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Questions tagged [sentence-usage]

The usage of a particular sentence, how and where it is supposed to be used properly, so as to convey the intended message properly and obtain the most favorable outcome.

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1answer
2k views

Should “tomorrow evening” go at the beginning or end of the sentence?

Should "tomorrow evening" go at the beginning or end of the sentence? Are you free tomorrow evening? Tomorrow evening are you free? Which of these sentences is correct?
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1answer
116 views

Can I use 'where' as I do 'when' like the following?

I'm familar with this sentence. When I play basket ball, I'm happy. Then, How about 'where'? Can I use 'where' as I do 'when' like the following? Where I play basket ball, there are a lot of ...
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2answers
71 views

here, the other / the one / a person which one is right, sticking to 'more of'?

Here's a question I'd like to ask someone. Are you more of a person spending time alone or the other spending time with others. Are you more of a person spending time alone or the one ...
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2answers
536k views

“It was pleasure to meet you” vs “It was pleasure meeting you”

I met somebody for the first time two days ago and the next day he sent a message on Facebook in which he said, "Thank you" and I replied "You're welcome! It was pleasure to meet you." Although it is ...
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4answers
234 views

To a group of people: “I want all of your phone numbers.” Is this sentence correct?

If I'm talking to a group of people and I want the phone number of each person, how would I phrase that? Is "I want all of your phone numbers" correct?
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2answers
84 views

“Sudden/short shiver” in English

How do we say this in English when our body suddenly shakes for a moment due to change in temperature? Sometimes, when we go to a place at higher temperature than that of where we were before, we ...
3
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1answer
2k views

' being ' in participle clauses

According to the source " we can use an adverbial participle clause to express reason or cause as an alternative to a because/since/as clause. Using a participle clause in this way is more ...
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3answers
6k views

“wouldn't” vs. “won't” & “couldn't” vs “can't”

If we were talking about the importance of energy and that even machines need it what should we say? What's the difference between these two sentences: Machines wouldn't work without energy & ...
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2answers
11k views

Keeping on + keep in touch

Consider that parents whose son is leaving home for the college say to their son: Please keep on keep in touch with us when you get to the college. Is this sentence idiomatic? How do we say ...
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2answers
5k views

Are “Having common interests” and “having things in common” synonymous expressions?

Can we say A and B have many common interests (I am sure they are going to get on well.) to mean "A and B have (many) things in common"? Does it have double entendres or does it have only ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Not very sure about the keynote of this Microsoft Super Bowl Commercial

From 0:36 to the end of this Super Bowl Commercial "Microsoft Super Bowl Commercial 2015: Braylon O'Neill" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wLXRt-qRBfU#t=50) it says: "It's this process of ...
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1answer
170 views

How do I say “Congratulations, your photo was also seen on XYZ site!” in different ways? [closed]

Is it possible to say "Congratulations, your photo was also seen on XYZ site!" in different ways? Let say A's photo is listed on "Flickr's Explore" page or A's photo got selected in "Editor's Choice" ...
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2answers
733 views

Should it be “you've been in” or “you've been to”?

Which is the correct sentence? Why? It's the first time he has been in space. It's the first time he has been to space.
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2answers
4k views

Would “The reader is referred to …” sound commanding to a native ear?

I am wondering if "the reader is referred to ..." sounds rude to a native ear. If this sentence is kind of rude, then what else can I use as an alternative to it?
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4answers
8k views

Can we use “Been” without have/has/had?

I've never seen "been" been used without have/has/had. But in some songs it appears that they sometime use "been" without have. When I searched on internet the lyrics of some songs, it was actually ...
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1answer
1k views

Is it appropriate to use “in” always to denote inside a vehicle?

Normally when someone is inside a vehicle it is written as He is in the car I am in the bus But can I use the same word when it is related with a bike or bicycle are below sentences are correct ? I ...
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1answer
4k views

What do you say to a guest when they are departing your country and you are accompanying them e.g. to the airport?

What do the native say to a guest from abroad when: 1. he is in the country and they are departing your country and for instance you are accompanying them to the airport in the car OR 2. when ...
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2answers
3k views

Can I say “I sent her a message about”?

Can I say "I sent her a message about"? I'm asking it because I saw on Google there are only 7000 results. I have two questions about this issue: Should it not be very common sentence, or maybe ...
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1answer
1k views

“He makes” us vs “he wants to make us”

Can I say this either way? The habit he wants to make us change is recommended. The habit he makes us change is recommended.
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1answer
86 views

Is the following sentence still grammatical even though I omitted the verb?

”OK, I'll tell you the story,” he inhaled deeply, as if his tale would take all of his energy. “It started ...” So the full version would be something like: ”OK, I'll tell you the story,” he ...
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2answers
237 views

Clothing verbs when you do not mention any clothing

Please consider the following sentences: You’d better put your clothes on. Henry will be here in ten minutes. You’d better dress now. Henry will be here in ten minutes. You’d better get ...
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1answer
949 views

Is inpolite to say “check this out”?

Is there any problem to say check this out in a corporate environment in general situations? E.g: I am writing an email to a supplier to verify an issue, sending a ticket to IT support or even ...
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4answers
1k views

Does the sentence “ Sorry, I have no time.” give a bad impression?

When I want to stop chatting on computer, I said " Sorry, I have no time." Does this way of saying give a bad impression? Are there any better way of saying?
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1answer
1k views

Should I use “on”, “when” or “where” with “day”?

From Improbability Principle by David Hand: The really unusual day would be one where nothing unusual happens. An event happens on a day (e.g. On this day section of Wikipedia), so following this ...
4
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1answer
244 views

Proper words to utter when shaking hands with others?

