Questions tagged [responses]

For inquiries about the grammar, and phrasing of responses.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
34 views

In what question(s), I can reply a past perfect tense answer?

Can a simple past tense question have a past perfect tense answer? Q: Did you eat? A: Yes, I had eaten. Is the above correct? As I wonder if a past perfect tense can solely exist without a simple ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

Answering a “why” question formally [closed]

How do you answer a "why" question formally (e.g. in an exam paper) For example: "Why are checks and balances needed in a government, especially its legal system?" Do you start the ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

What is the correct way to reply “What is the XXX”?

What is the correct way to reply “What is the most expensive food in the market”? Should I say: The most expensive food is banana. The banana is the most expensive food. A banana is the most ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Correct response to “Has he lost his keys?”

imagine a situation when someone lost their keys but after some time he has found them. What would be the correct response to this question? "Has he lost his keys?" Options: "No, he ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“He is” or “It is”

I'd like to know how to begin the answer to the following question. Who is the actor that played an action hero in Speed, a cyber-criminal in The Matrix, a killing machine in John Wick, and who’s now ...
2
votes
1answer
550 views

a short answer on a question “Could you wait for a moment?”

Is it right that on a question: "Could you wait for a moment, please?" I can't say: "I could", only "I can" because "could" in my answer will be about the past. ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Is “He was eating.” a complete sentence to a question? [closed]

Is “He was eating.” a complete sentence to the question “What is Stacey eating?”
0
votes
2answers
87 views

Respond to Apology

If someone apologises for being late, is it pragmatically correct to respond as follow? Student: Good morning Mr. Anderson, I’m sorry I’m late! Teacher: Yes, I can see! So why are you late? I mean, ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Correct response for “Do you mind?” [closed]

What is the proper response for "Do you mind?"
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Should I say “I'm going to see” or “I'm going to”?

In the following situation: --Have you gone to see the doctor? --No, but_______. Should I say "I'm going to see" or "I'm going to"? I feel like the former one makes more sense, ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

Yes/no answer on a specific statement

A is 178cm tall, and here is the conversation between A and B. A: I am 180cm tall B: yes/no, that’s nearly true. Are both yes and no acceptable? If not, what does whether yes or no is suitable depend ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Answer to the question of “Mind if I ~? ”

Q1. I saw this dialogue in a book: A: "Mind if I see your notebook?" B: "Sure." In this context, "Sure" was used to mean "I don't mind, go ahead." Right? But ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

respond to “I hope I'm successful!”

One of my friends who has applied to a university told me "I hope I'm successful!". How can I respond to that? Is it correct to say "I'm sure you will be fine"? Any better ...
2
votes
2answers
617 views

What should I say in response to “I hope next year is better”?

How should I reply to this statement without using a bland "me too"? I want the conversation to keep going past this, but I'm not sure how to respond well.
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Response to “How you doing?”?

What is a natural response to "Good to see you. How you doing?"? Will a natural response include "doing" as in "I'm doing okay" or will "I'm okay" be more ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Is “Don't be” correct as a response to “I am sorry”?

I heard someone saying "Don't be" in response to "I am sorry". I wonder whether it is correct. Some native speakers said it was a mistake, however, some said it was correct. Is ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

What's the difference between saying “not so much” and “no I don't”?

What's the difference between saying "not so much" and "no I don't"? For example: Q: Do you like horror movies? A1: Not so much. A2: No I don't.
0
votes
0answers
66 views

When my supervisor tell me do something, can I reply by done?

I am writing a text with my supervisor, and when he put a remark to correct it, can I answer by done ? that's mean yes I do it.
0
votes
2answers
33 views

Tell me as a response

if someone ask your opinion just with your name, is it rude to answer “tell me”? For example, during a meeting, your boss exposes an idea and just say, Mely?is it rude just answering tell me
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Sarcastic response

Context: Someone has behaved in a very bad way at work and wants to apologize for it a few days later. He's talking to a coworker of his. Person: I hope you can forgive me. I bought some chocolates to ...
1
vote
2answers
40 views

Don't answer a question using another tense, do you?

Is it a right thought that we don't answer questions using another tense because it's maybe not only grammatically incorrect but also it's not very polite to do that, isn't it? For example, someone ...
0
votes
1answer
529 views

How to politely respond when someone calls your name?

I found the following example in Genesis 22:1: Some time later God tested Abraham and said to him, “Abraham!” “Here I am,” he answered. Is "here I am" considered as a polite response when ...
-2
votes
1answer
68 views

Is it OK to say “I am Nathan, I am smart, I am nice” in English in answer to “Who are you?”? [closed]

Is it ok to answer, "I am smart, I am kind, and I am strong" to the question, "Who are you?"?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

What do you say when someone one points at you and says there it is and you never met them before and it wasn't you

What do say when someone one just walks up to you and points and says there it is and you never met them before and it wasn't you?
0
votes
1answer
130 views

What is the more proper alternative to “my bad”?

When people admit mistakes they tend to use the phrase "my bad". I found that it is an informal way in North America. Could anyone help me with a better alternative?
18
votes
9answers
7k views

Is it OK to respond to “thanks” with “sure”?

When someone says ..., thanks. Is it appropriate to respond with sure If so, in which situations it would be OK, and what exactly would it imply?
2
votes
2answers
52 views

Of course I will to a negative sentence

If you say to someone "I hope you won't stop checking in on her" And this person answers "Of course I will" Does it mean "Of course I won't stop" ?
-1
votes
2answers
37 views

“How aware are managers of …” vs “How managers are aware of …?” Any difference in Asking and Replying?

