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Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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0answers
23 views

H.W question : long day vs hard day [on hold]

He did a lot of excercises in the club. What a ...... day! a. Long B. Hard C heavy D. Short
0
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2answers
25 views

Can I use a person's name instead of the pronoun “you”?

When talking to someone, can I use their name in place of "you"? Is this only used when talking a certain way (e.g. to children)? Or is this not done in English at all? Example: Ann is talking ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Clarification for the usage of “though”

I'm only asking for "though" as an adverb. There were already asked questions about this : Why people says 'tho' at the end of the sentence? Could you clarify when to use "Though" ...
2
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1answer
25 views

what does “throw your set” mean?

In Seinfeld, season 9, episode 1, at around 17 minute. KRAMER said to Seinfeld: Jerry, what are you doing? George tells me you're gonna throw your set? Seinfeld answered: That's right, ...
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2answers
23 views

“this qualifies for” vs. “this qualifies as”

What is the difference between "this qualifies for" and "this qualifies as"? I don't understand the difference between "qualifies for" and "qualifies as"
0
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1answer
17 views

type of usage with phrases [closed]

He finished the race and won a gold medal, a fitting conclusion to his career. He finished the race and won a gold medal, fitting conclusion to his career. When we use determiners with noun phrases ...
1
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1answer
20 views

What does “crank me up to nine” mean in this Seinfeld monologue?

"crank me up to nine" is around 18~19s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3aiFh4VR448 Full script: The cosmetic surgery procedures that are available to people today-- Liposuction, are you ...
1
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1answer
24 views

Pronounce 'a' sound (bat vs. but)

I am a middle aged adult with a non-English background and my English is proficient. I am unable to create the 'a' sound in words like bat or cat. My pronoucitation makes them sound like but and cut. ...
1
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2answers
49 views

Is “I think, may be that's more of a question to John.” grammatical?

I think, may be that's more of a question to John. While in conference call, I heard a person said the above sentence. Can anyone please correct the grammar in the above quoted sentence?
0
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1answer
11 views

Should I use “in” or “of”?

Which one is correct This is the last November of our college life. This is the last November in our college life.
0
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1answer
34 views

What is he saying in video? [closed]

What is he saying between 1:55 ~ 2:00 in the video in the link below? I can't hear well... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=koJMqQ5pV6E&feature=youtu.be&t=115
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0answers
49 views

How to speak english fluently [closed]

I am here to share one of my personal problem with you. I am not a native English speaker. I learn to read how to read or write in English. I am not very fluent in english. Sometime people ask me ...
0
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1answer
29 views

Which are the differences between the verbs “to say” and “to tell”? [closed]

i don't know in which contexts I have to use One of these two verbs? Can anyone help me?
0
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1answer
23 views

What does “You (don't) want to do something” mean while explaining?

What does it mean when someone explains something to me? You want to do this. You do not want to do this. Is this equal to You should/shouldn't do this? (instead of "do this" would be something ...
6
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6answers
4k views

What does “That was like three seconds” mean?

I was watching the movie "Eternal sunshine of the spotless mind" when I heard the phrase "That was like three seconds" from Kate Winslet. You can find this phrase at 01:14:25. She and Jim Carrey ...
0
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1answer
20 views

When to use “is” and “are” in the following examples?

Tea with biscuits is a very nice combination Tea with biscuits are a vey nice combination The problem is I am. Not understanding when to use are and when to use is Similar examples " tea with ...
0
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2answers
40 views

Do we say “A movie of Tarantino's” or “A movie of Tarantino”?

What do i say when i want to mean the same as i would mean by saying "The movie of his"? "Big bat of his", "Good looking face of hers" etc... Should i say "Big bat of the guy's" and "Good looking ...
1
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1answer
48 views

'''There are several days'' vs ''it is several days''

Context; İt is December 20 and I want to talk about the period of time until following christmas. Which one is the proper way to make that sentence or are both OK? Sentence a) İt is several days ...
3
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2answers
60 views

One/Two onion rings?

When making an order, is it correct to say the following? If so, Why? If not what is the correct way? Can I get one onion rings? In case you want two servings, Can I get two onion rings?
3
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2answers
54 views

How to use a question “What are you”? [duplicate]

I was looking through some English books and I found that in a dialogue one person ask another "What are you?" And answer was "I'm policeman." I first time saw this way to ask about ...
-1
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1answer
33 views

She and her sisters ____ our dog (adore) …what should come here?

Do we treat it as singular or plural? Will it be adore or adores?
4
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0answers
60 views

How to improve listening/speaking if learned mostly by reading/writing? [closed]

My first language is Spanish and I learned English mostly by reading/writing in academics and professional context but few listening and speaking practice. I got a job abroad and after 2 months I ...
1
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1answer
31 views

Is it natural to say academy/language school “happens”?

I heard one native American saying, "So right now, I'm actually attending language school which happens every single day for hours." But I'm not used to this kind of expression. Is it natural to ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Proper usage of the expression “words fail me"

I am trying to use the expression “words fail me” and I want to know if these sentences are formed correctly: Look at this mess, words fail me. This comment is so ridiculous that words fail ...
7
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6answers
989 views

How do natives say how they would like to pay?

