Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

A clause used to join two sentences together, or to provide more information about something.

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"We missed the bus, which made us late for school" - erroneous use of "which"?

From a discussion at Lang-8: Kim and I ran fast as we could, but we missed the bus, which made us late for school. I believe the sentence's use of the relative clause to be okay: the relative ...
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25 votes
3 answers
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"The girl I love hates me" or "The girl who I love hates me"

The girl I love hates me Is the sentence grammatically correct? My teacher says it should be the girl who I love hates me
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16 votes
4 answers
6k views

Stephen Hawking believes that the earth is unlikely to be the only planet ____ life has developed gradually

(I'm reading a grammar textbook, which contains the question and clams it was written for China's National College Entrance Examination in 2010. I checked, and it was.) Stephen Hawking believes ...
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12 votes
2 answers
1k views

What does "...was a saint, upon which declaration..." mean in this Wikipedia article?

Source Canonization is the act by which the Orthodox, Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholic, or Anglican Church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is ...
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11 votes
4 answers
3k views

"Outside there is a money receiver which only accepts coins" - or "that only accepts coins"? Which relative pronoun is better?

I'm preparing for academic IELTS by writing some essays and then correcting those using a grammar correction app. In the following sentence, Outside there is a money receiver which only accepts coins ...
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10 votes
4 answers
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Is there a golden rule to judge what the word "which" stands for in a sentence?

There are many rules to help us judge what the word "which" stands for in a sentence. But there always have so many exceptions. And the best way for judging seems to use these rules as well as make ...
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10 votes
1 answer
580 views

Why is the subject omitted?

The class everyone had really been looking forward to was Defense Against the Dark Arts, but Quirrell's lessons turned out to be a bit of a joke. His classroom smelled strongly of garlic, which ...
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10 votes
2 answers
14k views

"one of those men who doesn't" vs. "one of those men who don't"

Which is the correct form: one of those men who doesn't one of those men who don't I searched in Google Books and found 9 results for doesn't and 5 results for don't. Maybe both options are ...
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9 votes
4 answers
2k views

Interpretation of an integrated relative in "my brother who doesn't [live in New York]" in context

Here goes a sentence from a grammar test published on the online version of The Telegraph (UK): I should like to introduce you to my sister Amanda, who lives in New York, to Mark, my brother who ...
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7 votes
6 answers
2k views

How to avoid ambiguity of the antecedent of a relative clause?

I wrote this technical text, which I found ambiguous: What's a child expression? It's a call expression inside a function, which represents a parent call expression. For the purposes of ...
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7 votes
2 answers
3k views

How do you say "which each" or "who each"?

I speak in Persian, sometimes as I translate a sentence from my native language to English, I doubt if its structure is correct. I want to say (for example) "I have some children who each have a ...
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7 votes
2 answers
855 views

Interrogative in relative clauses

I wrote: However, the program needs a feature training file, (feat.trn), which I don't know what it is, and how I can provide it. I know in relative clauses wh-words are used as the absent pronoun ...
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7 votes
5 answers
676 views

ambiguity?: to infinitive phrase as a purpose clause or an infinitival relative clause

I think the grammar of To-infinitive is the most difficult part of learning English because it is hard for me like ESL students to know which is which. I mean, I'm, well, just wanting to classify the ...
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7 votes
3 answers
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Words like 'place' in 'the place where/that/∅ ...'

A discussion under a recent question brought up a topic I've been wondering about for a while: Only the word "place" is unusual and has the formula "the place where/that/∅", isn't (or should I say "...
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6 votes
5 answers
3k views

Omitting 'that' in this sentence

There is so much (that) is at stake for many. Can we omit 'that' in this sentence?
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6 votes
3 answers
21k views

“all of who” or “all of whom”?