I want to know what might be proper ways to express our regards to others when shaking hands with others in occasions such as church? I found that when shaking hands with others, often I do not get ...
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1answer
15k views

“How is going” or “How is it going” or both?

Which one is correct? "How is going" or "How is it going". I googled it but it seemed both are in use. Am I right with this point?
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1answer
745 views

“He has all of his goals achieved” or “He achieved all of his goals”?

Which one of the following two sentences is more authentic English? 1) He has all of his goals achieved. 2) He achieved all of his goals.
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1answer
1k views

“It holds that”

Usually we write the sentence "That Mary is a girl holds" as "It holds that Mary is a girl". My question is: What if we have more than one thing to say? I.e. how to write the sentence "That Mary is a ...
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1answer
92 views

“It was a time of heroes and villains, of battles and castles, intrigue and cunning.”

There is in the website http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/education/as/warsofindependence/index.shtml this sentence "It was a time of heroes and villains, of battles and castles, intrigue and cunning." ...
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1answer
178 views

Be he right or wrong?

Consider the following paragraph from the essay entitled "The usefulness of useless knowledge" by the founder of the Institute for Advanced Study, A. Flexner: The subject which I am discussing has ...
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2answers
6k views

Is it convenient or are you convenient? - How to use the word 'convenient'? [closed]

I looked upon some dictionaries for the adjective convenient and studied some examples. However, I did not get it. Whilst most of the example sentences use this adjective for a non-living thing, I ...
2
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1answer
64 views

How to appropriately arrange this description

I wish to describe a theorem of somebody X and also the statement of the theorem, and my first attempt is something like a theorem of X that gives a lower bound of ... . Then I immediately realized ...
3
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1answer
130 views

When to properly use Present Progressive statements?

Can present progressive statements be use at present or for the future? or both?
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2answers
227 views

Difference between I would and Would I in following sentences

I'm confused between the usage of placement of word would in these two sentences: What I would recommend to you is to buy XYZ book from the market. What would I recommend you to is to buy XYZ book ...
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1answer
67 views

Difference between past, past perfect, past perfect progressive tenses

I am wondering what is the difference, and in what case should I use these sentences: "I walked a lot to get there" "I have walked a lot to get there" "I have been walking a lot to get there"
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2answers
119 views

Why using quotation marks in this sentence and what does it means?

In the article from The Seattle Times, there is a sentence like this: But she also said it’s “incumbent” for the fashion labels to keep their sales channel “clean,” making sure in-season items don’...
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3answers
6k views

The polite ways of disagreement [closed]

I wonder if someone could tell me which one of the following choices work in AmE nowadays as a polite way of bringing up a disagreement: -A- I take the liberty to disagree. -B- I humbly disagree....
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2answers
2k views

Don't be overly friendly [duplicate]

Suppose you have a friend, named “Sam”. You know each other for example for 3-4 months. You see sometimes he plays some offensive practical jokes or makes some impolite advances to his friends and you ...
0
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1answer
6k views

“Don't be too forward” OR “Don't be this forward” [duplicate]

Suppose you met a guy in a party one month ago. You went out together for two-three times. Even you've exchanged some facts about your lives and know some details of your private lives. Now everyone ...
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1answer
2k views

I didn't mean to act rudely OR I didn't mean to take the liberty OR…?

Let's suppose you say a university professor or an elder person who you think a great deal of them, something not pleasant. Suddenly you see that they get upset. Then which one of the following ...
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2answers
4k views

More about taking the liberty of doing something [closed]

Please have a look on my three sets below: 1) a) I take the liberty to disagree. b) I venture to disagree. 2) a) I take the liberty to say that... b) I venture to say that... 3) a) I ...
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2answers
104k views

is it “What are you up today?” or “what are you up to today?”

I have always been asked this question but I want to be sure of the correct form. And does the correct form of this question mean "what are your plans for today?" Or "what will you do today?". Thank ...
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1answer
2k views

What does “keeping someone in shoe leather” mean?

In the following sentence: Unless your work is pro-bono, you should make sure that your customers keep you in shoe leather. What does "keeping someone in shoe leather" mean?
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2answers
10k views

what does “20,000 foot view” mean?

I have just started reading a book on Unix and came across a sentence which says: Fig. shows the 20,000 foot view of the organization of the GNU/Linux Operating System. What is meant by the 20,000 ...
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1answer
1k views

“How'd I come here?” vs “How did I come here?”

I found a related post here but I'm still confused and not sure whether it's correct to use "How'd I come here?". When search in google I got only about 11 results for "How'd I come here?", but I ...
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1answer
291 views

Get it? vs Got it?

1. What the heck are you doing? Stop that nonsense. Get it? 2. What the heck are you doing? Stop that nonsense. Got it? Which one of the above is correct? Is it okay to use just "Get it?" or "Got it?...
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2answers
160 views

John is making his daughter?

John is making his daughter ready for the school I guess you understand what I mean by the above sentence, though it's weird and may have grammatical errors. If you don't understand the above, here ...
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2answers
3k views

Usage of “Hey you!”

My understanding is that we can use "Hey you!" to call someone whom we don't know. Can I use "Hey, you!" to call someone when I'm very angry at him? Basically, my question is whether "Hey, you!" can ...
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1answer
11k views

Using another word instead of “in other words” in a sentence

Is there any other form to use instead of in other words in this sentence? this toy provides children to learn how to use their ability in other words, children can learn new things from the toy.
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1answer
599 views

'Convicted the Hung' - Right?

Can we say he was convicted the hung? Is it grammatically right or just an informal sentence? I've seen sentences like 'Sentenced to hang'. But i don't have any idea about this.