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Questions tagged [spelling]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer concerning the written representation of the English language, especially spelling and word breaks (including hyphenation).

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8 votes
4 answers
2k views

Are both vocal cord and vocal chord correct?

Merriam-Webster's definition for chord says chord 3 of 3 noun (2) 1 : CORD sense 3a and its definition for cord says cord 1 of 2 noun 3 a : an anatomical structure (such as a nerve or tendon) ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,059
3 votes
2 answers
123 views

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

I checked dictionaries and tried googling but didn't get any useful answer. Are they just like "ice cream" and "ice-cream" where there is no difference in meaning at all? Or is ...
Betty's user avatar
  • 149
3 votes
1 answer
234 views

Should I spell proper nouns differently depending on the dialect I'm writing in?

I'm working on a text in British English. Should I use 'International Maritime Organization' or 'International Maritime Organisation'? Should proper nouns keep the original or can they be spelled ...
Ali E's user avatar
  • 865
0 votes
1 answer
112 views

How can I find words sound or spelled similar to a given word?

How can I find words that sound or are spelled similar to a given word? For example, given "enervate", I remember seeing words spelled or pronounced similarly, but I can't recall which ones. ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,059
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

When the consonant is doubled in a gerund? [duplicate]

Since 'traveling' can be spelled this way , why is the spelling of 'begining' wrong?They are both gerunds which come from a 2 sylable word ending with a consonant.
Root Groves's user avatar
-3 votes
2 answers
100 views

Why is the misspelling "writting" so common?

I find it peculiar that so many English learners seem to think that "writing" is written with two T:s. Is this an influence from some other language (which one?) or somehow otherwise ...
tripleee's user avatar
  • 385
1 vote
2 answers
121 views

How to write "1st-order"

Consider a sentence like: A first-order language. I am interested in the correct spelling of "first-order" in this context while writing "first" with a number. Which of the ...
Steeven's user avatar
  • 952
1 vote
3 answers
218 views

Why does Wagner begin with a "w" and not a "v"?

Private Military Company Wagner has made headlines ever since the escalation of the armed conflict in Ukraine. I have watched and listened to multiple news outlets report on its activities. Some read ...
jch55044's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
75 views

Humorous absurdity while spelling out

In my country (Italy) city names are generally used when spelling, for example: "R di Roma" which literally means "R as in Roma". Sometimes it is considered nonsense to use as an ...
TUPKAP's user avatar
  • 107
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

Is 'by the bye' an acceptable variant of 'by the by'?

This blog says, This phrase can be written in two ways: by the by and by the bye. Both spellings mean the same thing; by the by is the more common variant. Yet this blog says, Bye and bye, bye the ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 3,488
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

Why does the present continuous form of "mimic" become "mimicking"?

In most cases, the present continuous tense of a verb is appending "ing" to the end of the verb, like "playing" for "play", but why does "mimic" become "...
Wenfang Du's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
59 views

What are the differences between American English and British English in terms of formal set of replacement rules? [closed]

American Spelling British Spelling defen(s)e defen(c)e ([A-Za-z]+)ize ([A-Za-z]+)ise [A-Za-z]+ is a regular expression meaning "one or more letters" We do not have to use regular ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
39 views

Our Daughters name

My daughters name is Iyzrayella (eyes-ray-ella) now my husband and I are wondering if we are grammatically correct in the way we spelled her name.
Kyla Wallace's user avatar
-5 votes
2 answers
86 views

Shadowier or Shadowyer? [closed]

folks, I'm now trying to refute what dictionaries say, so I have to be either supported or disproven by you, wise owls. Okay, now I'm asking you to participate in my own presumption: dictionaries say ...
Леопольд-мэтр's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
85 views

How should the name "Kimia" be spelled? [closed]

My name is Kimia, but I have no idea which of the following spellings is right; Kimia or Kimya. I gotta say the last syllable of my name is pronounced like Mia. Would you tell me which one is correct?
Kim's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
2 answers
65 views

Is this usage of apostrophe grammatical: "the person with dementia’s employer"

This is from a booklet about caring for elderly people who has dementia: "requesting flexible working arrangements from your employer and the person with dementia’s employer." When I read it,...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,617
-2 votes
2 answers
454 views

Is there a difference between "has" and "is"?

