Questions tagged [relative-pronouns]

A "relative pronoun" is a pronoun referring to an earlier noun, sentence, or part of a sentence.

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relative pronouns, to infinitive, present participle. Are they interchangeable?

Armstrong was the first man who walked on the moon. Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was the first man walking on the moon. Are they all the same? If not, what it the ...
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Those / These / They

Here is a piece of the text I'm writing now: The region was populated by Indigenous Australians who managed to preserve their traditional crafts. They / Those / These included ceramics, leather ...
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The method by (OR) from which clay roof tiles are made

The method by/from which clay roof tiles are made originated hundreds of years ago. Which preposition is correct and why is it so? Thank you
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antecedent of relative pronoun 'which'

This is from a TIME article. The irony is that despite all of Buterin’s cachet, he may not have the ability to prevent Ethereum from veering off course. That’s because he designed it as a ...
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What is the antecedent of 'which' in this sentence?

Is it a hurricane or the preceding clause, My village was hit by a hurricane? Sometimes it feels it doesn't matter what the antecedent is, just like this case. But I want to know if there is any rule ...
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Interpretation: relative clause after a prepositional phrase

Let's consider the following sentence: He loves these books on a shelf that his dad gave him. I' m a bit confused about the meaning the sentence conveys. To my knowledge, I think this sentence can ...
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"Whoever" or "whomever"

Which of the below sentences is correct? I shall challenge whoever approved of the decision. I shall challenge whomever approved of the decision. The reason for my uncertainty about whether 'whoever'...
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"The friend of John who I hate" vs "John's friend who I hate" [duplicate]

On another language forum, I was told that sentences like, This is John's friend who I hate. This is my car which I've had for two years. etc. are wrong and we should say these instead: This is ...
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Does "which" refer to the Chinese buzzwords or the social changes and cultures?

The Chinese buzzwords usually reflect the social changes and cultures, some of which are increasingly popular with the foreign media. I saw this sentence in an exam. What is the antecedent of " ...
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Verb *be* followed by nominative or accusative case of the pronoun

It is I who need your help. It is me that needs your help. Source Practical English Usage In the first example, the verb be is followed by a nominative case of the personal pronoun and the relative ...
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necessity of 'which' in this sentence

Instead, from his hub at the center of the wheel, he could choose how much attention to give them, as well as which other rim points he wanted to focus on. Instead, from his hub at the center of the ...
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Can I use "those that VERB …" instead of "those who VERB …"?

Can I use "those that VERB …" instead of "those who VERB …"? And if it's true, is it common? I came across following sentence in a blog post. I was doing demos in the PET and ...
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Which clause a preposition belong to matters to determine whether who or whom is used?

In general, both who and whom can be used in the following sentence, although whom may be preferred in strict grammar: I knew who/whom he was talking with. I think in the following sentence, whom ...
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Is it possible to put more than two prepositions before a relative pronoun?

I think the following is OK: I was talking to whom he was looking at. Question: Can I move the 'at' in front of the 'whom'? So the sentence will be: I was talking to at whom he was looking.
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relative pronouns - subject and object used inside the same clause

I would really appreciate if someone could explain this to me. He invented a weapon that was so dangerous that no one dared to use (it). I was certain that there is no need for it here but a friend ...
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For who or For whom

What is the correct usage in the sentence: “I am the one for who / whom the cafe was kept open.” Since who / whom refers to the subject “I”, would the subjective case “who” be correct?
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1. Please tell me the place where you want to visit tomorrow. 2. Please tell me the place which you want to visit tomorrow. Which is correct?

Please tell me the place where you want to visit tomorrow. Please tell me the place which you want to visit tomorrow. Which do you think is more natural or likely to be spoken by native English ...
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his only son that . .

Is the following sentence okay? Does it imply that the person has more than one son? His only son that lives in New York is visiting him this Friday.
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a new material [that] they say is as soft as cotton

Can the relative pronoun "that" be omitted in the following? A group of researchers has developed a new material that they say is as soft as cotton but as strong as Kevlar and as conductive ...
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What does "it" refer to in this passage? [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out what is 'it' referring to in the context of this sentence: Within a week of the opening, it was discovered that nuts and bolts as well as maintenance lamps had been stolen.. ...
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relative pronouns "that" versus "where"

Sentence one: "This is the place that I remember." Sentence two: "This is the place where we first met." Why do we use "that" and not "where" in sentence one? ...
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Is 'all of which accompanies the meaning and goes beyond it' grammatically correct?

In this passage from "Understanding the Subject of a Poem": Instead, people go to the trouble [of writing poetry] because poems sound a certain way, are built in certain shapes, and have ...
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Is 'the same (thing) as (possessive pronoun)...' grammatically acceptable?

Swan's book explains: In short answers we use me, him, etc. (informal) or I, he, etc. with a verb (more formal). The same thing happens after as and than. Informal I've got the same number as him ...
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"His teacher friend Sam helped me a lot." Is it grammatically correct?

