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Questions tagged [semantic-roles]

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the syntax and the semantics of the word 'flat' in the sentence

If they get a chance to lay their eggs, we are going to have everything eaten flat with hoppers later on. Context: People are trying to stop locusts to land on their farms. So they suppose that they ...
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Take oneself by the collar

Others can see the difficulty, but the boy must take himself by the collar and make himself cultivate a poise and calm that smothers the fidgets. What does "take oneself by the collar" mean?...
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2 answers
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Has the preposition "in" been omitted in the following sentence?

While reading a book about Programming Languages, I saw the following highlighted paragraph: Default values, optional segments, and catchall segments all increase the range of URLs that a route will ...
Hossein Dara's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
41 views

Denotation and connotation of the phrase

As doctors often do, I took a trial shot at it as a point of departure. "Has she had a sore throat?" In English, we can understand this very easily but very difficult to explain "trial ...
Abid's user avatar
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Structure and function of the sentence

She felt unreal as the voice informed her of the subway accident - the shoving crowd, Arthur pushed from the platform in front of the train. It is a sentence of a short story, Button, Button, by ...
Abid's user avatar
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1 answer
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Roles of objects and subjects

I am trying to understand the roles of subjects (agentive, identified, characterized, affected, etc) and roles of objects (affected, resultant, eventive, recipient). Example 1: Having finished their ...
Paul George's user avatar
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1 answer
75 views

Semantic role of subjects of predicatives

Consider the below sentences, all of which contain a subject, a verb, and a predicative. The door felt cold. He is tall. She's got taller. What is the semantic role of the subjects in these ...
Eric's user avatar
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1 answer
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On opening a sentence with the (quasi-)command, "Look..."

It's quite common, especially in spoken English, to hear someone begin an explanation with the word, "Look". For example, on US cable news and the like, we often hear an exchange something ...
tkp's user avatar
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What is the function/ part of speech of "welcoming many visitors?"

What is the function/ part of speech of "welcoming many visitors" in the sentence below? The United States is flinging its doors wide open to vaccinated international travelers on Monday, ...
Anna's user avatar
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2 answers
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Looking to name a specific semantic relation

When one makes a choice, he is faced with some alternatives: "go by car" or "go by bus"; "prefer sightseeing" or "go shopping", "buy a house" or "...
vivasra's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Please post good answers- is it a request or an order?

Please post good answers Is the above sentence an order or a request? Since it is an imperative, it may be an order. Since the sentence begins with please, it seems to be a request. I think it is ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
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1 answer
318 views

John stopped to talk to me/ stopped talking to me

David stopped to talk to me John stopped talking to me The explanation given in the material supplied by The English and Foreign Languages is like this. David stopped on the way so that ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
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1 answer
143 views

I suffered with my wife?

I referred to many dictionaries and found that the verb suffer is not followed by the preposition with I have found the following sentences. 1. I suffered from fever. 2. One has to suffer for ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
673 views

John could drive the car

John could drive the car. The car could be driven by John The second sentence is the passive form of the first sentence. But I have read in a book for teaching methodology that the two sentences ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

I have applied for leave of absence today/ for today

I have applied for leave of absence for today. I have applied for leave of absence today. I think there is some difference in meaning between the two sentences. I think the sentence 1 means ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
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2 answers
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Non-consciously VS Un-consciously

I have seen the following sentences in standard English study materials 1. Native English speakers acquire the language non-consciously. 2. Native English speakers acquire the language un-...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
436 views

Is “to infinitive” a myth?

Let us observe the following examples I want to speak to you I am looking forward to seeing you I am interested to learn English In the sentence 1 we say "to speak” is a to infinitive and to as a ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
17 votes
3 answers
2k views

Does a code snippet compile? Or does it get compiled?

I was completely surprised that the following snippet compiled and worked in both Visual Studio 2008 and G++ 4.4. The following code does not compile: By coding rigidly to the spec, you can ...
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
6k views

“I have been doing this job” vs “since I am doing this job”?

I am really confused about these two sentences: 1:- I have been doing this job for 10 years. 2:- It has been 10 years since I am doing this job. Whether or not these sentences are same, if ...
Adnan Umar's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
635 views

Should vs. Shouldn't

They believe this. Should they? Shouldn't they? Do the both replies mean the same?
Sasan's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
4k views

"should They?" or "should they be?"?