In a English or American perspective of the difference because I sometimes have trouble making the difference is means a thing and has is owned but I sometimes have trouble making the difference For ...
harry games's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
406 views

What's the comparative and superlative of shy and dry?

What's the comparative and superlative of shy and dry? I've found you can either keep the y or change it for ier / iest. shyer - shyest or shier- shiest Dryer -dryest or drier - driest Also more shy ...
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
  • 1,015
-1 votes
1 answer
52 views

Is this sentence correct grammar? [closed]

Is the following sentence good grammar and proper spelling? We are planning to organize a family dinner this weekend and you may come as well. I'm unsure whether the highlighted elements are correct ...
sp Kruten's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
57 views

"Culture" or "Cultures" for Proper-Noun?

What is the correct spelling for the name of a place below? a) Asia Culture Museum b) Asia Cultures Museum
Peter Voon's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
39 views

How should I spell the name of the ruling: 30%-ruling or 30% ruling?

The Dutch expat tax regime is commonly referred to as: '30%-ruling'. Or should this be spelled '30% ruling' without the dash?
Frank Mélotte's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
62 views

Why do some people like use in' to symbolize ing?

In some movies or songs, "in'" is used instead of "ing". For example: "Searchin' high". The "Searchin'" is "Searching". Or "Lookin' for a place ...
Miranda's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
60 views

Correct British English Usage of Words [closed]

There are multiple words that are spelt differently in British English and American English. Which of these spellings is correct for British English? donut / doughnut aluminum / aluminium grey / gray ...
taylor.2317's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
76 views

Is there an English word subset which can demonstrate almost all familiar pronunciation?

For example, the pronunciation of "tube" is [tjuːb]. If I learned "tube", I know how to spell "student" which is [ˈstjuːdnt], because "tube" and "student&...
zhengchl's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
140 views

How is the rule of thumb to know whether to use "-or-" or "-our-"?

For years I kept struggling with differentiating between whether a particular word is using -or- or -our-. These are some examples of words that I'm often having problems with: Behaviour vs behavior ...
Chen Li Yong's user avatar
  • 1,171
2 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is there a difference between "artist" and "artiste"?

While we commonly use the word "artist" (for a person who knows any art), a lot of literary publications and even some news organisations spell the word as "artiste" - with an &...
Madhur's user avatar
  • 355
0 votes
1 answer
858 views

Old English versus Middle English [closed]

I am not English native and I just realized that some words are acceptable in different spellings. For example the word "amongst" often written as "among" or the word "towards&...
Liman's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
1 answer
120 views

There are many exceptions for the mnemonic rule of thumb "i before e except after c" but have any new attempts arrived at any new rule?

Per title, there are many exceptions for the mnemonic rule of thumb "i before e except after c". Have any new attempts arrived at any new rule? For example, compile all the cases of a ...
Kav's user avatar
  • 121
31 votes
2 answers
5k views

The Ö letter in "Coördinator"

I was watching some Pink Panther episodes on YouTube, and I noticed something weird. The word COORDINATOR is written COÖRDINATOR with an Ö. I searched for it in dictionaries and etymology references ...
Hamdiken's user avatar
  • 413
0 votes
2 answers
1k views

Daily practice vs daily practise

The sentence reads: ... thorough preparation and daily practice will be essential. In British/International English, would the word used here be "practice" or "practise"? I ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
98 views

Dangerously closely antonyms

We have a tag "pseudo-antonym" here ("flammable" vs. "inflammable", "get up" vs. "get down"), but I ask for the exact opposite. A classic is "He ...
Hauke Reddmann's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
4k views

"Pure" VS "Purer" VS "More pure" [closed]

Q.1) What's the difference between pure, purer, and more pure, and what's the correct situation to use each one? Q.2) What should I write (pure, purer, or more pure) in the following blank? Juice ...
Prem's user avatar
  • 5
2 votes
1 answer
456 views

Is it breastfeeding, breast-feeding or even breast feeding?

I’ve now seen three spellings for the same term: The Wikipedia article is called Breastfeeding. The Unicode standard calls the 🤱 emoji breast-feeding. Google adds “Did you mean: breastfeeding?” to ...
scy won't contribute anymore's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
88 views

Cancel(l)ed vs cancellation

cancel, vb., makes canceled and canceling in AmE. Yet, in cancellation the -l- is doubled (-ll-) because the accent falls on the third syllable. It's etymology is Can·ce(l)·la·tion Mid-16th c. Latin ...
GJC's user avatar
  • 829
-1 votes
2 answers
175 views

final letter "y", following a vowel, yet representing another syllable

Is there a word in English, in which the final letter "y", while following a vowel, would represent another syllable? For example, in the words "worry", "story", "...
brilliant's user avatar
  • 4,303
1 vote
1 answer
9k views

Pre-school or preschool?

When I check my various dictionaries (Longman; Cambridge; Merriam-Webster and a bilingual dictionary), preschool is spelt without a hyphen. Still, when I google it, I get a fair number of hits for ...
Helen's user avatar
  • 1,796
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

Cannonical or canonical? [closed]

I found spelling "cannonical" in this answer: https://dba.stackexchange.com/a/133641 My text editor marks it with red line as word error. Please tell me which form is correct, I have doubts.
Karol Zlot's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why do we have pronunciation for the word “liquorice” as ‘liquorish’?

Is there any difference in pronunciation between the American and British speakers?
Muhammad Arslan's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
3k views

Irreproducible, unreproducible, non-reproducible or not reproducible, which one to use?

I was going to add a tag for issues of my GitHub repository, to describe an issue that would not be able to be reproduced. Here are the four versions of this word I can think of: Irreproducible ...
Hao Wu's user avatar
  • 783
2 votes
1 answer
724 views

Which is (most) correct: "permille" or "per mille"?

The spelling "percent" (one word) is generally accepted, I think. Thus I presumed that "permille" (one word) would be correct, but the Cambridge Dictionary only mentions "per ...
nielsen's user avatar
  • 131
12 votes
3 answers
3k views

How do I decide if an "i" is pronounced long or short?

I am an English teacher who has never really learned the complex rules of teaching pronunciation. Many learners here in Spain have difficulties deciding whether an "i" in a word is long or ...
Patricia's user avatar
  • 129
3 votes
1 answer
122 views

When writing documentation for web-technologies that use American spelling, should the text also use American spelling?

As we know, English exists in many dialects. In another life, over 20 years ago, I spent a year and a half in Japan, teaching English. I was under no obligation to teach standard American English but ...
Rounin's user avatar
  • 752
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Demonopolise or de monopolise?

I'm preparing for academic IELTS by writing some essays and then correcting those using a grammar correction app. In the following sentence, If governments will find ways to effectively minimise ...
ZenBerry's user avatar
  • 387
1 vote
2 answers
112 views

Is ”Physical”'s IPA spelling not unique?

Could you come up with an explanation why the same adjective "physical" has two IPA renderings of the same pronunciation? Oxford Learners Dictionary: /ˈfɪzɪkl/ (that is the /ə/ is missed in ...
DanielC's user avatar
  • 125
13 votes
3 answers
4k views

Why are "LOse" and "LOOse" pronounced differently?

I know that both the words are pronounced and used differently. I also found another question on this site: "Use of loose and lose [closed]", but that is about the usage of the word. My ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
237 views

Pronunciation of adjectives ending with "-ate" [closed]

Legitimate How should I pronounce it? It's confusing me. There are so many vocabularies of adjectives ending with "ate" as in meet or as in "it" : like "tim -it" as in ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,656
4 votes
2 answers
6k views

Why does "wind" have two different pronunciations?

The word "wind" seems to be problematic (with almost all other English words that behave strangely). When it is used as a noun to mean the movement of air, it is pronounced to rhyme with &...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
64 views

Visualize and Visualise national recognition? [duplicate]

Which spelling is recognized more as the proper spelling globally?
user128005's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
3k views

Why is the <th> in "posthumous" pronounced as <ch> (/tʃ/)?

I have always pronounced the th in "posthumous" as if it was the "th" in think (/θ/), but when I searched itd it was actually the ch /tʃ/: UK: /ˈpɒs.tʃə.məs/ US: /ˈpɑːs.tʃə.məs/ ...
user avatar
32 votes
1 answer
7k views

Was "twelve" pronounced as "TPELF"?

I came across this piece of text and I for the life of me can't understand why "twelve" is written tpelf. I have encircled other numbers that are strange. My friend who lives in New York ...
user avatar

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