The following two sentences seem redundant. How do I combine them into a single sentence? Shortcomings are actually valuable opportunities that enable you to explore your potentials. Without ...
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Does a redundant word make an English sentence incorrect?

Consider the following two sentences: If you do not study, you will fail the exam. If you do not study, then you will fail the exam. I know that the first sentence is preferred over the second one. ...
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Is it grammatically correct to use the word "how" twice in one sentence?

How did you figure out how to solve these difficult physics problems? Is it awkward to use "how" twice in the same question?
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"true" and "indeed": redundant in same sentence?

can we use the word indeed in the following sentence or does it sound like redundant by using the words true and indeed in the same sentence It is true that everyone, indeed, possesses strengths and ...
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Question about "If I'm not mistaken, it's a kind of"

Is this sentence right? If I'm not mistaken, it's a kind of a rococo style. The expression «a kind of» is only used when you're not sure about something, right? If so, is it correct to say «If I'm ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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the very... himself

-- I don't understand why he said one thing and then went on to do another! -- Well, I would ask the very man himself. My question is, can "very" be used together with "himself" ...
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Is this sentence pleonastic?

I have this sentence People nowadays are so extremely sensitive that they can bear no reproof whatsoever. My query is, is the author being redundant here by adding extremely? Should we omit it ...
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Is it redundant to say "I do that everyday as my mom asks me do that"?

A friend and I talked about chores at home, I said I hate doing the dishes though I do that everyday as my mom asks me do that. I'm pretty sure the part before "though" is idiomatic as ...
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Harms vs. could harm [closed]

On the other hand, there are a lot of cases where X could harm Y or at least gives nothing. On the other hand, there are a lot of cases where X harms Y or at least gives nothing. Which sentence is ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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reading comprehension: redundant or implicit meaning?

I am learning English from reading articles every day. I have recently read "Writers in the Storm" by Kathryn Schulz (link: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/11/23/writers-in-the-...
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Using to twice in a sentence - To whomever they were sent to

In the above example, would it be more correct to say: "To whomever they were sent" or "To whomever they were sent to"? Another example is: "To what month is the event being deferred to?" Would it ...
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Is that sentence redundant?

This question is my future research work How does modernization in the transport road network sector affect on economic development of Kazakhstan? Does the question sound correct? It seems to me. ...
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16 votes
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Is the "global" in "global pandemic" redundant?

A pandemic is an epidemic that spreads internationally. My friend said that COVID-19 is a global pandemic. Isn't saying that coronavirus is a pandemic already indicative that it is global? Is "...
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Does this sentence sound redundant?

This mood is mainly created by the voice-over that consists of a sound clip, probably recorded in 1949, in which a man reads article 24 of the Geneva Convention in a very serious tone. Is this ...
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reading a mystery novel again

a. Jane is reading a mystery novel again. b. Jane is reading another mystery novel again. c. Jane is reading the same mystery novel again. Are the above sentences grammatically correct? Do they ...
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'of' three times in a sentence

How do I say the exact same without using 'of' three times? This video contains a lot of footage of well-known events of the last 80 years.
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redundancy: about 60 or thereabouts

I saw the following sentence in a dictionary. Does "about" contribute to its meaning? Is the sentence good in terms of style? She must be about 60 or thereabouts. I'd appreciate your help.
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are "displayed upfront" and "hidden covertly" the same? I guess not and I need a double check

This post says overlays of a symbol or text that may be hidden covertly or displayed upfront to protect an image from being used without owner’s approval. to illustrate above, the post gives ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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The reason I'm writing this email is to [closed]

I saw the following sentence at the start of an e-mail. While it is grammatical, I'd like know if it is natural. Dear Mr. Smith: The reason I'm writing this e-mail is to inform you of a change ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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"(An) exactly (the) same": two articles ok?

Does it make sense when two articles are used, for example “An exactly the same”? If the former conveys inspecific/abstract item, then what does the latter do?
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Is that "it" redundant?

"What do you anticipate it will be the impact of higher tariffs between China and US on your business?" Is that "it" redundant? Just like what do you think will be the impact?
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2 votes
2 answers
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In error correcting, "Most of the magnesium used in the US comes from the seawater."

Most of the magnesium used in the US comes from the seawater. I said there's no error in here. But the teacher says "the" (from the seawater) is redundant. But I think it's necessary cause the US don'...
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1 answer
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The placement of participles defining the subject of the main clause

As far as I know, we can use participles right before or after the subject of the main clause to give extra information about the subject. For example: 1- Dressed in his class-A uniform, the marine ...
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One common topic that has been discussed with increasing regularity

In the following passage, is "One common topic that has been discussed with increasing regularity" considered good style? Would it be advisable to rewrite it as "One increasingly common topic"? Also, ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is the "is" redundant here?

The two sentences: The lighter the camera, the harder it is to hold steady. The lighter the camera is, the harder it is to hold steady. I just saw the former one but always make the ...
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Can we use 'by the then' and 'of the time' in a sentence?

Is it right to use both 'by the then' and 'of the time' in a sentence like this: by the then Department of General Statistics of the time
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You can do ..., but you can't do

Is there a smarter way to say You can do <...>, but you can't do <...>. ? Sounds very dumb to me. I think it's better to avoid such self-repeating.
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1 answer
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Why is it wrong to say "We'll meet on next Monday"?

I heard that it was wrong and we use: We'll meet next Monday. This is apparently because we don't use on before next. Is this true and why? It sounds good to me. Is it just an idiomatic thing?
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1 answer
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How do I avoid repeating the same word several times? [closed]

I have written the following sentence, but I feel that it's too long, especially the number of the word "animal" is too many. What's your idea about this? If so, please suggest me how to make it more ...
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0 votes
3 answers
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How to avoid repeating "method A" in this sentence?

I try to say that the next example explain the idea my new method. However, I just repeat some words which make my sentence hard to follow. Here is my try: To simplify the idea of method A, the ...
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1 answer
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As simple be it may

"I feel like anything I say, as simple be it may, you're gonna like me". Is the previous sentence grammatically correct? What is the phrase between the two commas usually referred to as? What exactly ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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How to write a good long sentence with different phrases [closed]

I would like to write a sentence which includes some reasons. In my study, I extend a method to a new one. I would like to say that I extend the first one which does something to a new one which ...
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7 votes
4 answers
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"Awaits for you" or "awaits you"?

Is it wrong to say: Happiness awaits for you? Is it totally wrong to put ‘for’ after awaits ?
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11 votes
5 answers
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Repeating "them" in "support them rather than abandon them"

Support them rather than abandon them Is the above correct? Is the repeating of 'them' correct? Can we drop 'them' when we use it second time?
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1 answer
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Am I paraphrasing this right?

Along the way, he found his mother's lost purse and leaving his stuff behind, he ran to the purse. This is not an original sentence but has the same structure. I think there are two points that make ...
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