Questions tagged [spelling]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer concerning the written representation of the English language, especially spelling and word breaks (including hyphenation).

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0
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1answer
34 views

Pre-school or preschool?

When I check my various dictionaries (Longman; Cambridge; Merriam-Webster and a bilingual dictionary), preschool is spelt without a hyphen. Still, when I google it, I get a fair number of hits for ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Cannonical or canonical? [closed]

I found spelling "cannonical" in this answer: https://dba.stackexchange.com/a/133641 My text editor marks it with red line as word error. Please tell me which form is correct, I have doubts.
6
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1answer
803 views

Why do we have pronunciation for the word “liquorice” as ‘liquorish’?

Is there any difference in pronunciation between the American and British speakers?
8
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2answers
732 views

Irreproducible, unreproducible, non-reproducible or not reproducible, which one to use?

I was going to add a tag for issues of my GitHub repository, to describe an issue that would not be able to be reproduced. Here are the four versions of this word I can think of: Irreproducible ...
2
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1answer
239 views

Which is (most) correct: “permille” or “per mille”?

The spelling "percent" (one word) is generally accepted, I think. Thus I presumed that "permille" (one word) would be correct, but the Cambridge Dictionary only mentions "per ...
12
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3answers
1k views

How do I decide if an “i” is pronounced long or short?

I am an English teacher who has never really learned the complex rules of teaching pronunciation. Many learners here in Spain have difficulties deciding whether an "i" in a word is long or ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Does web-related English (or “Web English”) constitute a dialect of English? Should I write technical documentation using Web English?

As we know, English exists in many dialects. In another life, over 20 years ago, I spent a year and a half in Japan, teaching English. I was under no obligation to teach standard American English but ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Demonopolise or de monopolise?

I'm preparing for academic IELTS by writing some essays and then correcting those using a grammar correction app. In the following sentence, If governments will find ways to effectively minimise ...
1
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2answers
79 views

Is ”Physical”'s IPA spelling not unique?

Could you come up with an explanation why the same adjective "physical" has two IPA renderings of the same pronunciation? Oxford Learners Dictionary: /ˈfɪzɪkl/ (that is the /ə/ is missed in ...
14
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3answers
3k views

Why are “LOse” and “LOOse” pronounced differently?

I know that both the words are pronounced and used differently. I also found another question on this site: "Use of loose and lose [closed]", but that is about the usage of the word. My ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Pronunciation of adjectives ending with “-ate” [closed]

Legitimate How should I pronounce it? It's confusing me. There are so many vocabularies of adjectives ending with "ate" as in meet or as in "it" : like "tim -it" as in ...
4
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2answers
758 views

Why does “wind” have two different pronunciations?

The word "wind" seems to be problematic (with almost all other English words that behave strangely). When it is used as a noun to mean the movement of air, it is pronounced to rhyme with &...
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1answer
23 views

Visualize and Visualise national recognition? [duplicate]

Which spelling is recognized more as the proper spelling globally?
12
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2answers
2k views

Why is the <th> in “posthumous” pronounced as <ch> (/tʃ/)?

I have always pronounced the th in "posthumous" as if it was the "th" in think (/θ/), but when I searched itd it was actually the ch /tʃ/: UK: /ˈpɒs.tʃə.məs/ US: /ˈpɑːs.tʃə.məs/ ...
29
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1answer
6k views

Was “twelve” pronounced as “TPELF”?

I came across this piece of text and I for the life of me can't understand why "twelve" is written tpelf. I have encircled other numbers that are strange. My friend who lives in New York ...
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1answer
44 views

Any there other pairs similar to “advise/advice” and “devise/device”?

I was wondering if there are other similar pairs for "advise/advice" and "devise/device"? Updarte: I found this useful tip here (b) remember that 'ice' is a noun and therefore the ...
9
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3answers
2k views

“Backyard” vs “Front yard” - same but different

Not really a serious English question, more like a curiosity. I am wondering, why "backyard" is written as one word but "front yard" is written as two separate words. Equivalently, ...
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1answer
76 views

Why does “don't be” sometimes sound like “dombe”?