They believe this. Should they? They are taken as believing this. Should they? While (1) sounds fine, something seems to be off with (2). Shouldn't it be "should they be?" in (2)? Is "...
Sasan's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
139 views

Structure of “need something back”

What is the structure of the following sentence? I need my history book back. What is the grammatical role of the word "back"?
Mohammad Afrashteh's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
3k views

What is the grammatical role of the word "either" in the following sentence?

What is the grammatical role of "either" in the following sentence: Nevertheless, a goal is seldom destroyed by a delay, so don't destroy your positive attitude, either.
Mohammad Afrashteh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
13k views

There has been vs There had been

How and where should we use "There has been" and "There had been"? For example, I cannot recognize the semantic difference between the two following sentences: There had been such a fortunate ...
Mohammad Afrashteh's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
6k views

Is this correct?- He is still working here for the last 3 years

Is the below sentence correct? He is still working here for the last 3 years. Without a second thought, I typed in an important form as below- He has been & still working here for the last ...
CuriousMind's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
87 views

Is it syntactically and semantically correct to say "Too many open windows."

As a response to a complaint about the coldness of a room if we reply with saying "Too many open windows." will it be syntactically and semantically correct? Or do we need to say "Too many opened ...
Tokugava's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
129 views

Connotation behind "forking possibilites"

"Every time you make a choice, a decision, the reality forks off into a new possibility. " - The OA What would you imagine under those words? Does "forking" connote rather with the process of [a ...
Probably's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
264 views

What does "jerk awake to dwell on something" mean?

Harry dozed fitfully, sinking into dreams full of clammy, rotted hands and petrified pleading, jerking awake to dwell again on his mother's voice. Harry potter and the prisoner of Azkaban Harry ...
dbwlsld's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
166 views

What's the role and meaning of "of" in "It happened in a flash of steely talons"?

It happened in a flash of steely talons; Malfoy let out a high pitched scream and next moment, Hagrid was wrestling Buckbeak (A magical creature which has talons) back into his collar as he strained ...
dbwlsld's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
53 views

What is the phrase "its articulation" connected to?

This constitutive element of the modern world (man, as the producer of rational hypotheses) and (1) its articulation with (2) the ideology of techno-scientific progress and (3) the development of the ...
DeborahJeong's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
99 views

What's the role and meaning of "how" here?

"What are you talking about?" said Harry. "The diary," said Riddle. "My diary. Little Ginny's been writing in it for months and months, telling me all her pitiful worries and woes - how her ...
dbwlsld's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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the computer demonstrated the app?

Does "The computer demonstrated the app" sound wrong or otherwise unnatural? If so, why? I'd think the sentence describes an automatic process whereby the computer was programmed to demonstrate the ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
161 views

What is the role of "too much" here?

Harry swallowed. Mr. Ollivander : "I think we must expect great things from you, Mr. Potter... After all, he-who-must-not-be-named did great things - terrible, yes, but great." Harry ...
dbwlsld's user avatar
  • 3,471
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Semantic differences between "As fast as light" and "as fast as the light"

Is there any semantic difference between these sentences? Does the article makes any difference? As fast as light can go and, As fast as the light can go
Renan's user avatar
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1 answer
788 views

"It" as a pronoun for event

By definition, the word "it" is used in placed of a thing or situation mentioned beforehand. My questions is - can "it" serve as the pronoun for an event such as birthday party, award ceremony or ...
JUNCINATOR's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
7k views

What is the subject in the sentence "Rice is being cooked by Mary"?

I know it's a very basic question, and I've looked up the definition of "subject." This very question was asked within a linguistic course that I am taking, the answer to which is apparently rice (see ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
639 views

Difference in meaning of adjectives ended with -ed and -ing?

English has two kinds of participial adjectives: ending in -ed: I am disappointed. ending in -ing: It's disappointing. They seem to mean different things. How I can explain the difference ...
ms.crystal's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
2k views

if you don't forget all about her -- does "all" mean "everything" or "forget completely"?

Example with a context (YouTube link): I drove slowly back to the office. The telephone was ringing when I arrived at the office. I went in quickly and answered it. "Samuel speaking." "Listen, ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar