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A "relative pronoun" is a pronoun referring to an earlier noun, sentence, or part of a sentence.

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Few were cited more often than?

What does this mean, "few...more often than"? YEARS LATER, PHYSICISTS would give wistful looks when they talked about Lorenz's paper on those equations- that beautiful marvel of a paper. "By ...
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Why is “that” used here as the relative pronoun instead of “when”?

This sentence from an article strikes me as somewhat unusual. Since the modified antecedent is a point in time, why is "that" the relative pronoun instead of "when"? I met Jonathan Annicks shortly ...
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which MAKE or which MAKES

Regarding the usage of the relative pronoun "which", after it, do you use singular verb or plural? ”Historic buildings enliven the memories of how people lived in the past, which make each country ...
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Omissions of relative pronouns

We can omit relative pronoun when: The relative clause is non-defining clause, and the pronoun is the subject of the relative clause with a "be" verb (NOT verb to be). My mother, who is an ...
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Use adjective directly instead of using relative pronouns

This sentence is from an article. I don't understand why they use postpositive adjective in this case. The Progressive “Active” formulas contain higher potencies of the key nutrients responsible ...
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Which position for “about” is grammatically correct?

Which one is grammatically correct or better to use? About before pronoun: I haven’t listened to the album about which you were talking. About after verb: I haven’t listened to the album which ...
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Can I remove relative pronoun and keep the punctuation?

Is it ok to remove "whom" in the following sentence? He finally met Paul, whom he had always admired. I personally believe that if I remove both comma and pronoun it would be correct: He ...
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27 views

Is it grammatically correct to repeat object in a relative clause?

Suppose we have the following relative clause: Have you seen those people whom we met on holiday? Is it correct to add a pronoun and change it in the following way? Have you seen those people ...
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Is “it is you that is wrong” correct?

I know that between ”it is you who are wrong” and ”it is you who is wrong”, the former is the correct version. However, if I change who to that, is the same still true? It is you that are wrong. ...
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Is this sentence missing the relative pronoun “that”?

He will support whichever candidate wins. (source) This sentence strikes me as missing a relative pronoun. I thought it should read: He will support whichever candidate that wins. Per relative ...
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the difference between the two in the 'non-restrictive' clause?

what in the first sentence is a relative pronoun in a 'non-restrictive' clause. My gut feeling is which could take the place of what in the sentence. I am not quite sure of my knowledge of the ...
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Whos and thats: always necessary?

Is the inclusion of who or that in the following sentences appropriate? The person (whom) I'm talking with refuses to take no for an answer. My primary school teachers helped mold me into the ...
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Does the ordering of relative clauses matter?

Is this sentence correct with respect to the parts in italics? Is there a better way of saying it? The only person who I know of who speaks English fairly well is my cousin. Here I have two ...
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32 views

What does 'that' refer to in the passage?

What does that refer to in the passage? I think it refers to 'movement' but someone else argues it 'physiology,' which I think makes little sense. Which is right? Let’s go back to our ancestors, ...
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“One of them” vs. “One of which”

Which one is grammatically correct or better? I have two assignments, One of them is done. I have two assignments, One of which is done. I watched a video tutorial that the teacher said the ...
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2answers
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relative pronoun following a name

Recently, I asked whether the restrictive relative pronoun that or the non-restrictive relative pronoun which (plus a comma) should be used following a name: Casa Loma consists of three main ...
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restrictive or non-restrictive relative pronoun?

I am wondering whether the restrictive relative pronoun that or the non-restrictive relative pronoun which (plus a comma) should be used to modify the Hunting Lodge in the following: Casa Loma ...
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Who does 'who' refer to?

Tom plays basketball daily unlike Sam, who is a very busy man Is the above sentence correct? So 'who' always relates to 'Sam' or the nearest noun (& not Tom)?
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What does “itself” refer to in this sentence? and why?

why does itself here refer to "urban life" ?? In the Roman world, the public baths were such an important feature of urban life that in the fourth century A.D., there were 856 small baths in the city ...
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Using that or which after a sentence

Is this sentence correct? "Also we have to share ideas with each other that widens our knowledge" Does this "that" refer to the whole previous statement? Shouldn't we use "this" or "it" after that to ...
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pied-piping in relative clauses [closed]

Are the following relative clauses correct? This is the house which I fixed the door of. This is the house of which I fixed the door. This is the house the door of which I fixed. This is ...
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57 views

I don't want X making Y do Z

I'd be very happy if there is someone who will help me solve these causative with relative constructs: 1) I don't want dwarves get (got?) killed by elves means that: elves make somebody kill ...
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46 views

How can the noun in a sentence get modified by a relative pronoun 'which'?

Like you see in the title, I am wondering if there's a way to make the noun get modified by 'which'. For example, 'An apple is a kind of fruit, which is red.' is this sentence correct grammarly? ...
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Does this sentence have a clear antecedent?

Does their in the following sentence refer only to Chandler and Monika, or is it one of those sentences with an unclear antecedent? In order to celebrate their anniversary, Chandler and Monika ...
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Using who/whom/whose for taking a picture

Which is the best way to ask this question? a. Who did he take a picture of at the party? b. Whom did he take a picture of at the party? c. Whose picture did he take at the party?
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Whom I am teaching?

