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Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

A clause used to join two sentences together, or to provide more information about something.

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London where he comes from or London from where he comes? [closed]

He comes from London. He goes to London. If we use London as an antecedent in a noun clause.what are the correct noun clauses given below? (a) London where he comes from. (b) London ...
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"A place which we can stay" or "A place which we can stay in"?

1. (a) We need a place where we can stay. (b) We need a place (that) we can stay. (no preposition at the end of clause) 2. (a) We need a house where we can stay. (b) We need a house (that) we ...
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Is 'where' used as a pronoun in relative clauses?

Please take a look at the following examples: (a) Statement: He works in a office. (b) Relative clause:   1. The office where he works (is for rent).   2. The office in which he works (is for rent). ...
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Can 'why' act as a relative pronoun?

Please consider the following two main clauses. Both variables have the same range of values. Therefore, a 4:3 aspect ratio has been chosen. I would like to combine these two main clauses into one ...
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A girl who there was at hospital or A girl who was at hospital

1.There was a girl with him. 2.I remember her. In adjective clauses,which are use to describe 'a girl' here,what structure should we use? (a) (I remember a girl) who there was with him. ...
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Using two "that" clauses

The following sounds correct to me but that is always the case with mistakes ;) I spend a lot of time making sure that everything is clean, that everything is as it should be. Were the two "that"...
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Is “which if you listen to will tell you” an acceptable construction?

God has equipped you with an internal compass which if you listen to will tell you if you are living to your full potential.Source: ect.org forum, topic: Does severe retrograde amnesia create a new ...
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an eternal verity "which, attending," has planted

Forth from the age-yellowed pages (of the book) there leapt an eternal verity; which, attending, has planted new seeds of wisdom in the soil of my mind. (an internal meditation on the Holy Bible 1890)
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"This can make us think the concepts are related, which in fact they are not."

This can lead inexperienced mathematicians to conclude that these concepts are related, which in fact they are not. Source: Wikipedia. I would expect the bold part to instead be "which, in fact, are ...
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Are these two consecutive relative clauses that modify the same noun phrase?

“ ‘Landry’s funeral was covered as lavishly as any celebrity wedding in the tawdry magazines who feed on the famous, and whose publishers will surely mourn her demise longer than most. We were ...
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"depend on" in relative clause

Collins Cobuild English Grammar says "If the verb in a relative clause is a phrasal verb ending with a preposition, you cannot move the preposition to the beginning of the clause." Macmillan says "...
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Which relativizers may be used in modifying clauses and phrases?

If a relative clause modifies a noun or a pronoun in a main clause, then we could use relative pronouns such as that, which, who, whom, whose, and relative adjectives such as where, why. During ...
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the first time "that anyone can remember"

I found this sentence today - For the first time that anyone can remember the gate of the park was open to the general public. What does the clause that anyone can remember modify? What is the ...
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"which" as relative determiner?

Sentence 1: I was told my work was unsatisfactory, at which point I submitted my resignation. Sentence 2:Sometimes you may feel too frail to cope with things, in which case do them as soon as it is ...
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regarding relative adjective

1: This is the house where my father lived for thirty years. 2: This is the house that my father lived for thirty years. 3: This is the house my father lived for thirty years. Does the above three ...
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Can I replace the relative adjective "where" with "that"?

—Can you believe I had to pay 30 dollars for a haircut? —You should try the barber’s where I go. It’s only 15. In the above sentence, can I replace "where" with "that" or omit it? Can I say "You ...
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Is this a Run-ON Sentence?

Sentence that needs correction : "The Americans and The Bostonians are two Henry James novels , the film versions of which have been as successful as the book versions". Isn't this a run on ...
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of which vs. whose

Would anyone please tell me simply when/ in which situation the followings are the same and interchangeable? and when they are not? - of which - whose Thanks in advance
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is "which" a complement in "which she wanted to be"?

Her sister has become a lawyer, which she wanted to be. In the relative clause, "which she wanted to be", "which" serves as a complement. Is my understanding right? Thank you very much!
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Using the word “received” as both an adjective and a verb

Providing both of these phrases mean the same thing, I am willing to use the word “received” in the first sentence as an adjective. Would you please complete the first one? By carrying out due ...
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In comparison construction, can 'that' be recovered as in relative clause?

[i] This is the watch (that) I lost. [ii] This is the same watch as (that) I lost. It is said accusative relative words can be dropped as in [i]. CGEL saying there are omissions in adjuncts of ...
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The relative pronoun 'which' in this sentence AND the ensuing omssion

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
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Agreement of number in relative clauses

I'm not sure which grammatical number to use in the following sentence from a mathematical text: The points of S whose Galois conjugate lies in the same sub-interval have the same prototile. The ...
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this where and that where

[i] Well, as we reported earlier the chief executive of the Dutch airport where the flight departed says 27 Australians were on board. (ABC news) [ii] There was where Vadinho used to sit on the wall,...
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Can this 'how' be a fused relative?

[A] Behind the flat job figures are changes in how we live now (The Age) Can’t how in above sentence have the function of the fused [free] relative? I mean, can the how have the meaning of ‘the way ...
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2 votes
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Is this an extraposed relative clause?

