Questions tagged [sentence-structure]

A complete sentence contains at least a subject and a verb, with all of the words being used in the sentence arranged in such a way that they express a complete thought.

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Can I add an object to the preposition in "sites that are more challenging to extract resources from"? What about removing "from" entirely?

I hate the sites that are more challenging to extract resources from their inside. (I made this sentence.) I know people would normally say the following version: I hate the sites that are more ...
ForOU's user avatar
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there are a lot of people from them on the committee

Local businesses are well represented on the committee (= there are a lot of people from them on the committee). Source: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/represent?q=...
Englishgood's user avatar
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without approval for more US military assistance from Congress in the coming weeks

Ukrainian cities will be vulnerable to Russian missile attacks this winter without approval for more US military assistance from Congress in the coming weeks, White House officials have warned. ...
Englishgood's user avatar
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such lots of OR so lots of

which is the correct structure and why? I found it while I was reading Cambridge Grammar in use intermediate on page no. 204 it says 'such' should precede 'a lot of'. so can we use 'such' before 'lots ...
hwkal's user avatar
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"With X equals 3" vs. "With X equal to 3"

I found several teachers using the first structure, i.e. "with X equals 3", while some others using the second one, and all of them are native English speakers. Here're some examples of the ...
Tran Khanh's user avatar
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5 answers
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Why do commit title sentences start with an infinitive without to?

I am a developer and I am not native English speaker. When I see commits I can't understand why titles for them start with infinitive without to. For example from Spring commits Add missing runtime ...
Pavel_K's user avatar
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correct usage with transitional words

a) She made many poor choices, for example, drinking too much alcohol. Is this sentence grammatically accurate? It makes sense but as a rule of thumb if the transitional word 'for example' is removed,...
bluebell1's user avatar
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3 answers
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'One such+noun' vs 'such a/an + noun'

What's difference in meaning and usage of 'such a/an + noun' and 'One such + noun'?. For example:- I have never seen such an example of government turning its back on illegal activity.” Never before ...
Zaman Nipu's user avatar
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Dogs are different colors

(1) Dogs are different colors. (2) The dog is the color yellow. (3) Dogs are of different colors. I don't know why (1) is possible (possibly because my native language is Japanese). (1) looks as ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
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1 answer
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I received a phone call from [closed]

I received a phone call from the school but the call got disconnected so I want call back to ask who call me, also I think the HR department but I don’t know how to make the sentence
Ibrahim Gerges's user avatar
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What structure/grammar point is this?

"Several disturbing dreams had given me a restless night, though I could only remember them vaguely. In one dream I recall shouting at someone and being involved in a fight. There was also ...
hhhh's user avatar
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What does this sentence on BBC means: ""All baa myself: Is this Britain's loneliest sheep?"

All baa myself: Is this Britain's loneliest sheep? BBC - Britain's loneliest sheep What does "All baa myself" mean? I couldn't quite understand it.
yunus's user avatar
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interpretation of this sentence [closed]

In this humorous conversation : A: Cows kill more people than sharks. B: I'm surprised cows kill any sharks at all. Is interpreting A's sentence the way B did really natural?
qna's user avatar
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Why does this sentence have the word "...again...": "The world's largest Eagle, stellar sea eagle, a third as big again as a golden

"The world's largest Eagle, stellar sea eagle, a third as big again as a golden." BBC-SEA EAGLE (see:1:53-1:58) I got confused by this sentence. As far as I understand, the sentence means &...
yunus's user avatar
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Difference between: "This is as fast as it goes." VS "This is the fastest it can go."

An old lady who is riding on an stairlift to climb upstairs in her home says: "This is as fast as it goes." I think, she thinks the stairlift is very slow and it should go faster, but this ...
yunus's user avatar
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Where is the main verb of "the glossy skyscrapers that house hedge funds and investment banks look too polished?"

Hollywood has long been seduced by the world of high finance. All that money! All that power! The glossy skyscrapers that house hedge funds and investment banks look too polished to contain American ...
Jones's user avatar
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Can adverbs act as subject complements?