Is "whom" in that sentence correct? She's a mother of one of my students whom I am teaching on Skype
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“that” vs “which”

Can we use 'that' or “which” to fill in the blank in this sentence? Arteries of the heart ________ are blocked by plaque can reduce the flow of blood to the heart possibly resulting in heart attack ...
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Treatment of the second relative pronoun

I'll appreciate it if a native speaker to especially American English would tell me how you feel and write. This is the only word (that) I know which[that] explains the situation. (A grammar ...
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which versus where in relative clauses

Which of these sentences is correct? 1- We often go to visit our friends in Cambridge, which is not far from London. 2- We often go to visit our friends in Cambridge, where is not far from ...
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everyone I know vs everyone whom I know

I've noticed that a lot of native English speakers leave out pronouns that help modify subjects. Is there any situation in which this: Everyone whom I know is related to me. Is preferred to this: ...
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Which is or Which are?

Could you please check if the following sentence is grammatically correct: "There are a number of reasons for this trend, which is having a significant impact on both family life and on the community ...
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86 views

“Which of those is your cousin?” or “Whom of those is your cousin?”

Which of the following sentences is correct, and why? Which of those is your cousin? Whom of those is your cousin? More generally, do we say "Which of those people?" or "Whom of those ...
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“Never attribute to malice THAT WHICH is adequately explained by stupidity”

The following sentence is part of a famous saying called Hanlon's razor: Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity I'm confused by the "that which". Why do you need ...
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Which vs. Whose

Which of the following sentences is correct? "These kind of branding strategies are adopted by those firms and organisations whose sales are decreasing day by day. Or "These kind of branding ...
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Is “where” a pronoun here in this sentence and is it ok to use it in this way?

"In March, an armed group known as Los Viagras — apparently named for the way their leader's heavily moussed hair stands up — wreaked havoc by burning dozens of vehicles andeffectively shutting down ...
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Can “NO+noun” serve as the subject of a relative pronoun clause?

The two objects have no contact that causes friction. I created the sentence above to say that the two objects do not touch each other, so there is no friction between them. I wonder which of "no ...
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“I spent two years in this place and {it was/they were} the two worst years of my life.”

On reddit, one person said: I spent two years in this place and it was the two worst years of my life. I'm concerned about it was part. Is it correct? If not, would the following be correct? I ...
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Relative pronouns

1) Tet is a festival. Tet occurs in late January and early February. => Tet is a festival which occurs in late January and early February. 2)While another example is Mrs Brown is my aunt. She is ...
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Whose name vs. The name of whom

The book whose name is "Manwatching" is written by Jellison. Or The book the name of which is "Manwatching" is written by Jellison. EDIT: After reading the comments below, I've revised the ...
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“Where” as a relative pronoun

I came across this sentence when reading a blog: "My aspiration is to have a fulfilling life where, when i am 60 years old, i can look back and feel happy about the richness of it all." It seems ...
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Is this the relative non-restrictive clause?

I don't think that this the relative non-restrictive clause, but why is there the comma before which? Hobby drones appear in all shapes and sizes, which sometimes makes the process of finding the ...
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Sentences with “whichever”

I met a new word today. It's whichever. I kinda understood how to use it but I'm still confused in some situations. For example this one: Whichever way you look at it (in?), it's a sad situation. ...
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Convoluted relative pronoun sentece structure

sentence: There is a common European myth to which both authors referred subconsciously in the books in question. How can I split this sentence into two? There is a common European myth. Both ...
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What is the difference in meaning between using object pronoun and relative pronoun in these sentences?

Here are the sentences: She has three brothers, two of whom are in the army. I read three books last week, one of which I really enjoyed. If I use object pronouns instead: She has three ...
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Reducing “a relative pronoun + verb”

The man (who is) angry is my father. I was taught that I cannot reduce "who is" in the sentence. But, I don't understand why it does not make sense without "who is". To me, "The man angry is my ...
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Omitting a relative pronoun

It is not generally acceptable but sometimes reading a book difficult to understand is good to improve intellectual thinking. It is not generally acceptable but sometimes reading a book that is ...
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2answers
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'the back' or 'in the back'?

I traveled in a truck the back of it the owner had loaded with potatoes. In this sentence, the book says we have to use 'which' instead of 'it'. I understand that, but I think there should be 'in' or ...
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How should I parse and understand the following sentence (“…, … of which …”)?

From MSDN - IDispatch::GetIDsOfNames method: rgDispId Caller-allocated array, each element of which contains an identifier (ID) corresponding to one of the names passed in the rgszNames ...
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Sentences with (noun+adjective+preposition) structure

I found these two sentences He is a man suitable for any post. **The subject is a matter worthy of note. Why is there no relative pronoun and be verb between the noun and the adjective? What are the ...
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Use of 'of that'

I came across this line This is the boy that I told you of. Can I use 'of' with 'that' in this way: This is the boy of that I told you. Can I also replace 'that' with 'whom' in this way: ...