How do natives answer the question "How would you like to pay?" When I want to pay with my bank card, sometimes they ask credit or debit? Sometimes they ask Visa or Mastercard? So I now usually say ...
0
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1answer
774 views

'She/He is not available' [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? Or is there a better way to frame this sentence? 'She/He is not available' Can the word 'available' be used to state the availability of a person? or is it ...
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2answers
100 views

“when I’m 100% confirm what to study” or “when I'm 100% confirmed what to study”

I’ll tell you when I’m 100% confirm what to study Or: I’ll tell you when I'm 100% confirmed what to study Which one is correct?
0
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1answer
34 views

Is it possible and normal to use the words without any verbs in everyday English? (look at the example)

Is it possible and normal to use the words without any verbs in this particular example?(The highlighted part I mean) Are we allowed to add an irrevelant sentence in the middle of it? ( the added ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Am I describing the time events using the right grammar?

Am I describing the time events using the right grammar? After finishing the 5 days of the IV steroids course, I started to regain most of my vision within one week (large blind spot). The rest ...
1
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2answers
147 views

Can't we say “don't/doesn't got” while we can say “I got”, “He got”, “They got” etc.? (American English)

I am used to hearing the positive version of "got" when it is used for meaning "have". For example, I mean we can say "I got a car.", "He got three children.", "I got no money." etc. But I am not ...
0
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1answer
22 views

The correct expression of 'follow his way (or method)'

I asked a question on a forum, and somebody (let's say his name is Bob) answered it (but not completely solve the problem). Based on this answer, I have the problem solved. I want to write the answer ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Is there any “official” level test focused on American accent?

The courses and level tests which I know are only focused on British English, like Cambridge or Oxford, especially for the listening tests. Just for curiosity, I would like to test my level of ...
3
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1answer
48 views

Is it true that “What are you drinking?" is used to offer to buy someone a drink?

I saw this from my dictionary: What are you drinking? used to offer to buy someone a drink, especially in a pub spoken. I am wondering if this usage is indeed applied in practice. What are ...
14
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6answers
4k views

Can “do somebody” mean “imitate somebody” in spoken English?

I heard this exchange from Friends (an American TV show): ... ... A: They do you. B: Do me? ... ... (Unfortunately, I don't know the episode number.) The context is that A is B's ...
38
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7answers
6k views

What's the meaning of “Can it, will you?”

I was watching a TV show, and one scene in a movie theatre goes like this: Film viewer: We know, sit down. Jason: Maggie. Maggie: How are theatre owners gonna know how we feel about this ...
1
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1answer
35 views

How do I answer the question “Who wants to read this?”?

When my teacher asks Who wants to read this? How do I reply? Me or I
0
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1answer
46 views

What's the meaning of this phrase? “…exploded in our faces.”

The conversation is below: Jason: Maggie. I tried to include you Maggie: Oh don't patronize me Jason throwing me a bone calling me old (expletive) maybe a few years you can bring me back ...
1
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1answer
66 views

What's the meaning of this sentence? “You must have quite a travel agent.”

Two questions here: First question,someone said "first I went to Europe, then I went to France."(we know there's something wrong with the logic of it.) and then someone replied "good, you must have ...
0
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1answer
48 views

what's the meaning of this sentence? why is the butler on all fours [duplicate]

I was watching Growing pains TV shows, one scene is that Carol is watching a show called "the sturgeons of Pitt Street", and her mom was watching too and asked Carol "why is the butler on all fours? " ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Introductory Sentence/introductory clause

Introductory clauses are dependent clauses that are often found at the beginning of the sentence (although they can be moved to the end of the sentence, too, without confusing the meaning of the ...
3
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2answers
123 views

In American English, can we flap the /d/ in the phrases “Where did”, “Where do”, “Where don't” and “Where does”?

I am 99% sure Americans quite often flap the /d/ sound which comes right after /r/ in the phrases "Where did", "Where do", "Where don't" and "Where does" (I am talking about the initial /d/'s), and I ...
0
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2answers
60 views

Can I just say “Watch” instead of “Watch where you are going”?

Can we just say "Watch." instead of "Watch where you are going."? Example Context: Let's say somebody hit me on the sidewalk. Note: I know that it can be rude to say these sentences. You don't need ...
0
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1answer
363 views

“This is a good day” vs “It is a good day” vs “Today is a good day” vs “It is a good day today”

Are these sentences below interchangeable? This is a good day. It is a good day. Today is a good day. It is a good day today. As far as I can remember all of them can be used. If we ...
0
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2answers
63 views

Use of 'shown' or 'showing'

Whish of these sentences is correct if I am talking about something that is currently showing: Some files are showing, which can be optimized. Some files are being shown which can be optimized....
3
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1answer
103 views

Can we say “How much guitar do you play a day?”?

In my experience, people can say sentences like: "How much guitar do you play a day?" instead of: "How much do you play guitar a day?" Do you think they are interchangeable? I think so.
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2answers
78 views

Can I say “Can I use your phone a little”?

As far as I know, the phrases "a little", "a little bit" and "a bit" can be used for meaning "for a short time". So, for meaning "Can I use your phone for a short time?", can I say these sentences? ...
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2answers
2k views

How old were you?

Let's say I knew how old somebody is at the moment, but I forgot it. In that case, I think I can ask, "How old were you?", am I right?
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2answers
37 views

Why does it omit “ed” when read it as in “flopped down”?

Her loose hair flopped down in front of her face and she casually flicked it aside sound source
6
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2answers
6k views

“I'm in” meaning?

I've seen these lines from the TV show Mom. A is a woman and B is a man A: So, should we do it? B: Yeah! Sure. A: Okay! Great! Tonight! Burgundy Bistro. 8:00 and I'll wear a red scarf. ...
1
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1answer
52 views

Can I say “I am sorry?” when I can't hear something?

As far as I know, we can say these when we can't hear something somebody said properly: "Excuse me?", "Sorry?" and "Pardon?". What about "I am sorry?"? Can I also say "I am sorry?" instead of "Sorry?"?...