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Questions tagged [register]

'Register' is the degree of formality called for in a particular written or spoken context. Very broadly, we distinguish 'formal', 'informal' and 'vulgar' usage in both writing and speech, but finer distinctions may be needed.

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Third Conditionals: “If I knew…” instead of “had known…” in casual register

I know that in the following sentences "If I had known" has to be used in the place of "If I knew" to form the grammatically right sentences. What I really want be sure of is that as a native if all ...
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When someone owes money everyone

There is a sentence which says "He owes money left and right." which says has has borrowed money from almost everyone. I would appreciate it if someone could let me know if the following sentence ...
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When you've done an ambulatory surgery

I was wondering if someone could let me know which one of the following self-made sentences sounds more natural in the way that it could be more understood not only by well-educated people of English ...
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Saying “You'll feel me on this”

So, recently, I saw someone commenting, "You'll feel me on this" on a certain post. Since I'm not really familiar with phrases that are more informal (even regarded as slang) in English, I wanted to ...
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388 views

Born with a weight of 5kg

Which of these would it make sense for me to say? My baby was born with a weight of 5kg My baby was born at 5kg My baby was born weighing 5kg Thank you.
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Appropriate response to: Would it be suitable to meet tomorrow noon at your office?

Can I respond to: "Would it be suitable to meet tomorrow noon at your office?" with: "Sure would!"
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245 views

Should we end the given sentence with TO in the given situation?

He's this person who I owe 40$ (to). He's this person I owe 40$ to. He's this person who I owe 40$. Are all these sentences grammatically correct? Are the first and second one grammatically ...
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229 views

“I left my home village yesterday, for which reason my father is sad now”. Is this sentence awkward?

I and my friend are doing an English exercise which requires us to make a sentence with the phrase "for which reason(s)" I have made this sentence: I left my home village yesterday, for which ...
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3answers
92 views

Acknowledging someone had an impact on your choice of career

In the acknowledgements section of my thesis, I just wrote: I would like to thank my supervisor X [...]. To a large extent, it is to his credit that I found my way into the field of Y and I am very ...
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69 views

When you want to find out the reasons behind someone's reclusion

Imagine two friends who are talking about the reclusion that one of them is dealing with it. The one who is OK, wants to ask the other one what has caused him to live in that way during the couple of ...
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1answer
303 views

A phrase for witnessing something that happens every day

One wrote: We can see that many devices are being produced every day. The aim of this sentence is to address something that regularly happens these days, but I am looking for more formal and ...
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How to ask someone to move from their seat?

For example, if there was a sofa in the room, and there were 3 people sitting on it, and there was a little space between their seat. How do you ask them to "move" or to "come close" to each other so ...
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The syntax of metaphors in English

I tried to translate a line of a Persian poem into English, it is almost like: If you come to visit me, come slowly and softly Lest the delicate porcelain of my loneliness cracks Here, the ...
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Can't we use “you and I” here?

It's a line taken from One Direction's song History. You and me got a whole lot of history Shouldn't we use "You and I" instead of "You and me" in above sentence.
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Another adjective rather than good which is used to describe sleeping quality

I am trying to find an adjective to describe sleeping quality other than good, which is used to describe sleeping quality, the word will be used in biology report writing. so the following words ...
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393 views

Put/Place On Anbiotics

I have a question about the difference between verbs "put" and "place" in this context: The doctor put him on antibiotics. The doctor placed him on antibiotics. Any difference ...
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1answer
856 views

Is a “would” required in this sentence

Being a responsible man, arriving half an hour late would surely surprise his wife. But then he thought that it'd be funnier if he waited a couple of hours. Vs. Being a responsible man, he would ...
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Requesting someone to ask a question of another person

Which one would be correct, please a) Just ask him if he has received the payment b) Just ask him has he received the payment c) Just ask him whether he has received the payment
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177 views

Trying to understand both the grammar construction and the author's intent: Although (being) of the opinion that… /Destite the opinion that

At the very beginning of a new book, I stumbled over this: The context sentence: The flying lessons were courtesy of her husband, who was the town’s First Selectman. The problem sentence: ...
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Usage of “after that”

I wrote: Then, we review the related works and after that we present our algorithm. Is it a correct usage of "after that"? I don't want to repeat "then". Is "after that" formal? what about saying ...
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How to welcome somebody formally and friendly / informally? [closed]

Let's suppose you're going to welcome somebody; which one of the following sentences sound more natural in AE and what is the natural ones difference from the formality point of view? It is a ...
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Difference between “special equipment” and “specialized equipment”

My translation of a text by a pipe-producing plant: Bevel angle inspection Inspection of this type is carried out as specified in the regulatory documentation using a bevel protractor or a ...
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1answer
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Is this the correct usage of the word cranial

My doubt is about using the word "cranial" here. Does this make sense? This is great. I am glad I was able to activate something cranial in you.
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Why is 'He is a man whom I look up to.' not quite right even though it is not wrong?

There is nothing grammatically wrong with 'He is a man whom I look up to.' The relative clause is non-defining, so no comma; the relative pronoun refers to a person, so 'who', not 'which'; the ...
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Is using “I am writing to” in an email considered too formal or old-fashioned?

I have seen in a letter writing textbook (also many websites like this) while preparing for my English test that we should begin a letter like this : Dear ..., I am writing to ... I have not ...
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“Is it okay for you?” Is this phrase considered formal in school/college setting?

