Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

A "relative pronoun" is a pronoun referring to an earlier noun, sentence, or part of a sentence.

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How to place relative pronoun correctly?

The Thames is a beautiful river. It flows through London Combining these two sentences with relative pronoun: (1) The Thames is a beautiful river, which flows through London. or (2) The Thames, which ...
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Need have with "It’s not what you think it is"

Can someone help me understand the grammar behind the following sentence? It’s not what you think it is. I completely understand the meaning of it. For some reason I thought sentence would be ...
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Is it correct to use the relative pronoun 'that' after the pronoun 'one'

from a band score 9 (the highest) IELTS essay: 'In conclusion, free university education is a must for any country that values equal rights and one that wishes to advance. The cost of free educ...' ...
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Can I omit 'where' from the sentence

This is the house which we live in. =This is the house that we live in. Then the relative pronoun 'that' is omitted. So the sentence becomes: This is the house we live in. Am I correct? Now what if ...
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How can I chose what or that?

It is the high efficiency of the new equipment what/that has increasingly attracted our attention what is differences between what and that in structure of “it is …”?
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Is the pronoun "which" used correctly in the second instance in this text?

Taking into account the location of every word in the next piece of text, I find the use of the word "which" confusing as it is intended to allude to the spinal nerves and not to the ...
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a relative adverb "that" "where". Is it possible to say "the World Cup that..." instead of "the World Cup where..."?

This is the second World Cup in succession that Germany have failed to get out of their group, suffering the same fate in Russia in 2018. This is from BBC sports. https://www.bbc.com/sport/football/...
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What does the 'which' refer to?

We understand that the segregation of our consciousness into present, past, and future is both a fiction and an oddly self-referential framework; your present was part of your mother’s future, and ...
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I don't understand this usage of "as"

One week later Roosevelt embargoed the export of such grades of oil as still were in commercial flow to Japan. I don't understand this usage of "as". Is it the same as "which"? ...
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What is/are the antecedent(s) of the relative pronoun "who" in the following sentence?

In the following sentence, what is/are the antecedent(s) of the relative pronoun "who"? Children include all biological children, legally adopted children, and stepchildren who are ...
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When can we say "the reason why" and "the reason for which" and when only "the reason"? [duplicate]

I'm curious to find out when we can say "the reason why" and "the reason for which" and when only "the reason". Could you explain it to me please? I found some examples: ...
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"..., half of which I don't know the purpose (of)"

So today, I wanted to say to my coworker that half of the items lying on my labmate's desk are something that I don't know the purpose of, so I said this. There are many items on his desk, half of ...
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How to decide if the pronoun in the dependent clause should be included or not?

As far as I know, we should omit the pronoun in the relative clause when the relative pronoun refers to it. For example, we should say: 1 One of the most paramount features of today's life is the ...
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The woman who is singing a song is my teacher VS The woman is my teacher who is singing a song

I want to ask about the positioning of relative clauses: The woman who is singing a song is my teacher. VS The woman is my teacher who is singing a song. I have two questions about this. First, ...
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Incorrect usage of that in relative clauses

I was in a class of relative clauses and, out of context and in order to give an example, I said: I know a man that he lives in London. However my teacher said that using the 'that he' pronouns is ...
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It/these/they (pronouns)

Someone has been calling me all morning Don't worry, these are just spam calls I realize that "calls" are in plular and thus we should use "these/those", but is it possible to use ...
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'That' versus 'Which'

I am preparing for a prestigious examination that opens the doors for becoming a top dog in the government. English plays a vital role in the examination. So, I've started taking lessons from an ...
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"We met the students whom you taught English." Versus "We met the students whom you taught English to."

I am taking classes to improve my English. The instructor and I were going through 'Relative Clauses' this morning, when this particular sentence came up. We met the students who you taught English. ...
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Referring question of the phrase " in this respect" in the following sentence

For the activity of being aware is one of those, like chess in this respect, where understanding their point is itself part of their point. It's seem like the phrase "in this respect" ...
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"…the form that any account must take which invokes…”? What is the antecedent of "which"?

For while it may not show that a reductive mechanistic account is impossible, a proof that we are inescapably embodied agents to ourselves does show the form that any account must take which invokes ...
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Does the word "THAT" in this sentence need to be replaced by the word "WHEN"? "Not a week goes by that I don’t wish I was never born."

This is a sentence from a person's regret about being born. The sentence is: "Not a week goes by THAT I don’t wish I was never born." I understand the sentence, but I am not quite sure about ...
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When there is an embedded clause, is the relative pronoun after it always restrictive?

When there is an embedded clause, is the relative pronoun after it always restrictive? Or, can it be used as a descriptive relative pronoun? For example, is which in the passage used as a descriptive ...
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Is "from which he came" correct? Shouldn't it be "which he came from"? [closed]

The narrator speculates as to which asteroid from which the little prince came. (The little Prince, a novel originally written in French) Do you find this grammar acceptable? I think it should be: ...
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Why can't I grammatically repeat the object with the pronoun "it"?

