Questions tagged [slang]

Slang is a type of language that consists of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal.

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1answer
29 views

understanding house sister

what "esteemed house sister" means in the sentence? Alice. In my short time as your head of dorm. I and Mia, your esteemed house sister. The passage's from That Face (Play)
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1answer
21 views

A technique of using similar sounding words, instead of swear words

What is called a technique or method of using similar sounding words, instead of swear words in a sentence? For example: I'm not going to invite that mother trucker or mother father to the party.
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11 views

Understanding edges past the body

What is "He edges past the body" means in the last paragraph? The living room. Alice hangs in the open doorway to the bedroom. Billy sits at the table with his back to her. Screwed papers on ...
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1answer
33 views

Meaning of the verb “swing” in “How they swinging that?”

It was in the 12th episode of the 3rd season of Breaking Bad. Here is the context: Hank: How is your old man? Back teaching? Walt Jr: No. l don't think either of them are working right now. Hank: How ...
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2answers
47 views

What does “I am not the kind of dude who rolls” mean?

It's from the 12th episode of the 2nd season of Breaking Bad. Here is the context: Jesse's girlfiend: He's a high-school teacher. What's he gonna do, give you a B-minus? Send you outside to clap the ...
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1answer
18 views

Meaning of the verb “front” in context

It's from the sixth episode of the first season of Breaking Bad. The context is one guys took another guy to a drug distributor to sell him drugs. The guy hands him a pack of meth, but the drug dealer ...
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2answers
30 views

What does the slang adjective “sprung” mean?

I have come across it in the sixth episode of the first season of Breaking Bad. The context is two guys come to a drug disributor to sell him drugs. Here it is: Tuco, what's happening my brother. ...
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15 views

What does the phrase “be over someone's shit” mean?

Could you tell me what the phrase be over one's shit mean? For example: The math teacher was over my shit today.
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3answers
114 views

“nuts” and “on one's chin”

So I am enjoying this sketch That One Guy Who Still Says “These Nuts” (from the U.S, only available in some countries), What does "these nuts on your chin" mean when Vince says from 1:10~? ...
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2answers
54 views

What’s the difference between “scam” and “rip off”?

I was wondering what was the difference between these two terms: “To rip off” “To scam” Which one is better in this sentence? : “This store rips off their customers” “This store scams their customers” ...
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31 views

“seen before” vs “already seen”

Please clarify the exact difference between: I've seen your hands before and I've already seen your hands Which sounds more natural in everyday English and which sound more common in formal talking or ...
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1answer
23 views

Can “whatsoever” replace “at all”?

So I have difficulties to pronounce “at all” in English, and I was wondering if “whatsoever” meant the same thing, and if it could be used in a conversation. “He had no idea whatsoever.” “He had no ...
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52 views

When you got Latino(Mexican) cluttered words, what should I do? [closed]

Since the U.S comedy central started the new sketches such as this, I started watching happily. (Viewable to only limited countries) Now, from the first scene there are many slangs/Latino/Mexican(...
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Do we say “given” or “given that“?

Which is the formal one? “Given I’m tired, I won’t be there.” “Given that I am tired, I won’t be there.” Can we omit the “that” after “given” or it won’t be formal anymore? Other examples: I don’t ...
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30 views

Which of these sentence is correct given the subject of the sentence?

Which of these sentence is correct? “I am a person who likes their hair” (we conjugate with “person” we use “their” as a gender-neutral pronoun or do we put “his?”) “I am a person who like her hair” (...
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Is “cops” (= police) a slang/derogatory term?

So, I was with a friend getting Starbucks. While talking to him I used the term "cops" 💬. A customer waiting for their coffee said "We don't say 'cops' honey, it's disrespectful."...
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19 views

Understanding been up half the night lying in wait for her

I'm having trouble understanding of this passage from The Ferryman (Jez Butterworth) What is the meaning of:"been up half the night lying in wait for her"? UNCLE PAT. She’s been up half the ...
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32 views

What do you call a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness?