If I emailed my teacher: I've said that I can stay after school to make up the test, but I found out that I have a band rehersal tomorrow. Is it okay for you if I take it on wednesday after school ...
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'a narrow vocabulary' versus 'a restricted vocabulary': do both collocations exist? which is commoner?

Do both collocations 'a narrow vocabulary' and 'a restricted vocabulary' exist? And if they do, which is commoner/more common?
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“Hear! Hear!”: AmE variations?

This is about the idiom "Hear(!)(,)Hear(!)" (1680s) used (ngram) to express approval during a speech for instance (AHDotEL, Collins, Cambridge, Century, Merriam Learners, Dictionary.com). It can be ...
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apropos — is this a common word in English?

apropos Is this word part of your active or passive vocabulary? Do you ever use it at all? If yes, could you please give me some real-world examples related to how one would use this word in ...
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Is tricky a formal word?

I am now writing a report which requires me to use formal, academic English...here's the question. I want to describe a task as more difficult, or more challenging than other ones. Can I use the word "...
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1answer
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May I use 'Good job, sir' to appreciate my boss' work?

Somewhat, I feel it down using this sentence to our seniors, especially our boss. Good job, sir Or...for that sake.. Well done, sir I need natives' input for this. If I'm working for you/under ...
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1answer
891 views

“I don't have the car tomorrow.”

My friend and colleague doesn't have a car but he often uses his dad's car; so when he drives to work he most frequently picks me up and we go together. Last night he texted me and said: "I don't ...
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6answers
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Slight nuance between 'fat', 'obese' and 'overweight'

Could someone please tell me about the nuances of the adjectives: Fat Obese Overweight The only difference which comes to my mind is their formality degree, where 'fat' is the most ...
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1answer
842 views

How formal is “and all that”?

How formal is it to say, e.g.,: You could do a lot with this item, like writing, drawing and all that. This may be an abbreviation of "and all that jazz", which means "and all that stuff; and all ...
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623 views

Does “affirmative” mean “yes”

One hears people in the movies say "Affirmative" when they are speaking on a telephone or on a walkie-talkie. Does this word mean "yes"? Can it be used instead of "yes"?
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Learning “register”: are there any register-conflicts in this sentence

This text was written by coffee1054 in this question: We gonna show that there is no contradiction with Ohm's law. Is there any register-conflict in this sentence? Moved into the body of the ...
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Excrement, faeces or poop?

In daily conversation, when we discuss/say about the baby excrement/faeces. Which word should we used? Excrement, faeces or poop?
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Isn't there no difference between yeah, yes and yah

“Are you coming with us?” “Yeah, I'm coming.” (Merriam-Webster's Learner's) In my tongue, for saying ‘yes (Korean yes),’ I could say ‘ye [je̞]’ or ‘ne [ne].’ Korean dictionaries say there’s no ...
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“sibling” vs “brother/sister”

Are these words interchangeable? I'm especially interested in how formal/informal are they. Is there any difference between American and British usage? The discussion on english-test.net where two ...
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What is the register of “to be shamed”? [closed]

I was wondering in what conditions is it considered as correct to use "to be shamed" ? What is the register of this verb ?
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1answer
227 views

Does anyone know which of the following sentences is more used by native English speakers?

Which of the following sentences is more used by English native speakers verbally and in writing? Do you know where Susan works? Do you know, Where does Susan work?
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“You are” vs. “you're” — what is the difference between them?

“You are” vs. “you're” — what is the difference between them? I get confused between the two a lot. I want to understand how to use them appropriately, because I hate making mistakes.
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102 views

“Simple past” when talking about possibility

Could someone please explain why the bold part is in "simple past"? You asked where did I live in Carstairs. Well, it was not anyplace to be proud of. If you know where Vinegar Hill is and you ...
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274 views

The authors would thank

Is this a normal sentence in english? The authors would thank XY for his support .... For me as a nonnative speaker it sounds like there needs to follow a negative part .. if XY hadn't screwed ...
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How to concisely express 'at many place' similar to somewhere, nowhere and everywhere?

I searched on the Internet and found the opposite of 'somewhere' is 'nowhere.' This confuses me, because I see it like this: The opposite of "everywhere" (at all places) is "nowhere" (at no places). ...
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Asking 'the pleasure of your company' in an invitation

This is a great site - I would happily pay for this advice. I must fess up and say I am a native English speaker (albeit an Irish one) but I'm running into trouble wording a party invitation. Is it ...
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“It is not well” or “it is not good”?

Watching an old Dr. Who episode, one character said to another, "Highness, it is not well to think of the past, there is still the future to make." ("The Ribos Operation", 1978) To my ear, this ...
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How to learn English in quick way [closed]

I am not very good with the English language. I have three questions: While talking to others, most of them ask me why I am talking in much too complex a fashion (that is, they are not understanding ...
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When is it acceptable to omit the subject “I”?

Have noticed that English speakers omit "I" when they are emailing or chatting: How are you doing? Am fine. Also, this occurs often in daily/weekly reports. Have seen quite a few of them, ...
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How sophisticated does the word 'occidental' sound for the average native speaker?

The word oriental is quite widely used. But its counterpart, occidental is not so popular, at least I don't hear it so often. What's more, my contact with English is mostly by technical documentation,...