In the following excerpt Prominent absentees from the event apart from Punia, were cricketer Ravindra Jadeja, Asian Games gold-medallist shot-putter Tejinder Pal Singh Toor, and silver-winner ...
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6 votes
1 answer
2k views

Omission of “that” (in this text)

I'm trying to re-write published newspaper articles for practice writing. The original reads: We seem to forget that we all have some rights over the government. The government has come into being ...
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6 votes
2 answers
373 views

Is this a Run-ON Sentence?

Sentence that needs correction : "The Americans and The Bostonians are two Henry James novels , the film versions of which have been as successful as the book versions". Isn't this a run on ...
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6 votes
6 answers
805 views

"Never attribute to malice THAT WHICH is adequately explained by stupidity"

The following sentence is part of a famous saying called Hanlon's razor: Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity I'm confused by the "that which". Why do you need ...
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6 votes
3 answers
308 views

What grammatical concept is "I want dating my wife"?

A line was said in the Big Bang Theory. I’m starting to think you’re not the kind of guy I want dating my wife. I know that we say "You are not the kind of guy I want for my wife to date. Or ...
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Do native speakers often use relative clauses?

Do native speakers use "relative clauses" much when speaking? For example: "The bag he is carrying is very heavy." or "Have you seen the photos Ann took?" Do native speakers ...
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5 votes
3 answers
525 views

The use or omission of commas round relative clauses

In Longman English Grammar Practice, there is a practice question in which you would say what the sentences mean with and without commas. My brother who is in Canada is an architect. Without ...
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5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Fruits are an evolutionary mechanism, which IS... or which ARE...?

I wrote a sentence similar to the titular, and got feedback that it should be: "Fruits are an evolutionary mechanism, which ARE ..." in order to keep consistent plurality (with the plural &...
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5 votes
2 answers
179 views

(Singular subject) + which + are?

It is a pretty big floor and you are just running around praying for a terminal which are surprisingly rare. So, I wrote this sentence in a forum long time ago and now that I look at it again, I am ...
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5 votes
3 answers
2k views

The University of St Andrews ______ is the oldest university in Scotland

The University of St Andrews ______ is the oldest university in Scotland. A. which was founded in 1413 B. , which was founded in 1413, C. , that was founded in 1413, The answer is 'B'. I wonder why '...
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5 votes
2 answers
2k views

Choice of tense following "I wish it was true that..."

Which is correct? I wish it was true that I don't love you. OR I wish it was true that I didn't love you. I am talking in the present time, trying to express that I am not happy as a result ...
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5 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is 'where' used as a pronoun in relative clauses?

Please take a look at the following examples: (a) Statement: He works in a office. (b) Relative clause:   1. The office where he works (is for rent).   2. The office in which he works (is for rent). ...
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5 votes
2 answers
267 views

I am confused over whether to use "what" or "that"

The sentence goes one of these two ways: "He knows WHAT other teachers don't know" or perhaps: "He knows things THAT others teachers don't" Which is better to use - WHAT or THAT? Are they ...
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5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can I replace the relative adjective "where" with "that"?

—Can you believe I had to pay 30 dollars for a haircut? —You should try the barber’s where I go. It’s only 15. In the above sentence, can I replace "where" with "that" or omit it? Can I say "You ...
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5 votes
2 answers
816 views

Should clauses always start with a relative or subordinate? Can it also start with a preposition? Can there be clauses within prepositional phrases?

Is there a clause or a prepositional phrase in the sentence, That is the large, main branch from which many smaller branches branch out? If it is a prepositional phrase, what is the object? If it ...
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5 votes
2 answers
405 views

Are these two consecutive relative clauses that modify the same noun phrase?

“ ‘Landry’s funeral was covered as lavishly as any celebrity wedding in the tawdry magazines who feed on the famous, and whose publishers will surely mourn her demise longer than most. We were ...
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5 votes
1 answer
479 views

When should I use the definite article before a plural noun + relative clause?

Here are examples from my posts on Lang-8: E1. Its style was older -- for example, "today" was written there as "to-day" -- but it had no typos, or at least far fewer of them. Out ...
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5 votes
3 answers
171 views

How much can the distance between a noun and its relative clause be?