In colloquial English, what a person who cares about personal well-being, hygiene and fitness, is called? if there are words which refer to just one or two aspects please mention them too. (Looking ...
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19 views

Understanding separate parts of passage from The Ferryman

I'm having trouble understanding of the separate parts of passage from The Ferryman (Jez Butterworth) What are the meanings of these sentences according to the passages: "spread-eagled round the ...
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1answer
51 views

Understanding sentences from The Ferryman

I'm having trouble understanding of this passage from The Ferryman (Jez Butterworth) What are the meanings of these sentences according to the passage: "get a bead on", "I’m a ways past ...
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1answer
20 views

Is 'haven't a clue' slang? and do people all over the world use it or is it just a British thing, or is it used by a smaller group of people?

Just wondering as I always use it and people often ask me what I'm talking about. So it got me thinking that it might just be a British thing, or maybe even just a thing people from the country ...
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1answer
184 views

Is there a male equivalent of “Karen”?

Is there a male equivalent of "Karen"? I have heard a few (e.g., Frank, Bob, Ken), but they don't seem to have the wide currency that "Karen" does. Perhaps they do and I am not aware of it. ...
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2answers
32 views

Understanding “Herberts”

This passage is from The Ferryman (jez Butterworth) What "Herberts" means? MAGENNIS. When I was a kid we used to go out to my grandfather’s place down in Fermanagh there, and help with the harvest. ...
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44 views

What is the difference between “I got stuck” , “I was stuck”, “I'm stuck"?

What is the difference caused by using “I got stuck”, “I get stuck”, “I was stuck”, “I'm stuck"? Could anyone please advise which is more natural and when should one use over the other with sentences?...
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42 views

What's the meaning of the “moon” in this context

The situation is like this. A girl named Letitia was about to buy a house with atrium, but she found a naked divinity statue of Hecate, a goddess of the moon (it could be guessed because there was ...
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2answers
139 views

What is the difference between “yep” and “yeah”?

What is the difference caused by using “yep” instead of ”yeah”? Is it used because “yep” sounds better and not straight like “yeah”? In some situations, it feels like "yes" is better to use than no ...
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1answer
44 views

Other alternative for “does that make sense”?

What are other alternatives for "Does that make sense"? I personally think this phrase is natural, not rude nor respectful. Are any other alternatives for when you try to sound more serious/angry (...
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10 views

which verb is commen and which one is formal to use “move, displace, relocate, shift, etc.”

If one wants to leave a place permanently (house, working place, office) and go to another place, which verb can we use "(move, displace, relocate, shift, etc.) (to/ from)"? I mean "(move to/ from), (...
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4answers
219 views

The F-word: Is there a polite but equally emphatic and concise alternative to this specific meaning?

Is there a polite but equally emphatic and concise alternative to "Fuck 'em" or "Fuck it"? I am asking if there is an acceptable alternative to the F-word when it is used particularly to dismiss ...
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1answer
19 views

Understanding word in the college is 1987

The Passage is from Jez Butterworth's Jerusalem. what is this line: "Word in the college is 1987 is going to be worse." means? Also, who is Maureen Pringle? PROFESSOR: A DJ, eh? GINGER: That’s right,...
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52 views

Verb “D'd one up”

Now reading this article, I encountered a verb(probably slang) I quite don't understand. Gary Payton, the former NBA player says, “Oh you know I was hot! I was thinking about calling him at the ...
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37 views

What does it mean when someone say “I prefer to use the old Saxon word wo-wo-word”?

Earlier today I asked a question on Stack Exchange Economics asking about the benefits of a certain scheme. A user replied as follows Instead of the word "benefit" I prefer to use the old Saxon ...
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21 views

Understanding My beauty was never in danger

The passage's from The Ferryman (play). What is the meaning of "My beauty was never in danger" in the passage, Also is "Dunn's Ground" is a farming slang or something? MICHAEL. Here, Aunt Cait. ...
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2answers
62 views

Does 'nick' mean 'idiot' in British English?

