Questions tagged [sentence-structure]

A complete sentence contains at least a subject and a verb, with all of the words being used in the sentence arranged in such a way that they express a complete thought.

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1answer
18 views

Clarifying “The man saw the woman with a telescope.”?

Cited from p. 12 of Introduction to Mathematical Thinking by Keith Devlin: The man saw the woman with a telescope. Who had the telescope, the man or the woman? My question Who, the man or the woman,...
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chain conditional sentences

If he’s not here by 2:30, I’ll call his parents. If you sent a message, I’ll reply. If Jane’s fever hasn’t gone down, Anna will take her to the hospital. If the client is here, I’ll be sure to ...
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Doubt in a particular newspaper extract with regard to the COVID-19 vaccine

Here to quote from the newspaper "The Hindu",it says that,"They assume that the vaccines which are gene based agents will 'remain entrapped in the circulation, and may be taken up by ...
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91 views

Who protects what?

Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act ("PIPEDA"): The Federal legislation that applies to protection of employee personal information by federally-regulated organizations (such ...
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19 views

is the sentence I have posted in the body a complete sentence?

May will be the first month post-board match messaging, updating on the state of NYC jobless rates and the conditions that are still being seen today.
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26 views

I wonder if there are some typos in this sentence: Ashely had pushed her past her patience pique

While reading a book I encountered the sentence I don't understand. Please give me some advice. Situation: During a class, a student, Ashley Bonny is caught being lackadaisical when she should pay ...
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challenges “facing” or “faced”?

Among the annoying challenges facing the middle class is one that will probably go unmentioned in the next presidential campaign: What happens when the robots come for their jobs? I can't understand ...
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4answers
61 views

Are sentences like, “He is a too-good person,” correct?

I wonder if sentences like the ones below are correct. John is a too-good person. (Trying to mean John is a person that is too good.) He's had too-young girlfriends. (Trying to mean someone has had ...
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31 views

What is meaning of this newspaper extract?

There have been exceptions — the Nepali Maoists, for example, managed to partake in power after peacefully ending the civil war — but if the Indian Maoists’ denunciation of these steps taken by their ...
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1answer
123 views

Is relative pronoun 'which' missing?

(1) This has caused a lot of damage to the environment. This damage leads to a loss of biodiversity. (2) This has caused a lot of damage to the environment, which leads to a loss of biodiversity. (3) ...
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86 views

Use of “May I be” for exclamation

In the language I speak when we see someone getting a lot and we don’t get that much, to speak to God in a sweet way, we say a sentence whose literal meaning in English is: May I be sacrificed for ...
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89 views

The placement of participles defining the subject of the main clause

As far as I know, we can use participles right before or after the subject of the main clause to give extra information about the subject. For example: 1- Dressed in his class-A uniform, the marine ...
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1answer
28 views

Analysing sentence structure

Please help me understand why the use of "human as" is wrong in the following sentence: [...] the philosophers emphasized the study of human as fundamental to their doctrine."
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6k views

When someone is trying to use your own words against you or just sophisticates the topic of discussion (In AmE)

In Puritanical philosophy there is a method for arguing which is called "sophistry". In this technique, the arguer uses a clever so called specific method in which they would use some key points of ...
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26 views

Is it correct to say “from first day of your job”?

I want to say: You can't make money from first day of your job Is that correct to say from first day of your job? Also does it make sense to say: You can't make money in the first year/ first two ...
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1answer
19 views

Does it make sense to say “they didn't make it overnight” in the below sentence?

There are many people who make a lot of money per month but they didn't make it overnight! Is that correct to say: they didn't make it overnight? or maybe i can say: They haven't reached there ...
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48 views

What's the meaning of “as” in this context?

This is why fighting is allowed in pro hockey (2:26) A player involved in a fight automatically gets what's known as a "major penalty" and must sit out at least 5 minutes of play. Additional ...
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Why are the 2 verbs in this sentence different tenses?

Why are the two verbs in this sentence in different tenses? Why is one in the past tense “interviewed” and “working” in present tense? -The actor interviewed by Frank is working on a project in Spain.
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How would I correct the sentence formation error and explain why it’s wrong? [closed]

How would I correct this sentence 2 different ways? And also explain the error? “While you using the NYC subway for the first time, it is important to know what “uptown” and “downtown” mean.” Would it ...
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How do I explain why “I wonder where is the bus station.” is wrong? [duplicate]

I am having a hard time explaining why the sentence “I wonder where is the bus station.” is wrong and it should be “I wonder where the bus station is.” How would I explain why the word “is” shouldn’t ...
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Is “looking for the treasure” an adverbial phrase?

Is "looking for the treasure" an adverbial phrase? Some pirates spent their whole lives looking for the treasure.
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426 views

interrogative and affirmative sentence constructions

Say we have the following sentence : The further information I need is to know in which building is the class held. Is it grammatically correct to place "is" where it's placed in the sentence, ...
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1answer
41 views

What does “never been one for me except” mean?

There is a sentence from Johnny Cash's Wikipedia page with a very strange structure: At the July 5, 2003, concert (his last public performance), before singing "Ring of Fire", Cash read a ...
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“Well I think it’s one of those times, the older or the experienced criticizing those with a little experience.”

Does it sound natural in a conversation? And what about in a written language? Well I think it’s one of those times, the older or the experienced criticizing those with a little experience. In this ...
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186 views

The use of it as object

SOURCE The following sentence is from the online Longmans dictionary. He found it increasingly difficult to read, for his eyes were failing. Is the part of sentence "it increasingly difficult to ...
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What type of sentence is it?