In the sentence I have read your paper, which is very well-written, carefully. "your paper" is described by the relative clause "which is very well-written". I'm looking for grammar rules ...
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5 votes
2 answers
504 views

Omitting the article before defining relative clause

We use the definite article before defining a relative clause when we mean specific instances— this is a well-known rule. What if we omit an article in order to say something in a more general way, ...
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5 votes
1 answer
89 views

What is the best way to phrase this?

This is the sentence in question: "Describe an experience that you went out with your friends and had a good time." I found this in an ESL speaking practice booklet (compiled by non-native ...
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5 votes
2 answers
859 views

Present perfect + when + (past simple / present perfect)?

I have no idea what tense should I use after the "when clause" when the first part of a sentence is in present perfect. Should I use past simple (continuous) or present perfect (continuous)? I've ...
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5 votes
1 answer
64 views

What grammatical concept is this?

I have always been confused about this pattern. I can't be the first person to forget to pay his taxes. That was the 11th family member to have been killed. He can't be the person to have ...
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5 votes
3 answers
191 views

Where is the exact position of the word that leads to subordinate clause?

Please look at the two following sentences which make me confused: I drove the lady who we saw the day before yesterday to her house yesterday. I drove the lady to her house yesterday, who we saw ...
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5 votes
5 answers
189 views

A question regarding a modifying clause

The subjunctive mood is the verb form used to express a wish, a suggestion, a command, or a condition that is contrary to fact.(cited from http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/subjunctive_mood.htm) ...
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4 votes
2 answers
997 views

Grammatical usage of relative pronoun: "many people came who were interested in art"

I'm confused by this sentence: many people came who were interested in art Why is who is used after came? Is it correct?
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4 votes
3 answers
569 views

"In whose symbolic shadow we stand today"

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. It's a line from Martin Luther King's famous speech, I wonder if it is inverted? ...
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  • 462
4 votes
2 answers
397 views

"the chemical and physical changes it undergoes" -- What does the clause in the end indicate?

I'm reading now a chemistry book which saying: Chemistry is the study of matter, its chemical and physical properties, the chemical and physical changes it undergoes, and the energy changes ...
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

"in which people study" or "where people study on"

Should it be: Campus is a place in which children study. or Campus is a place where children study on. Which one is correct, or are they both incorrect? Why? Is there a better version?
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4 votes
1 answer
47k views

"One of them" vs. "One of which"

Which one is grammatically correct or better? I have two assignments, One of them is done. I have two assignments, One of which is done. I watched a video tutorial that the teacher said the ...
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  • 1,846
4 votes
1 answer
587 views

"This can make us think the concepts are related, which in fact they are not."

This can lead inexperienced mathematicians to conclude that these concepts are related, which in fact they are not. Source: Wikipedia. I would expect the bold part to instead be "which, in fact, are ...
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  • 276
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

"which" as relative determiner?

Sentence 1: I was told my work was unsatisfactory, at which point I submitted my resignation. Sentence 2:Sometimes you may feel too frail to cope with things, in which case do them as soon as it is ...
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4 votes
2 answers
233 views

analysis for "such as"

When once more alone, I reviewed the information I had got; looked into my heart, examined its thoughts and feelings, and endeavoured to bring back with a strict hand such as had been straying ...
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4 votes
5 answers
6k views

"Whichever ONE/ONES you choose DO/DOES not matter"

Is it grammatical to say Whichever ones you choose does not matter or do I have to say whichever ones you choose do not matter? Because "it doesn't matter whichever one you choose" is ...
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4 votes
4 answers
2k views

"one of the upgrades that is/are being considered"

I've run into this problem multiple times when writing the following: "one of the upgrades that is being considered is a ..." Word spell check suggests that this is incorrect and it should ...
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4 votes
2 answers
9k views

Which one of the following is a correct grammatical conclusion?

I am practicing independent writing for TOEFL iBT test. I have read a passage which says that universities should focus more on research. I also have a listing in which the lecturer believes that ...
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