Kindly suggest which sentence is most correct. His teacher friend Sam helped me a lot. His friend Sam, a teacher... His friend Sam who is a teacher... Which is the suitable construction?
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When & That difference

A man and a woman are talking on the phone: I'm sorry, but can you please cancel my appointment for today? Sure thing. Is there another day when you can come in? How about Saturday? The morning is ...
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Why is it ungrammatical to put the preposition at the end of the sentence in "preposition+relative pronoun" sentence?

This is my house which I live in. This is my house in which I live. What makes the first ungrammatical here? To me, a non-native speaker, both seem totally fine. Does the first one go against some ...
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Present simple with "that" vs. a participle

I know the subordinate conjunction that is often omitted. Here are two sentences: Select the course containing the exercises you want to repeat. Select the course contains the exercises you want to ...
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What does the "which" refer to in this sentence?

I'm an English learner struggling to decipher the following sentence: To a medical student the final examinations are something like death: an unpleasant inevitability to be faced sooner or later, ...
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What does the "which" refer to in this sentence?

I'm an English learner struggling to decipher the following sentence: To a medical student the final examinations are something like death: an unpleasant inevitability to be faced sooner or later, one'...
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Can "who" function as a conjunction

My teacher told me that "who", in the following, functions as a conjunction. The one who is teaching now is my brother And functions as a relative pronoun in the following: A man who ...
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"which called", "which is called", "which was called"

Which version is better to say? What's the difference among them? I would like to understand the best version for this sentence and also under what circumstances I may use "which called", &...
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Is it correct to say ... "is that when"?

Consider the following sentence: One disadvantage of exams is that students feel really irritated if they mess up one. Is it correct if I change it to this one? One disadvantage of exams is that ...
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People aren’t inanimate features of a building

For example, if you were afraid of standing on balconies, you would start on some lower floors and slowly work your way up(literally) to higher ones. Facing your fears isn’t as easy or tidy when it ...
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Is "that" a conjunction or relative pronoun in the following sentence? [closed]

It comes as no surprise that Taiwan has the highest density of convenience stores in the world. Is "that" a conjunction or relative pronoun in this sentence?
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Do we use preposition + whom and not preposition + who?

According to the Cambridge Dicitonary, in some formal styles, we place the preposition before whom. Mr. Lee, to whom I spoke at the meeting, is very interested in our proposal My question is, can we ...
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What does the ‘that which’ mean here?

This is a paragraph from the English version of ‘Ich und Du’ by Martin Buber published by Bloomsbury on page 19. Can anyone tell me what do the ‘that’ and ‘it’ in ‘with that which meets it’ refer to?
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With whom I have a common class

Can I say "common class" in the context of being in the same class with someone? Like "with whom I have Literature as a common class?"
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by which or in which in this sentence?

I have read a weird selection question on preposition: "September 30 is the day ___ which you must pay your bill". The four given options are: A.by. B.for C.with D.in I cross the ...
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Is "that" being used as a relative pronoun or conjunction in this sentence?

looking for some help on explaining the use of "that" in this sentence. Is it being used a relative pronoun or conjunction in this context? There are so many hot springs that visitors can ...
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Omit relative pronoun

Is this acceptable: The cat I see has a short tail. Or is the “that” necessary The cat that I see has a short tail. I don’t know why, but in past tense it sounds to me as if it was ok. Like: The ...
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what does this who mean in this context?

The following sentence, who wander off the beaten track seems strange to me. Does it mean 'The Internet is full of traps, so the people who seek information often wander off the beaten track? Or does ...
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Can "which" refer to a part of a sentence?

When he went to Japan to meet his friends, he bowed a little to them instead of having handshakes, which is the Japanese way of greeting people. Is this sentence correct? It seems that the "...
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Is relative pronoun 'which' missing?

(1) This has caused a lot of damage to the environment. This damage leads to a loss of biodiversity. (2) This has caused a lot of damage to the environment, which leads to a loss of biodiversity. (3) ...
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How to understand "for whom" structure in a sentence?

From a TED talk, starting at 2:11: In the first, we have animals that display stereotyped, predictable behaviors towards their dead, and for whom much of what we understand about them comes from ...
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Is this relative pronoun correct here?

"And a number of twentieth-century writers have assumed, like Hanslick, that fixed pitches are among the defining features of music. Now it is true that in most of the world’s musical cultures, ...
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usage of demonstrative pronouns

I am writing an article. I have two sentences. The first sentence introduces a thesis. In the second sentence there is a reference to it. Should I use the relative pronoun "this" or "...
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"Percentage of time that.." vs "Percentage of time.."

Which one of the following is grammatically correct? Percentage of time that the system will be available to the users OR Percentage of time, the system will be available to the users
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Should I use who or which? "a nurse is someone who/which always helps sick people." [duplicate]

Is it "a nurse is someone who always helps sick people." or " a nurse is someone which always helps sick people."?
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Doubts on the usage of the pronoun *which*

I have a few questions about the use of the pronoun which. In the sentence: A statistical model is a family of probability distributions of a random variable which is smoothly parametrized by a ...
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When to skip which?

When can I skip the relative pronoun "which" in a sentence? Let's take the following: [...] Where along the long shore, which is full of white sands, the gloom of evening engulfs my heart. ...
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