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Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

A clause used to join two sentences together, or to provide more information about something.

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6
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2answers
2k views

Is 'where' used as a pronoun in relative clauses?

Please take a look at the following examples: (a) Statement: He works in a office. (b) Relative clause:   1. The office where he works (is for rent).   2. The office in which he works (is for rent). ...
6
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1answer
1k views

Omission of “that” (in this text)

I'm trying to re-write published newspaper articles for practice writing. The original reads: We seem to forget that we all have some rights over the government. The government has come into being ...
4
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3answers
899 views

What is the subject of this sentence

I've seen this sentence in someone's facebook status but it sounds unnatural to me. I'm the Rumplestiltskin who spins straw into gold I thought it should be spin because the subject is I, but I'm ...
4
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1answer
2k views

“which” as relative determiner?

Sentence 1: I was told my work was unsatisfactory, at which point I submitted my resignation. Sentence 2:Sometimes you may feel too frail to cope with things, in which case do them as soon as it is ...
17
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4answers
6k views

Stephen Hawking believes that the earth is unlikely to be the only planet ____ life has developed gradually

(I'm reading a grammar textbook, which contains the question and clams it was written for China's National College Entrance Examination in 2010. I checked, and it was.) Stephen Hawking believes ...
6
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3answers
304 views

The use or omission of commas round relative clauses

In Longman English Grammar Practice, there is a practice question in which you would say what the sentences mean with and without commas. My brother who is in Canada is an architect. Without ...
5
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2answers
2k views

How do you say “which each” or “who each”?

I speak in Persian, sometimes as I translate a sentence from my native language to English, I doubt if its structure is correct. I want to say (for example) "I have some children who each have a ...
2
votes
1answer
88 views

a way that most people think {is / it is} wrong

I was reading definition/meaning of the word "perverse" in Oxford Dictionary, came across : showing deliberate determination to behave in a way that most people think is wrong, unacceptable or ...
4
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2answers
707 views

“in which people study” or “where people study on”

Should it be: Campus is a place in which children study. or Campus is a place where children study on. Which one is correct, or are they both incorrect? Why? Is there a better version?
4
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2answers
173 views

analysis for “such as”

When once more alone, I reviewed the information I had got; looked into my heart, examined its thoughts and feelings, and endeavoured to bring back with a strict hand such as had been straying ...
4
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4answers
2k views

“one of the upgrades that is/are being considered”

I've run into this problem multiple times when writing the following: "one of the upgrades that is being considered is a ..." Word spell check suggests that this is incorrect and it should ...
3
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2answers
229 views

“with” preposition at the beginning or at the end of a sentence

Which is correct: This is the most beautiful programming language with that I ever worked! or, This is the most beautiful programming language that I ever worked with!
1
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1answer
918 views

Looking at the kids which - or that/who?

We look at the kids which/that/who skillfully use tablets with the help of their small fingers and we understand that to surprise the younger generation will be more difficult each year. Is the ...
5
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2answers
302 views

Omitting the article before defining relative clause

We use the definite article before defining a relative clause when we mean specific instances— this is a well-known rule. What if we omit an article in order to say something in a more general way, ...
2
votes
2answers
650 views

that which belongs to or is connected with her

that which belongs to or is connected with her (Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s) 'Though ‘which’ can be replaced by ‘that’ in relative constructions' they say, when it is placed after ‘that’ I wonder if ...
1
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1answer
154 views

Using “where” in this sentence

I wrote this sentence (actually, part of it ;) Similar problems may arise if a voiceless plosive /p/ is understood as a voiced plosive /b/ then a ‘pour’ becomes a ‘bore’. It is especially the case ...
1
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1answer
205 views

Reduced relative clauses with non-progressive verbs

Is it correct to change, for example: The people who like money too much must be kicked out of politics. to: The people liking money too much must be kicked out of politics.
3
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2answers
35 views

Why doesn't the clause “…and reputation its shadow” need a verb?

The clause "reputation its shadow" in "Character is like a tree and reputation its shadow" has no verb, but is still correct. Please kindly tell me the grammar point used here!
3
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1answer
553 views

Relative clauses with and without “the”

It's a shame but I hadn't noticed we can use relative clauses without "the" until saw the comments of my answer to this question It suggests there is difference between: The boys who are 16 years ...
2
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2answers
514 views

on which condition should i use the right word [ which,that] which leads to subordinate clause?

I find the bag which you bought yesterday on the desk. I find the bag that you bought yesterday on the desk. Which one is correct? or both are right? I want to know on which condition ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Where does ';for which…' fit (note the ;)? (1575 Late April, UK)

Source: p 101, Lives and letters of the Devereux, earls of Essex, by Walter Bourchier Devereux [p 100 states that this letter was undated, but the penultimate sentence on p99 (ie the last sentence ...
2
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3answers
438 views

Do these 2 sentences have the same meaning?

The sentence below shows age restriction for swimming: The boys who are 16 years old are allowed to swim. What if I write this sentence? Does it have the same meaning? The boys who are allowed ...
2
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1answer
359 views

Is this an adjectival or adverbial phrase?

I want to know everything there is to know about you. Does ‘to know about you’ modify everything (adjectival function) or is it an adverbial phrase? Or are both possible?
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2answers
75 views

Jane is back in May, by____ the new house should be finished

Jane is back in May, by____ the new house should be finished. A. which B. that C. whom D. when "when" is the answer, and I know its grammar. My question is whether or not "which" works and why. ...
1
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1answer
279 views

Omiting relative pronouns

I've been confused with the relative pronouns. I bring the following examples and the result after removing relative pronouns? Are they correct? 1a. This is the window which has been broken by me. ...
1
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1answer
141 views

“Which” versus “that” when I can't put off the phrase by comma

John takes a long sling, connects its one end to the cam which is inserted into the hole close by her and connects the other end to the climbing rope. There are many cams. "The cam" refers to a ...
1
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1answer
12k views

“One of them” vs. “One of which”

Which one is grammatically correct or better? I have two assignments, One of them is done. I have two assignments, One of which is done. I watched a video tutorial that the teacher said the ...
0
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2answers
122 views

Omitting “who is” in “I would like to date a girl [who is] at least of my intellect”

Instead of I would like to date a girl who is at least of my intellect. can I say I would like to date a girl at least of my intellect. by dropping the phrase "who is"? What I try to mean ...