Why does "don't be" sometimes become "DOMBE"? There is no M in the spelling then why?
4
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3answers
473 views

Why the K is silent in “know” and “knowledge”? [duplicate]

Why is the K silent in "knowledge" and "know"? I have heard many non-natives pronounce the K but not natives. In dictionaries there is no K in the pronunciation but there is a K in ...
25
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2answers
3k views

Why is there a 'p' in “assumption” but not in “assume”?

I know a little bit about the suffix -tion. It is usually added to verbs. Examples: -domination (from dominate), -admiration (admire), -deviation (deviate), -ejection (eject). "Exemption (...
-2
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2answers
159 views

Reason or rule for pronunciations [closed]

I am not a native English speaker and I am learning English. Sometimes I will get baffled by the pronunciations used in English. It is very difficult to pronounce something just by looking at it. ...
0
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0answers
58 views

Why “admit” with T but “admissible” with SS?

I just noticed that when the suffix -ible is added to "admit", it becomes "admissible" rather than "admittible". There are few other examples: "omit" = "...
30
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1answer
8k views

Why is the W silent in “sword” but not in “swore”?

The word "sword" is pronounced /sɔːd/ (AmE: /sɔrd/) while "swore" is pronounced /swɔː/ (AmE: /swɔr/). The W in "sword" is silent because of the following round vowel; the ...
40
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3answers
15k views

Why is “iron” pronounced “EYE-URN” but not “EYE-RUN”?

I just noticed that the word iron is pronounced EYE-URN in standard Englishes instead of what the spelling suggests. I have always been pronouncing it "EYE-RUN" but I just checked its ...
0
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1answer
359 views

Is it “glowed” or “glown” when conjugating “glow”?

I want to say he's glown with brilliance but the spell checker barks at me for misspelling, like if it prefers glowed. This resource commands the latter, while this one the exact opposite. I've also ...
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1answer
4k views

Is 'resetted' a word?

Link 1 Link 2 I entered "resetted" and for the spell check, I searched and got the first link. I thought it is correct because (I thought all words are not included in a spell checker)1 and ...
-1
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1answer
105 views

Capitalization and hyphenation in words like 'southeastern' [closed]

Is it South-Eastern Ukraine, Southeastern Ukraine, or South Eastern Ukraine ? What about capitalization? I saw various spellings. Which one is the most advisable? Don't close the question.
3
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3answers
286 views

The silent “u”: “forty” and “fourteen”

We all know that the cardinal and ordinal numbers 4 and 4th are spelled ‘four’ and “fourth” respectively. Then we have 14 and 14th which are spelled “fourteen” and “fourteenth”. Yet the numbers 40 and ...
0
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1answer
86 views

Why “Acquire” instead of “Aquire”?

What does the "c" add to the word "aquire" when it already sounds correct meaning the verb "to gain; to possess"?
1
vote
1answer
62 views

General spelling rule: no double (repeated) consonant after another consonant?

Is it correct to tell ESL students that there aren't any words in English that have a double repeated consonant after another consonant? For example: Sttrugle Inffection dispposal Thanks!
0
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2answers
192 views

How many vowels in each syllable?

I'm trying to improve my spelling, and I came across this article, which states that "Every syllable has one vowel'. How can this be true while words like room, pain, eat, grow, etc. Have one ...
1
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0answers
36 views

What is the effective way to practice spelling for new words

I'm learning GRE vocab and they are quite a lot. Roughly in the range of 1000-3000 words. Reading, probably, is the most effective way to gain new words and reinforce them but I'm facing an issue with ...
4
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1answer
142 views

Expressing potayto-potahto, tomayto-tomahto correctly in writing

There's a saying expressing that the presented concepts are distinct without a difference. It's based on the pronunciation of potato and tomato. How would one go about writing that differnece in an ...
2
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1answer
33 views

Do I need to make the following changes when writing an abbreviation?