Example: He is here. Or She is there. I have been taught that subject complements are adjectives, nouns, pronouns or phrases of them, but in the above example the adverb 'here' is describing the ...
Daniel Alemu's user avatar
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2 answers
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Which of the 2 sentences below is grammatically correct?

It was with great disappointment that Robin learnt that his cousin would not be coming. It was with great disappointment when Robin learnt that his cousin would not be coming.
Jacqueline Kuek's user avatar
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Do both these structures create the same meaning: ".... would not have been able to do ...." VS ".... couldn't have done...."

The following sentence is from a text about a new genetic testing method which reveals whether a tumor is cancerous or not, without having to apply chemotherapy. BBC - Genetic testing spared baby ...
yunus's user avatar
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Do these have the same meaning: "...finding out what his life has been like." VS "...finding out how his life has been."

"She spends time with him finding out what his life has been like." The question structure "What something is like" seems to have the same meaning with "how something is?"...
yunus's user avatar
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What is the sentence structure in PPT bullet points?

My teacher told me that, when writing slides for ppt presentation, I am not supposed to use a complete sentence structure like: "In this chapter the author also outlines the organization of the ...
dodo's user avatar
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Is this a weird structure or correct English? "Thank you to and Thank you you for watching me."

At the end of a video on English language exam by a native speaker, he says: "Thank you to and Thank you you for watching me. I will see you in the next video." IELTS video closing (see: 14:...
yunus's user avatar
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Do you know who VS Who do you know

Who do you know who would wear a hat like that? This sentence appears in my textbook. When I saw it, I started to wondering, effectively, if there is any difference in meaning between it and the ...
ForOU's user avatar
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complex sentence-structure

'Those look less, like a new, self-sacrificing focus on institutional security, than plain bad decision-making.' It is very difficult for me to understand. I get the part of 'Those look less than ...
Stephen's user avatar
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Any difference between: "Did you know anybody else that old?" AND "Did you know anybody else as old?"

Somebody asks a very old lady "How old are you"? And she says: "I am 101. Did you know anybody else that old?" Old lady (see:00:49-00:53) I sometimes hear that another structure ...
yunus's user avatar
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Contextual meaning of the text

"I'm very glad... That was a grand day we all had—and a fine game, too." "One o' the best days aht I ever 'ad in me life. Wish it was then and not nah—straight, I do. I'm off to Frawnce ...
Abid's user avatar
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Scare/beat The hell out of

A simple search on internet gives you the meaning of this idiom. But I am having a hard time understanding the structure of this idiom. When we say 'the movie scared the hell out of me', we generally ...
RADS's user avatar
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3 answers
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Word order of "code blue"

I have a random question about word-order that I have trouble looking up. Why is it correct to say: "the band Heart," "the movie 'Up!'," "code blue," "evasive ...
arctiq's user avatar
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How should I understand the following passage?

I'm so confused about the following passage. How should I take this part 'have availed and wrought for humanity in other creeds'? Is Divine Presences a subject of 'have availed and wrought'? Please, ...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
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Do the provided sentences exhibit a reduced adjective clause structure?

Perseus then flew to the realm of Atlas whose chief pride was his garden "filled with golden fruit". Those in favor of a milder approach to the drug problem point to the poor results "...
hamidkhal300's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
106 views

We can't use "here" for a city or country when it is in a picture from above. So, how do we ask someone to guess?

Imagine, you have got postcards of various places (countries, cities, towns etc) and you are now showing your friend those postcards, which have such pictures taken from above. So, when you are ...
yunus's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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walk unimpeded vs walk unimpededly

Recently I saw a sentence about protest from kuer The original sentence is as follows: This week, the protesters in Sao Paulo were allowed to walk unimpeded and there were no police on the streets. ...
baktbd's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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Function of a prepositional phrase

One of the things that fascinates us most about cats is the popular belief that they have nine lives. ( From New Concept English, book two) I want to know if "about cats" works in the ...
ForOU's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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Why are articles sometimes NOT used before common nouns?

