Questions tagged [semantics]

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21 views

the whole is wide in one part?

Bicycles are parked where the sidewalk is wide. The sidewalk is wide here. If I want to say bicycles are parked on the wide part of the sidewalk or this part of the sidewalk is wide, are they ...
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1answer
30 views

It was one of a few houses (that were) (fully) built?

It was one of a few houses (that were) (fully) built. I want to say that the house was done, does just built mean that or should it be fully built ? and is that were necessary or optional?
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43 views

What does “Therapist and client relationship” mean?

What does "therapist and client relationship" mean? And is there a short description for it or synonym? B:‘’My mother mentioned you, often.’’ A: ‘’Strange, she never mentioned you to ...
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34 views

“Right” Answers in the IELTS Reading Section

Friends, My concerns are about the suggested answers of the Reading section in the Official IELTS 14 Practice book. I'm providing the context, question(s) in concern and it's official answer. the ...
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2answers
29 views

Case that is philosophically right or wrong, but semantically wrong

If we see that there is a red apple, but someone says 'we see that there is a red apple, but it's green.' Then, is it semantically wrong?
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45 views

Subtle impatience with “would”?

In her work, Sabine forgot to check the validity of some figures. Robert, one of her colleagues reviewing her work before approving it, wrote in his remarks: "Wouldn't we need to check the ...
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1answer
34 views

How do I know when to use the perfect infinitive and simple infinitive?

Most of the time they have the same meaning as in: It was stupid of me to say anything on Twitter It was stupid of me to have said anything on Twitter Luis deserved to earn that promotion Luis ...
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1answer
6 views

Using “the” with past participle but not with the present participle

I am currently working on a book review of verb presentation in two texts. I am contemplating the nominal function of present participles. Of course, we know that a present participle is called a ...
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1answer
12 views

Is this sentence a contradiction in terms?

The sentence is "The amendment has the effect of disqualifying the unqualified" Is it accurate to call the amendment a contradiction in terms?
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36 views

What is the semantic difference between everybody and anybody in `doing` context?

Please explain what should I choose for what context in the following examples: it lets everybody do whatever they want it lets anybody do whatever they want What is the semantic difference?
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2answers
40 views

“high-tech hubris”

For office innovators, the unrealized dream of the ‘paperless’ office is a classic example of high-tech hubris. Today’s office drone is drowning in more paper than ever before. Then the “high-tech ...
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1answer
41 views

Looking to name a specific semantic relation

When one makes a choice, he is faced with some alternatives: "go by car" or "go by bus"; "prefer sightseeing" or "go shopping", "buy a house" or "...
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1answer
15 views

What is the difference between “criteria of” and “criteria for”?

The criteria of 'dog-ness' are the following... The criteria for an animal to be a dog are the following... Are both phrases correct and, if so, what's the difference between them? Are 'of' and 'for' ...
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32 views

usage: scarcely any

In the following sentences, the use of "any" seems correct in the first sentence but incorrect in the second. Do you know why? Scarcely any space occupied by John is clean. The porky fellow ...
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1answer
24 views

Can 'hardly' convey two opposite meanings based on its location in a sentence?

Is there a semantic difference between these two sentences? I defended the case quite hardly. vs. I hardly defended the case. For my understanding, these two sentences have an opposite ...
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36 views

Whether this sentence is grammatically and semantically correct? [closed]

Indian constitution is not as flexible and rigid as British constitution and American constitution respectively.
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65 views

meaning: may well V

In the following exchange, "you may well ask" is used after a question has been asked. ‘What’s all the noise?’ ‘You may well ask.’ But I'm wondering whether "may well V" is normally used after the ...
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2answers
59 views

Why is “was” here? HTML5 was the fifth and last major version of HTML

HTML5 was the fifth and last major version of HTML that is a World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) recommendation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML5 Why is it "HTML5 was" instead of "HTML5 is"? What ...
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7k views

What class are you studying?

It is a tendency among teachers of English in India to ask and teach sentences of this kind in the class. What class are you studying? Inwhich class are you studying? ...
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1answer
64 views

I thought/ didn't think you were/ not coming

We usually say : I don't think he will pass. Not I think he will not pass. I didn't think he was coming. But not I thought you were not coming. I know that it is called ...
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1answer
23 views

If a sentence is quashed, does it mean that there's no sentence at all anymore?

If a sentence is quashed, does it mean that there's no sentence at all anymore (i.e. the convicted is acquitted) or, if a sentence is only reduced or, say, replaced with probation, the word's ...
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19 views

Does the verb 'apply' necessarily imply that you ask that something be given to you? Can it be used if there's no direct personal gain?

For example, if a person or some nonprofit sends implicating information to a law enforcement agency and requests that company A should be investigated and, if found guilty, punished because they ...
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1answer
77 views

The school is open from 10 A.M to 5 P.M

I know that open is an ergative verb and it can be used transitively and intransitively and open is also an adjective. The school opens at 10 A.M and closes at 5 P.M. The school is opened at ...
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58 views

'non-been Being'

The word 'being' can mean 'creature' or 'as' (i.e: 'being / as a rich man'). What is the meaning of 'non-been Being' exactly? . Is this ambiguous?
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154 views

To infinitive VS bare infinitive

He made me laugh(active) I was made to laugh by him(passive voice) In the active voice made is followed by personal object and bare infinitive. But in the passive voice made is followed ...
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6k views

Is “Ram married his daughter” ambiguous?

Ram married his daughter is ambiguous because: Marry means marry somebody to become a spouse. The second meaning is perform the marriage ritual as a priest. So, if Ram is a priest he can marry his ...
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418 views

The clerk concerned VS the concerned clerk

I want to meet the concerned clerk I want to meet the clerk concerned According the grammar book by David Green the first sentence means I want to meet the clerk who is tense or ...
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2answers
98 views

He left her a widow

He left her a widow. I think this sentence is ambiguous. The possible meanings are: 1. He died and she became a widow. 2. He kept a widow in her care. Could you please analyze the sentences and ...
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112 views

You must have mended your shoes

Your shoes are shining: You must have mended your shoes. You must have your shoes mended. This was the question given in an examination. Most students and some teachers found the ...
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2answers
61 views

Not all language tests are of the same kind

Not all language tests are of the same kind. All language tests are not of the same kind I think both the sentences mean the same thing though they are syntactically different. What is the part ...
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713 views

I want to make friendship with you

I know that to make friends with somebody is idiomatic in English. But in India I hear people saying I want to make friendship with you I think native speakers do not accept make friendship with ...
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910 views

Semantics (English linguistics): “words as containers of meaning”

I have a big doubt... I’m taking an english linguistics course and I don’t understand this section of the book :( There would be any person who already finished this subject would explain me. It is ...