In math, there is a concept called random variable, and for convenience people usually just write r.v. I have some questions regarding writing the abbreviation r.v. in a sentence. Would a native ...
0
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1answer
72 views

Is the correct spelling “fulfil” or “fulfill”? [closed]

Which of the spelling is correct? “fulfil” or “fulfill”? I can find both spellings on the web, although “fulfil” is more common.
11
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6answers
5k views

Why is there one P in “hoping” and two P's in “hopping”?

Hoping is the present participle of hope. hopping is the present participle of hop. Hoping has only one p while hopping has two. What difference does it make? Why is hoping not hopping? Edit: I ...
16
votes
1answer
2k views

“the US.” or “the US”

When I said "in my field, people earn triple in the US. for the same work in China." a native speaker told me I should have got rid of that ".", is it a more modern style to refer to America?
0
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1answer
27 views

Is there any rule that governs whether we will use hyphen or concatenate two words like homemade?

I mean is there any rule to avoid spelling mistakes in these cases? Why we write homemade but we cannot write readymade, and we write ready-made instead? Also why shut down and hand over are verbs ...
0
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2answers
151 views

How To Spell Dates Written In Cardinal Numbers In American And British English

How do you spell the following date: December 6 (AmE) 6 December (BrE) Do you spell this date as 'December six' or 'December the sixth' in American English? And in British English, do you spell it ...
0
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1answer
45 views

how to change spelling to make a silent e sound

My name is June and I am Basque (North of Spain). My name is pronounced almost like in English except for that the final e is not silent. How do a write my name phonetics to show people how to ...
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1answer
88 views

How should I spell websites' names?

For example, News.Com published an article about demonstrations in Peru. Should I capitalize 'com' as I did?
0
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1answer
303 views

Plural of “computer bus”

I often see the word "bus" (in the sense of interconnect layer of a computer system) to be written in plural as either "buses" or "busses". Which one is the correct form? Wikipedia uses both on the ...
1
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3answers
85 views

e-commerce vs ecommerce

When using words like: ecommerce, ebanking, etc. What is the right way to write them? with dash like: e-commerce, e-banking? or as a one word: ecommerce, ebanking, etc.? I do not want to use the long ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

AmE vowel pronunciation dilemma

I can't figure out how to spell vowels in AmE. I generally prefer to pronounce "o" letter as "ɑ" as well as sometimes "ə". But it is done intuitively irrespective of any rule. I think there must be an ...
3
votes
1answer
144 views

A (imaginary) point or An (imaginary) point

A or An is usually decided by whether you pronounce the beginning of the following word as a consonant or not. Does a word in parentheses count as ' following'? A (imaginary) point or An (imaginary) ...
1
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1answer
82 views

Is “et al.” one or two words?

I use et al. to refer to a paper with more than two authors. However, the word et got separated by a line (due to line end) and the word al. cam in the beginning of a new line. ... Authorname [end ...
0
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1answer
607 views

Is 'families' the correct spelling?

We will find something to suit your families needs today! I do not know whether it should be "families", "families'" or "family's"
3
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1answer
601 views

correct spelling of “carruffel” (fuzz, hustle, all that jazz)

I faintly remember learning a word that means an arbitrary hubbub of things, all the to do, a minor inconvenience, etc., I'm not really sure. I thought it was ca. "carruffel", but that does not exist....
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Why is the letter “e” removed when changing some word's verb form to its noun form?

I came across a word which was encumber. Like this verb there are many words whose noun forms don't include e in that place (before r in that word). Is there any reason behind it or is it just an ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Gray or grey? I'm really not sure [duplicate]

Pretty self-explanatory (I know this is a common question). I'm not sure. Can someone help me out?

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