Someone told me that this sentence is wrong grammatically: Where is the calculator that I lent it to you yesterday? I've read the feedbacks from many people that I shouldn't include "it", ...
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"that/which/who" word choice

She is the perfect accountant which/*who/*that her predecessor was not. This is not the type of modern house which/* that/* ( ) my own is. (CGEL, Quirk et al, 1985, Sec 17.14) Could someone ...
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Can I omit the relative pronoun from this non defining clause

Ram, whom I called yesterday, is a very good boy. Can this sentence be reduced to: Ram, I called yesterday, is a very good boy. My confusion arose after I saw somewhere that the relative pronoun can't ...
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I'm so confused whether these clauses can be reduced or not

We know that defining relative clauses can be reduced. Let's look at some examples. The boy whom I called yesterday knows you. = The boy I called yesterday knows you. (The relative pronoun is ...
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'I think' In Relative clause

Put your clock forward to the furthest it can go which I think is 2025. which relative pronoun is used for 'furthest' and acting as a subject for 'is 2025'. My question is that it's also working as a ...
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Can the subject of a sentence also be its object?

Can the subject of a sentence also be its object? In the sentence, "There came a man who was sent from God," is "man" both the subject of "came" and the object of "...
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what does “which” refer to here?

Mr. Miller 's cost revenue figures paint an inaccurate picture because they do not consider the additional sales taxes from alcohol purchases, only revenue from alcohol excise taxes, the bulk of which ...
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How to use relative pronoun correctly?

This is the example sentence: I take the bus regularly passing by my office, which is fully packed with commuters. In this sentence, I'd like to say that the bus "is fully packed with the ...
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"from whom" or "from who"?

I think that 'who' is not good here because it is in front of a preposition. 'whom' seems to be grammatically ok. A paper I've been reading is written as following. Who? or Whom? which is correct here?...
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relative pronouns, to infinitive, present participle. Are they interchangeable?

Armstrong was the first man who walked on the moon. Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was the first man walking on the moon. Are they all the same? If not, what it the ...
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Those / These / They

Here is a piece of the text I'm writing now: The region was populated by Indigenous Australians who managed to preserve their traditional crafts. They / Those / These included ceramics, leather ...
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antecedent of relative pronoun 'which'

This is from a TIME article. The irony is that despite all of Buterin’s cachet, he may not have the ability to prevent Ethereum from veering off course. That’s because he designed it as a ...
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What is the antecedent of 'which' in this sentence?

Is it a hurricane or the preceding clause, My village was hit by a hurricane? Sometimes it feels it doesn't matter what the antecedent is, just like this case. But I want to know if there is any rule ...
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Interpretation: relative clause after a prepositional phrase

Let's consider the following sentence: He loves these books on a shelf that his dad gave him. I' m a bit confused about the meaning the sentence conveys. To my knowledge, I think this sentence can ...
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"Whoever" or "whomever"

Which of the below sentences is correct? I shall challenge whoever approved of the decision. I shall challenge whomever approved of the decision. The reason for my uncertainty about whether 'whoever'...
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"The friend of John who I hate" vs "John's friend who I hate" [duplicate]

On another language forum, I was told that sentences like, This is John's friend who I hate. This is my car which I've had for two years. etc. are wrong and we should say these instead: This is ...
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Does "which" refer to the Chinese buzzwords or the social changes and cultures?

The Chinese buzzwords usually reflect the social changes and cultures, some of which are increasingly popular with the foreign media. I saw this sentence in an exam. What is the antecedent of " ...
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Verb *be* followed by nominative or accusative case of the pronoun

It is I who need your help. It is me that needs your help. Source Practical English Usage In the first example, the verb be is followed by a nominative case of the personal pronoun and the relative ...
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necessity of 'which' in this sentence

Instead, from his hub at the center of the wheel, he could choose how much attention to give them, as well as which other rim points he wanted to focus on. Instead, from his hub at the center of the ...
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Can I use "those that VERB …" instead of "those who VERB …"?

Can I use "those that VERB …" instead of "those who VERB …"? And if it's true, is it common? I came across following sentence in a blog post. I was doing demos in the PET and ...
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Which clause a preposition belong to matters to determine whether who or whom is used?

In general, both who and whom can be used in the following sentence, although whom may be preferred in strict grammar: I knew who/whom he was talking with. I think in the following sentence, whom ...
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Is it possible to put more than two prepositions before a relative pronoun?

I think the following is OK: I was talking to whom he was looking at. Question: Can I move the 'at' in front of the 'whom'? So the sentence will be: I was talking to at whom he was looking.
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relative pronouns - subject and object used inside the same clause

I would really appreciate if someone could explain this to me. He invented a weapon that was so dangerous that no one dared to use (it). I was certain that there is no need for it here but a friend ...
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For who or For whom

What is the correct usage in the sentence: “I am the one for who / whom the cafe was kept open.” Since who / whom refers to the subject “I”, would the subjective case “who” be correct?
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1. Please tell me the place where you want to visit tomorrow. 2. Please tell me the place which you want to visit tomorrow. Which is correct?

Please tell me the place where you want to visit tomorrow. Please tell me the place which you want to visit tomorrow. Which do you think is more natural or likely to be spoken by native English ...
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his only son that . .

Is the following sentence okay? Does it imply that the person has more than one son? His only son that lives in New York is visiting him this Friday.
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a new material [that] they say is as soft as cotton

Can the relative pronoun "that" be omitted in the following? A group of researchers has developed a new material that they say is as soft as cotton but as strong as Kevlar and as conductive ...
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