Take a sentence like: 'Excellent lady that she was, Lady Gigabytes invited us over for dinner.' Or: 'Lady Gigabytes (excellent lady that she was) invited us over for dinner.' What both these sentences ...
Bushra Iqbal's user avatar
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What is the difference between "I think ........." VS "I just think .........."?

This is from an interview with a celebrity where she is asked many questions in a short period of time. At some point, in between two questions, the reporter says to her: "You were valedictorian ...
yunus's user avatar
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Is [a vocative][1] used as a subject in a sentence?

Is a vocative used as a subject in a sentence? If not, what is it used for? (By the way, what is the linguistic term that corresponds to the classification of the components in a sentence into subject,...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
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Would these be idiomatic to ask how responsible someone is: "How much of the blame is on him?" OR "How much of it is because of him?"

This is from the BBC Tomato shortage "Tomato shortage: How far is Brexit to blame?" At first I could not quite decide what exactly the question is focusing on. I thought people have not yet ...
yunus's user avatar
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secure at least 1 m from the floor?

I want to make a instruction for vertical ladder installation (Securing a ladder to a wall firmly with screws or something) Information I want to put in the sentence is: Secure one spot (less than 0....
Jiro F.'s user avatar
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How have we the impertinence to

How have we the impertinence to make these wild creatures forego their nature for ours, which at best they can but imitate? Does Virginia Woolf mean “How can we be so impertinent to make..”? Or “How ...
Angyang's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Are they the same in meaning: "This is September now" AND "It is September now"

This is from a native speaker gardener's youtube video where he tells about his roses Roses (see:5:50-5:53) "This is September now and a lot of my roses are still blooming." The structure &...
yunus's user avatar
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Are they all the same in meaning: "How far up something" OR "How far above something" OR "How far up above something"

How Far Up Above The Earth's Surface Do You Need To Go Before The Gravitational Acceleration Is 1/5 Of What You Feel On The Earth's? The group of words that make up the question "How far up above ...
yunus's user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
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"Oh, cough on me, why don't you?": Does this sentence mean the person is angry or is making a suggestion to do it more?

This is from an interview with a celebrity at her home when she is actually spending time with family. 73 questions with Kim (see:1:46-1:55) At one point, where she is with her children and talking to ...
yunus's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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What kind of grammar (structure) is used in this sentence? "only to be brought low themselves"

I saw the following sentence: Throughout literature we find recurring tales of forthright people who are outspoken in condemning illegal practices only to be brought low themselves when they, or ...
Hamed Homaee's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why is the sequence of the quoted line like that?

I was reading Maugham and came across this: I had not yet learnt how contradictory is human nature; I did not know how much pose there is in the sincere, how much baseness in the noble, nor how much ...
Angyang's user avatar
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"Areas to investigate could be x, y, z": do areas "be" or do they "include"?

Because of the plurality of areas, it sounds a bit odd to my ears to say "Areas to investigate in the future could be data quality issues or system compatibility". To me, the "be" ...
Luc's user avatar
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1 answer
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Connecting two sentences

What's this I hear about you getting married? https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/american_english/this_1 "What is this?" and "I hear about you getting married" ...
ForOU's user avatar
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Preposition "of" used after noun/pronoun in the middle of a sentence

Would the use of the preposition "of" in the middle of the following sentence (I imagine I'm using the passive voice for emphasis) be acceptable? That's the only way you know X (of) because ...
InfiniteUniverse's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
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How should I understand this sentence with the structure: 'not only, but...'?

In this following context, according to the structurue 'not only, but (also)', should the subject 'kamma' in preceding part, be the same subject as mentioned one, in following part too? I think ...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Which verb does this 'that-clause' serve as the object of?

This is from a news article : Huffman now takes issue with the third-party apps that are building a business on top of his own. “I didn’t know — and this is my fault — the extent that they were ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
73 views

Which I'm interested in vs. in which I'm interested

I recently stumbled across the following sentence: "Saving the planet is the topic in which I am interested the most." From my feel for language this sentence sounds good, but I would ...
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