I was watching 'On The Buses' (British comedy) and I came across the word 'nick' being used to mean something along the lines of 'idiot'. I've never heard nick being used to mean 'idiot'. One of the ...
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1answer
72 views

What do draft and swine mean?

the passage's from Frankenstein play. it's a part of the opening song. What do draft and swine mean? Come gather ye feast on our Empire's riches New heaven on Earth shall to all ages rise Those ...
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39 views

What does “if the children breed with the children” mean?

It's from a play based on Mary Shelley's novel. What does "if the children breed with the children" mean? Victor: I don’t know. I have travelled where no man has travelled. I wonder how far I can go....
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2answers
46 views

What does Meat for the dogs mean?

What does Meat for the dogs mean? it's from a play called Frankenstein Victor: I shall need a steady supply of internal organs. Ewan: Very good, sir. Rab: Organs! Ewan: Quiet, Rab. Meat for the dogs....
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1answer
243 views

Your item has shipped or has been shipped?

To my knowledge, as the verb ship is a synonym of send, the correct form should be Your item has been shipped. However on many online stores I see: Your item has shipped. Is this correct? To ...
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19 views

Is “have a lock on something” same as “having something on lock”?

And from what I understand they're informal; am I right?
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22 views

Emphasize something with two adverbs

Do you use two adverbs before noun to emphasize something or do you end sentence with three adverbs maybe informal in an informal setting if not formal way? If you do then what is adverb orders? Can ...
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1answer
33 views

How to ask people if his is currently going commando

When asking people if his is currently going commando (not wearing underwear), Should I say Did you came commando? or Are you on commando? or something else? I hope to get some help.
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1answer
106 views

What does “butt onions” mean in gambling?

Lines from Rounders (1998): Joey Knish : [to Mike, gently grabs his arm and tries to find an empty seat at another table] come here, you don't want to "butt onions" with these guys because they ...
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26 views

“I’m gonna have a nervous breakdown.” and “I have a nervous breakdown.” - what the difference?

I am reading the book "Diary of a Wimpy kid". The author often uses the word "be gonna". And it looks like this word does not carry a semantic load in many cases. Without it, sentences have the same ...
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4answers
83 views

Usage of the expression 'I'm having somebody', probably British slang

When Liam Gallagher says He's having Sid Vicious, what does that mean, does he dig him or not? Liam was answering question What does He think of Sid Vicious - that all the context I have. I've a ...
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3answers
81 views

A slang term for stealing forcibly

In Russian, there's this slang word which means "to steal something from someone by force" like a business or a cell-phone. "Отжать бизнес" or "Отжать мобилу". The verb is "wring out" - i. e. "to ...
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142 views

number to the number

In "Breaking bad" the recorded answering machine says: Yo, yo, yo, 1, 4, 8, 3 to the 3 to the 6 to the 9 representing the ABQ. What up, beyotch? Leave it at the tone. What does "to the" mean in ...
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1answer
42 views

“Bop the fizz” - what's the meaning?

What is the meaning of "bop the fizz" in this sentence? What kind of question is it? "hey who wants to go for lunch?" is a different question from "hey could you bop the fizz for Bigclient?" The ...
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38 views

Slang words which came into English from other languages?

Are there such modern slang words in British or American versions of the English language which came from other foreign languages?
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20 views

Understanding “Cracker”

What does "cracker" mean in these passages from The Ferryman by Jez Butterworth: 1: QUINN. Where’s Michael? CAITLIN. Flat on his cracker in bed. 2: MICHAEL. Morning, Tom Kettle. Where’s m’da? ...
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1answer
48 views

Understanding “pallias”

What does "pallias" mean in the passage: UNCLE PAT. Cow Gum! Now there’s a scent to stir the soul. September, nineteen hundred and eleven… I was seven years old. Pat, Maggie, Arthur, Frank and me, ...

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