Questions tagged [relative-clauses]

A clause used to join two sentences together, or to provide more information about something.

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2answers
74 views

Is “The way we are learning English is not good” a clause?

Can I call the following a clause? The way we are learning English is not good. Here, what kind of clause is "The way we are learning English" I think it's a noun clause because it sits before ...
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2answers
184 views

Which of these nouns should the verb agree with?

While I understand the basic grammar rules of the verb used in restrictive clauses, I came across many sentences like the example below, supposedly written by a native speaker (?). Disease A is due ...
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3answers
593 views

Is the verb “describe ” intransitive?

Given the text below: Erik believes that personality development is a series of turning points, which he described in terms of the tension between desirable qualities and dangers. I am confused ...
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“After years of uncertainty and upheaval allowed ISIS militants”

After years of uncertainty and upheaval allowed ISIS militants to gain a foothold in the country, the U.S. has begun carrying out airstrikes to try and oust them. Source: http://edition.cnn.com/2016/...
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820 views

Comma before “which” in a sentence

Why should you use a comma before which in this sentence: The fire, which occurred in 1666, destroyed a large part of central London Is an example without a comma incorrect?
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2answers
244 views

“with” preposition at the beginning or at the end of a sentence

Which is correct: This is the most beautiful programming language with that I ever worked! or, This is the most beautiful programming language that I ever worked with!
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170 views

Can “in” come before “where” in this sentence?

Are these two sentences correct? Poverty abounds in where she comes from. Poverty abounds where she comes from.
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4answers
3k views

How to properly combine two sentences by using a relative clause?

I am trying to make a sentence with a relative clause. For example: Some students took the exam. Most of them passed. I think above sentence should be like this. Some students who took the ...
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2answers
4k views

Would it be wrong to write “I'll pay the next time we'll have dinner” instead of “”I'll pay the next time we have dinner"?

I need a little help with the grammar structure being used in this sentence I'll pay the next time we have dinner. Would it be wrong if I write I'll pay the next time we'll have dinner" I ...
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2answers
424 views

Grammar: subordinate clauses

I am trying to improve my English writing skills. I want to say the following sentence to my friend on phone. Is the below sentence grammatically and logically correct? Yesterday late night rain ...
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1answer
63 views

A boy who talks disturbs others

I am really confused about the complex, compound and simple sentences. I am looking for the answer. I read about them on different pages, means I used Google to understand them but all in vain. A ...
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3answers
464 views

Do these 2 sentences have the same meaning?

The sentence below shows age restriction for swimming: The boys who are 16 years old are allowed to swim. What if I write this sentence? Does it have the same meaning? The boys who are allowed ...
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2answers
784 views

that which belongs to or is connected with her

that which belongs to or is connected with her (Merriam-Webster’s Learner’s) 'Though ‘which’ can be replaced by ‘that’ in relative constructions' they say, when it is placed after ‘that’ I wonder if ...
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1answer
590 views

Does this clause follow correct grammar?

I feel that the way I used the verb in the sentence is wrong. Even though I tried to analyse this, I could not figure out the correct way. These are my efforts. The recognition of a global ...
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1answer
363 views

Is this an adjectival or adverbial phrase?

I want to know everything there is to know about you. Does ‘to know about you’ modify everything (adjectival function) or is it an adverbial phrase? Or are both possible?
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How to understand “for whom” structure in a sentence?

From a TED talk, starting at 2:11: In the first, we have animals that display stereotyped, predictable behaviors towards their dead, and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from ...
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Is “where” a relative pronoun or a relative adverb?

He lives in a village where there are no shops. When who, which, where, etc are used in this way, they are called relative pronouns. Michael Swan, Practical English Usage fourth edition, Section 21 ...
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Can we omit “who is” in relative clauses? (noun + noun)

I went down yesterday to the Piraeus with Glaucon the son of Ariston, that I might offer up my prayers to the goddess (Bendis, the Thracian Artemis.); and also because I wanted to see in what manner ...
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86 views

“Which” vs “in which”

What are 'in' in these sentences for? 1. Our algebra class is a heterogeneous one in which bright students are juxtaposed with slower ones. 2. Eulogy is a speech or piece of writing in which you ...
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2answers
167 views

Is 'The something product' equivalent to 'The product of something'?

I was reading the news during lunch, and this sentence in a sports article about Johnny Manziel jumped out at me: The Texas A&M product completed 147 of 258 passes for 1,675 yards with seven ...
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1answer
89 views

a way that most people think {is / it is} wrong

I was reading definition/meaning of the word "perverse" in Oxford Dictionary, came across : showing deliberate determination to behave in a way that most people think is wrong, unacceptable or ...
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3answers
2k views

“This was the first place I ever worked” - or is it “I have ever worked”? Any difference in meaning?

A. This was the first place I ever worked. B. This was the first place I have ever worked. Do you feel any difference in meaning between these? Thanks in advance
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Is this an extraposed relative clause?

Sweeping changes to the way Australia delivers welfare have been flagged in a report that calls for thousands to have their disability pensions cut if they can work. (Aussie ABC) [Question 1] This ...
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1answer
320 views

Using the word 'so' like a relative pronoun in its meaning

I came across the following sentence in a book: She could barely keep up with the gas station attendant's directions, he jabbered so. According to the book, the sentence means that the woman ...
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We are such stuff (as) dreams are made on

We are such stuff (as) dreams are made on Is as optional here? CONTEXT We are such stuff as dreams are made on (Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act 4, scene 1, modernized spelling). In sentences of this ...
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1answer
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Why can’t we drop “The reason” and just say “Why she is still single is because…”?