The government cap on payments for medical services is thought to have encouraged doctors to perform off-the-books, and potentially far more lucrative, services like illegal abortions. Is it a simple ...
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95 views

How to change “He told me that he has locked the door” to a simple sentence?

He told me that he has locked the door. How can this be rewritten as a simple sentence? A simple sentence is one that consists of just one independent clause. Can it be written as He told me to have ...
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2answers
48 views

It's + Adjective+ Infinitive

'It is important to take a break twice a day' 'It' is a dummy subject here, 'important' is working as an Adjective and but how this Infinitive clause'to take a break...' is working. Is it an Adverb as ...
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1answer
19 views

“These are the strongest painkillers THERE ARE.” or “These are strongest painkillers OUT THERE”

In a medical text I came across the following sentence: Morphine and morphine-like drugs are the strongest painkillers there are. I have never seen the usage of "there are" at the end of ...
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693 views

Which is correct? “To be done business” or “to do business with”

Could some help to clear my confusion as I am uncertain which sentence is grammatically correct: He is not the right person to be done business with. He is not right person to do business ...
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17 views

Are these clauses independent or dependent?

This fog is so thick, you can cut it with a knife. This fog is so thick that you can cut it with a knife. Also, if only one is a dependent clause, please explain why.
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34 views

What “it is of” means?

Section 40(1) of the Supreme Court Act sets out the main criteria the Court considers when deciding whether to grant a party leave to appeal. Under this section, the SCC may grant leave if it is of ...
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54 views

How to understand this sentence? (adding this to correct the typo)

This happened even before Justin Trudeau, Rachel Notley, and Kathleen Wynne arrived on the scene to carbon-tax-and-spend humanity into prosperity and cleanliness. This sentence is originally from an ...
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37 views

What's the structure of the first half of that sentence?

"Please provide a list of certifications received in the table below and attach each completed form." Q1. What's the structure of the first half of that sentence? 'Provide + a list of ...
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105 views

What is the phrase “suggesting ways to structure the competing considerations” modifying?

"In such cases, attending to the modes of moral reasoning that we characteristically accept can usefully expand the set of moral information from which we start, suggesting ways to structure the ...
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58 views

What's the grammatical structure of “all three of them periods”?

Oxford Guide to English Grammar; John Eastwood; Oxford University Press 1994-09 Page 54 2 Information in a text a In a text, old information usually comes first in the sentence and new ...
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1answer
49 views

Adverbs after the verb “BE” in “he has and STILL IS”?

In my grammar book, I saw this: He has been looking everywhere for you, and he still is. Why does 'is' stand after an adverb? I thought that there was a rule that we have to put adverbs ...
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18 views

“Analysis is run daily.” is it correct?

The following sentence is in an email from Google: “Analysis is run daily.” Please let me understand, why it isn’t “analysis runs daily” or “analysis does run daily” or “analysis is running daily”? Is ...
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1answer
132 views

General Infinitive vs Gerund usage

Is there a general rule telling me when I should use an Infinitive or a Gerund? For example, why is in this sentence a Gerund instead of an Infinitive? "The aim of this report is to give ...
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20 views

Who is it? What is the subject of this question

Who is it? Imagine there was a knock at the door and you say, "who is it?". What the subject is of this simple sentence? Could someone provide me with a detailed answer? Is "who" ...
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2answers
420 views

“are specified” or “have been specified” would be grammatically correct?

Which one is correct? The conditions of deformation and calculation of the soil – pipeline system are specified? Or: The conditions of deformation and calculation of the soil – pipeline system ...
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24 views

Where is the best place to place “faint/faintly” in this sentence?

A brief burst of machine-gun fire is faintly heard. A brief burst of machine-gun fire is heard faintly. A brief, faint burst of machine-gun fire is heard. A faint, brief burst of machine-gun fire is ...
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2answers
95 views

“How a foolish boy he is!” vs. “How foolish a boy he is!”

How a foolish boy he is! How foolish a boy he is! Which one is more correct? Actually I think it's the first one but I am not sure.
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32 views

Do these sentences have the same meaning: “I don't think he is a student.” and “I think he is not a student.”

1-"I don't think he is student." 2- "I think he is not a student." The speaker has the opinion that "he is not a student". But in order to say this in English, we make up ...
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1k views

“Government-issued” vs. “issued by the government”

I have a sentence improvement question : For a week last month, the team's 20 players were stranded because the government-issued passport is not up to international standards. I am confused ...
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3answers
510 views

What is the meaning of “only to have instead one nail snap off” in this sentence?

The claws scraped at a cloak they should have readily tattered, only to have instead one nail snap off. [Warcraft: War of the Ancients #1] The structure looks strange and I didn't ever see "instead"...
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What does “Ought not the suggestion of the worthy namesake of the psalmist to have its weight at such a moment?” mean in “The Last of the Mohicans”

I used to believe that I had a decent grasp of English as my second language, but now "The Last of the Mohicans" is completely crushing my self-esteem. This question is about one sentence, ...
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usage of demonstrative pronouns

I am writing an article. I have two sentences. The first sentence introduces a thesis. In the second sentence there is a reference to it. Should I use the relative pronoun "this" or "...
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Can “mislead” be accompanied by “that-clause”?

"The fallacy of false choice misleads that the choices which have been made explicit exhaust the sensible alternatives." Q1. The structure of the above sentence is "Subject + misleads ...
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3answers
224 views

“In order that” or “In order to”

I stumbled across this example sentence in Wikipedia: "I braked in order that the car stay on the road," and immediately thought what I would've said would be: "I braked so that the car would stay on ...

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