Sweeping changes to the way Australia delivers welfare have been flagged in a report that calls for thousands to have their disability pensions cut if they can work. (Aussie ABC) [Question 1] This ...
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Relative pronouns (where vs. which)

A relative clause always contains a relative pronoun, as we all know, it depends on the subject of our sentence if it's a thing or a person, or if it contains a possessive adjective, etc... While I ...
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Would you help me with terms of WHOM and WHO? [duplicate]

To whom/who should I address the latter? Am I right? In informal writing, you use who. ..... Moreover, can I use who instead of whom? Furthermore, which one is formal, for instance, about TOEFL ...
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Can I omit the relative pronoun and the verb 'be' in the this sentence? [duplicate]

Can I omit the relative pronoun and the verb 'be' in the this sentence? That is, can: I doubt we presume too far in thinking that by scientific truthfulness, he means proven facts which are not ...
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usage of relative pronoun *which*

I am having a problem in using the relative pronoun which inappropriately. Hence I would like to confirm that the below sentence is a right usage of it. Animals & birds are butchered for food ...
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2 answers
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Combining sentences with “who”

I have to combine sentences in many ways. Could you help me check them please? I was sitting on the bridge. I watched the children. I think it is okay to combine sentences like this. Watching the ...
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relative clause "there is"

"Sunshine, daisies, butter mellow, Turn this stupid, fat rat yellow." He waved his wand, but nothing happened. Scabbers stayed gray and fast asleep. "Are you sure that's a real spell?"...
Listenever's user avatar
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2 votes
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Using the word 'so' like a relative pronoun in its meaning

I came across the following sentence in a book: She could barely keep up with the gas station attendant's directions, he jabbered so. According to the book, the sentence means that the woman ...
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Two semantic interpretaions for 'I've ever seen'

The slim thighs I’ve ever seen. (1) The slimmest thighs I’ve ever seen. (2) Grammatically, the first highlighted part might be called relative clause modifying the previous noun phrase, and the ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Which one of the following is a correct grammatical conclusion?

I am practicing independent writing for TOEFL iBT test. I have read a passage which says that universities should focus more on research. I also have a listing in which the lecturer believes that ...
Marco Dinatsoli's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
275 views

What is the matrix clause of this?

"I accept there's something strange about you, probably nothing a good beating wouldn't have cured –– and as for all this about your parents, well, they were weirdos, no denying it, and the world'...
Listenever's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
414 views

Rule of thumb for joining sentences

I have two sentences: data suffers from some artefacts. this step is needed to reduce effect due to artefacts. I'm struggling to choose the proper clause. In this case, would from which ...
gnp's user avatar
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5 votes
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I am confused over whether to use "what" or "that"

The sentence goes one of these two ways: "He knows WHAT other teachers don't know" or perhaps: "He knows things THAT others teachers don't" Which is better to use - WHAT or THAT? Are they ...
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"From which" or "for which" or […]

I have the following sentences. Object models are reconstructed in the final step. In the final step, two different approaches are basically found: method A and method B. I am not sure about ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Is this grammatical? Nonrestrictive clause with "who"

I want to mention an author's name with his discovery. What would be a smart way to say that: Mr Adam (1808-1882), who first described the properties of "X"... Is this wording grammatically ...
user2378's user avatar
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1 answer
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Would you say "He's someone you'd rather not meet here"?

Is this sentence grammatically acceptable? He is someone you would rather not meet here. Or does it need to be something like this? He is someone who/whom you would rather not to meet here.
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What role does 'something' have?

The rest of the team hung back to talk to one another as usual at the end of practice, but Harry headed straight back to the Gryffindor common room, where he found Ron and Hermione playing chess. ...
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2 votes
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Is there a relative pronoun omitted?

Both Mr. and Mrs. Bacon were looking at Adam now, and he knew he had to make some explanation for letting his good land run free. He said, “I guess I’m a lazy man. And my father didn’t help me ...
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9 votes
1 answer
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Why is the subject omitted?

The class everyone had really been looking forward to was Defense Against the Dark Arts, but Quirrell's lessons turned out to be a bit of a joke. His classroom smelled strongly of garlic, which ...
Listenever's user avatar
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1 vote
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"Which" versus "that" when I can't put off the phrase by comma

John takes a long sling, connects its one end to the cam which is inserted into the hole close by her and connects the other end to the climbing rope. There are many cams. "The cam" refers to a ...
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3 votes
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Is this an emphatic setence?

He [truck driver] held the screen door a little open. "Week–ten days," he said. "Got to make a run to Tulsa, an' I never get back soon as I think." She [waitress] said crossly, "Don't let the ...
Listenever's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
318 views

A modifier or verb tense?

I'm a bit confused about something that looks like a modifier/adjective. "I meant to send you this draft instead of the one I sent you." Does "I sent you" modify (like an adjective) the "one", so ...
jess's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Does this clause follow correct grammar?

I feel that the way I used the verb in the sentence is wrong. Even though I tried to analyse this, I could not figure out the correct way. These are my efforts. The recognition of a global ...
gnp's user avatar
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0 votes
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254 views

For what is this second that-clause placed?

“. . . I’ll bet he killed a man.” She narrowed her eyes and shivered. Lucille shivered. We all turned and looked for Gatsby. It was testimony to the romantic speculation he inspired that there ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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analysis for "such as"

When once more alone, I reviewed the information I had got; looked into my heart, examined its thoughts and feelings, and endeavoured to bring back with a strict hand such as had been straying ...
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