I know a relative adverb "why" can be followed by a clause and make the clause a noun phrase. It can play a role as an object or a subject in another sentence. For example) I know the ...
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1answer
113 views

“whose foot you stepped on” — can I say “on whose foot you stepped”?

I know the following is okay: The child whose foot you stepped on is fine. Can I also say this? The child on whose foot you stepped is fine. I know that we can place prepositions ...
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1answer
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'a way that no one could have predicted'

Is "that no one could have predicted" a relative clause modifying the noun "way"? Events unfolded in a way that no one could have predicted.
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272 views

relative clause or participle phrase

Today my English teacher(not a native) used the sentence below to introduce the idea of relative clause: People will buy the classics based on her recommendation but sales won't reach the kind of ...
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1answer
80 views

relative structure: with which to

Is the following use of "with which to" correct? Algae will deplete the supply of oxygen with which to sustain fish in the river. I'd appreciate your help.
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648 views

Is “condition” followed by “where” “that”, or “in that”?

The system sounds an alarm when a condition is met where/that/in that the temperature exceeds a preset value. I would like to know which of "where" "that", and "in that" is correct for the above ...
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4answers
2k views

“A group of words that stand together as part of a sentence”--what does “that” refer to?

In the following sentence, do we use "stand" or "stands"? Are we referring to the phrase or to the group of words? A phrase is a group of words that stand together as part of a sentence. What is ...
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1answer
1k views

Using “in that” instead of “in which” [duplicate]

In this sentence: The diet could be prescribed for someone with any disease in which there is an abnormal retention of fluid. Is it correct to replace "in which" with "in that"? Where we could do ...
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1answer
190 views

Omitting prepositions with the relative pronoun “where”

I am having some doubts about the use of "transferred" without its preposition. Does "where" as a relative pronoun always do without prepositions? Shouldn't we say "transferred to"? This ...
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2answers
593 views

Structure of “reason that I was confused”

What kind of structure does the sentence below have? The reason that I was confused is ... Is that I was confused an adjective clause or not? Also we can omit that and say: the reason I was ...
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2answers
19k views

“He is one of those writers who have/has won the Booker prize” [duplicate]

He is one of those writers who have/has won the Booker prize. which is correct: 'has' or 'have'? And why?
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1answer
77 views

Can I dislocate a relative clause

Suppose this sentence Otherwise, if it has an ancestor which encloses the target section, another anchor within the section which shares the same ancestor is required; Can I say it as Otherwise,...
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865 views

on which condition should i use the right word [which,that] which leads to subordinate clause?

I find the bag which you bought yesterday on the desk. I find the bag that you bought yesterday on the desk. Which one is correct? or both are right? I want to know on which condition ...
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1answer
3k views

Gift this to the people whom / who you truly care

Gift this to the people whom you truly care. Gift this to the people who you truly care. The usage of whom and who both goes with the sentence? How do they make the sentence different?
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1answer
254 views

What is the matrix clause of this?

"I accept there's something strange about you, probably nothing a good beating wouldn't have cured –– and as for all this about your parents, well, they were weirdos, no denying it, and the world'...
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19k views

“From which” or “for which” or […]

I have the following sentences. Object models are reconstructed in the final step. In the final step, two different approaches are basically found: method A and method B. I am not sure about ...
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1answer
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Can I use the combination “to-infinitive and relative clause” for the same noun in a row?

Can I use "to-infinitive and relative clause" in a row for the same noun? I have an example about it. The main sentence: The idea to make children happy that I always cared about, is ...
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1answer
27 views

Using a relative clause

Is the following right construction? The one who treats you unfairly, tolerate him. I think this is not accurate. The reason is, as I believe, that the first subject 'the one' has no verb in the ...
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2answers
105 views

What does this “which” refer to in this sentence?

The following sentence is from Il Principe by Niccolò Machiavelli. What does this 'which' refer to in this sentence? And what does this sentence mean? I thought this 'which' might refers to punishment,...
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1answer
49 views

Question about reduced relative clauses: Can “having…” mean both “which had… ” and “which have…”?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered ...
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1answer
160 views

Omit the redundant relative pronoun when using a conjunction

Is it weird to omit the redundant relative pronoun when using a conjunction to connect multiple adjective sentences? Let me explain what I am asking. Example 1: who 1(a). He is a hero who men don'...
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1answer
58 views

Conjunctions, dependent and independent clauses

I have a question about conjunctions, dependent and independent clauses. The issue came up when a text book suggests that "and it" can replace "which/who". But my understanding is that subordinating ...
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1answer
502 views

Relative clause and prepositional phrase

He faced the same difficulty which we had at the airport in finding the direction to the gate. Firstly, I think the entire clause "which we had at the airport in finding the direction to the gate" ...
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1answer
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Relative clauses and What it modifies

I saw this sentence on a book Health can be defined as “[a] state of being associated with freedom from disease and illness that also includes a positive component (wellness) that is associated ...
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1answer
494 views

Do you know (that woman who is talking)? / (that woman talking)?

I just studied about relative clauses and I know that they should tell us which person or thing the speaker means. So when I'm in a conference and a woman is speaking can I ask my friend "Do you ...

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