Asking: A1 How aware are managers of employee attitudes and behaviours? A2 How managers are aware of employee attitudes and behaviours? Replying: R1 Managers are very well aware of ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

What is English equivalent for Russian “я хочу” in the meaning “я хочу посмотреть их сегодня вечером”?

The context is: Have you looked my links? я хочу (я хочу посмотреть их сегодня вечером). Is it possible to use short answer? (i want, i wish) and also is it possible to say "i will" in some ...
0
votes
1answer
952 views

How to respond to 'Would you like to come with us?'

Would you like to come with us? Oh, sure. I'd love to. It is from our OXFORD student book. So my question is Can students just answer 'I'd love to.' , 'Sure.', 'OK.' or 'That sounds great!'? ...
-1
votes
2answers
78 views

What a granny is supposed to say to respond to “Thank You”?

A post gives "8 Ways to Respond to Thank You". I didn't find one is appropriate the following situation. Imagine that, a granny prepares a breakfast for her grandson. Grandson: thank you, granny. ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

“Have you got to” vs. “Do you have to”

The sentence is: I have got to wait for the bus. Now if my friend wants to ask me about it, First question is: What would the question be? Have you got to wait for the bus? Do you have ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

“you are?” vs “are you?” when asking for confirmation

I've just realized, for the nth time, that after someone says ...I'm past it the interlocutor replies You are? I hope I'm right in saying that this is, strictly speaking, wrong, as the ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

Short answers - 'In Tokyo' v 'Tokyo'

This issue arose in a recent lesson. In short, it centres on the difference between: Where do you live? I live in Tokyo. v In Tokyo. v Tokyo. and: Which city do you live in? I live in Tokyo?...
12
votes
4answers
6k views

Can we say or write : “No, it'sn't”?

I know we can answer either : No, it's not No, it isn't But is it accepted and understandable to write : No, it'sn't What about saying it ?
1
vote
2answers
13k views

Responding to ‘Is the price negotiable?’ [closed]

I have been selling some stuff on Gumtree, and nearly every potiential buyer has messaged me asking if my prices are negotiable. What are some common, idomatic responses native speakers use to ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

If my teacher ask me this, which is the right way to answer it? [closed]

Q : Are these books borrowed by you yesterday? A1 : Yes, these books are. A2 : Yes, these are. What is difference between A1 and A2?
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Is the correct response “here you are” or “here you have”?

If the question is: Would you give me a leaflet in Russian, please? Which answer is correct? Yes, here you are madam. or Yes, here you have, sir.
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Is an interrogative sentence like “So did you?” or “So is she?”, possible?

A: Mike came here yesterday. B: Possible responses: (1) Did you, too? (2) So did you? Instead of saying, "Did you come here yesterday, too?", can you say, (1) "Did you, too?" and (2) "So did you?"? ...
4
votes
3answers
39k views

Answer to the question “where have you been?”

How should I answer the question "where have you been"? Should a possible reply be "I've been cleaning the garden." or "I was cleaning the garden."? I mean should I use 'present perfect tense' or '...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

What's the deadline? A short answer

Is the following question-response pair natural? A: What's the deadline? B: By May 3rd. I know "by" is redundant, but redundancy does not mean unnaturalness. Is the reply natural with it? I'...
1
vote
1answer
119 views

What is the structural (positive or negative) answer for “Is this a courgette”?

I know that when answering on an question with a structure of interrogative structure, then there is a short structural answer which based on the tense or the lexical verb that the questioner asked. ...
-1
votes
4answers
1k views

answering “Yes” or “No” for a question “She doesn't hate me, right?”

I am not a native English speaker. It is very confusing how to answering "Yes." or "No." for a negative question with "right?" added at the end. Tom: She doesn't hate me, right? Tom's Friend: ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

Is it correct to use name or brand between “the” and “one”?

If there is a question: Which camera do you want? (in this case only the owner's name differentiating them) Can it be answered: We want the Cindy one?
2
votes
2answers
992 views

Answering question with yes or no

if someone asks me "Hasn't it been decided yet?" and if it hasn't been decided should I answer with: Yes (it hasn't been decided yet.) or No (it hasn't been decided yet.)
2
votes
1answer
81 views

Have I read the novel if I've forgotten the story?

Imagine the following scenario: I read a novel two years ago. Today I cannot remember the story of the novel any more, I've forgotten the story. Somebody asks me: Have you read the novel? ...
1
vote
1answer
877 views

Is the sentence “No, animals are allowed.” grammatically correct?

I understand very well that a phrase like "No animals are allowed." is correct English. It means animals are forbidden; they aren't allowed. But imagine a place or an organization where ...
1
vote
1answer
716 views

What are some appropriate responses to the speaker who told you that her birthday was yesterday

I would like to thank you userr2684291 and FumbleFingers for their help on my previous post (I have deleted it because I don't want them to get into any trouble). (I was doing some English learning ...
1
vote
1answer
3k views

Reply to “How are you?” : Are “I'm thirsty” “I'm hungry” “I'm angry” etc. okay?

When someone asks you "How are you?" the expected or usual reply (I assume) would be "I'm fine" "Not bad" "As usual" etc. Instead, is it okay to give a more specific and honest reply of your current ...
11
votes
2answers
12k views

What are some polite ways to respond to the people who call your name but you don't know them

I was waiting for the elevator to arrive at the ground floor and a man called my name. I turned to him and saw him looking at me but I could not recognize him. I was surprised because I did not ...