Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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1answer
51 views

What does “Book skin” mean in this context? (I've got extra book skin from breastfeeding) [closed]

"I've got extra book skin from breastfeeding" What does "book skin" exactly mean here?
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2answers
63 views

How commonly used are “sir” and “madam” in spoken English in America?

Are "sir" and "madam" considered old-fashioned in spoken English in the US? Do native speakers use these words to address their teacher, boss, or customer in conversations?
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How it is possible to change the voice of a sentence which does not have object?

There is nothing to do. There is nothing to be done. There is time to study. There is nothing to be studied.
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3answers
1k views

Do native English speakers pronounce every final letter when speaking fast? [closed]

I came across situations where it looks like they don't pronounce the final letter of every word in a sentence? Personally, I feel that skipping the final letter somehow seems beautiful? What is the ...
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0answers
26 views

How many words are stressed?

When it comes to intonation, how many words are stressed in "But, I need your ideas."? I guess they include "but", "need", "your" and "ideas", but &...
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1answer
25 views

Difference between blow up and blow up over

I saw the meaning of blow up which is explode or anger. but could not find any reference related to blow up over. Sentence - This was an embarrassing moment for company that blew up over social media. ...
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1answer
16 views

Difference between come up and come on up

What is the difference between come up and come on up? I was able to check the meaning of come up here: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/come-up but could not search for come on up.
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28 views

Intonation changes meaning

The audio includes two short conversations in which the speaker answers with different intonations of "pretty" so as to cause different meanings of the two answers. The second one means she ...
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1answer
47 views

Is “there” often omitted in colloquial speech?

I am reading Post Office by Charles Bukowski. The writing style of the book is quite conversational and colloquial. This sentence came up in the book. I think he wanted to use the word “hygienics” ...
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53 views

Can “ was” and “were” be used interchangeably?

I am reading Post Office by Charles Bukowski. The writing style of the book is quite conversational and colloquial. This is a paragraph from the book. As I stood there, the 10,000 flies began to come ...
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0answers
39 views

What's the intonation pattern of “ideas”?

The utterance of the audio is "But I need your ideas. I need two heads." The intonation pattern of "heads" completely goes down because the speaker's statement is finished. However,...
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1answer
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Meaning of “I just look out and go” in “Doctors will be, walk a couple of miles every day. And I just look out and go, can't be bothered.”

From a speech by a depressed man who was told to exercise more: And the doctors will be, just go out and do a couple of mile walk every day. And I just look out and go, can’t be bothered. Can’t be ...
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1answer
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What's the difference in meaning and formality between these questions?

A. "You're feeling a little nervous, aren't you?" B. "Feeling a little nervous, are you?" C. "A little nervous, are you?" My questions are: Are B and C correct? Is there ...
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1answer
30 views

Meaning of “The other right” and “back looping”

I was watching the sci-fi series "The Flash". Character1 is instructing Character2 about direction: Character1: "Turn right" Charater2 moves in the wrong direction. Charater1: &...
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18 views

Alternate ways to say if you want/if you want to/if you'd like

Alternate ways to say if you want/if you want to/if you'd like I'd really appreciate if any could help me out here.
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2answers
64 views

Is there a term for when you make a mistake and exchange sounds in a word?

It happens a lot in speech and in fact happened to me an hour ago. I was talking to a friend and I had to say the word "relevant" but instead I said "revelant". "It is not ...
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0answers
16 views

Am I obliged to backshift here in this situation

Is it possible not to backshift if the situation is still the same? He told me he has not received it if at the time of reporting he has still not received it or is it better to backshift? I think ...
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0answers
27 views

What is the intonation pattern of the sentence?

What is the intonation pattern of the sentence at 0:13 around in the clip? Does it go like this? Moreover, does the intonation of the speakers in the clip sound like a normal daily conversation that ...
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1answer
64 views

Is the possessive 's pronounced s or z?

Is 's as a possessive pronounced as /s/ or /z/ at the end of words? Such as in "Muhammad's house".
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1answer
30 views

Can I use the answer “It better.” in this example?

Can I use the answer "It better." in this example? 'I'm sure your dedication to the job will pay off soon,' said John. 'It better,' replied his friend. Is this dialogue correct? I'm not ...
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1answer
1k views

What does it mean by ask a question?

Should the "ask" be in an "ing" form? Consider the following conversation, A: I think I can ask a question on Stack Exchange. B: What do you mean by ask a question? Should I ...
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3answers
99 views

Dropping the /t/ sound in words like, “wanted” [duplicate]

In my experience, a lot of Americans, on many occasions, don't make the standard /t/ sound in words like "wanted," "twenty," "accidentally," "presented," "...
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3answers
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I'm not really seeing/I don't really see/I can't really see?

Which one of these is correct/natural? 1) Listen, I'm standing outside the stadium right now and I'm not really seeing any players or fans or anything. Are you sure the match was today? 2) Listen, I'm ...
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1answer
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“She does?”, “she has?” etc as rhetorical questions

I have many native English friends I talk with and I have noticed one thing among them: they use question tags (not quite question tag but more of a rhetorical question) in a different way. For ...
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1answer
38 views

Is there a phonetic change in the pronunciation of 'anybody' in this audio?

Here is audio. The audio is from video at 2:10. I have subtitles: Anybody want to log on to second life and go swimming? I just build a virtual pool. I'm an English learner. For me, it's hard to ...
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“there's a normally and we're using `two's` complement arithmetic inside our machine”

I was watching an educational lecture about programming where the instructor has said: So, that means that they can get larger. Meaning, there's a normally and we're using two's complement arithmetic ...
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2answers
4k views

What does “Did you save room for dessert?” mean?

What does "Did you save room for dessert?" mean? I'm an English learner. I don't know what this sentence means, especially the "save room" part. Please describe its meaning for me.
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Do the British use words like “batso” or “nutso”?

Today I encountered the word "batso" and I understood from context it meant "crazy". It interested me because it sounds like an Italian word "pazzo" which means "...
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3answers
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Rephrasing using verb (prohibit)

can I rephrase " Our religion prohibit us from drinking alcohol " to be " Our religion prohibit drinking alcohol on us", precisely I want to know if "on us" is ...
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9answers
7k views

Are you an English? Are you a British?

I once encountered a lady who seemed to come from America or the United Kingdom. When I asked Are you an American? she said no. I was reluctant to ask if she is an English because it sounded very ...
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Indirect speech for past tense

What would be the indirect speech for the sentence given below. The teacher said,"she was sick yesterday". Which one is correct. The teacher said that she was sick the previous day. The ...
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1answer
158 views

How to make syllable structure and sonority graph of “twelfths” and “grudged”?

I have an exam this week and I don't even know how to make syllable structure and sonority graph of the following words: grudged and twelfths. I was infected by COVID-19 and have not attended my ...
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2answers
16 views

“can add up” or “can't add up”?

This is what I hear from a voice in TOEFL exam: " ... If they start cutting back the meals and we can't get what we want here on campus, well, we are going to go off campus and pay off-campus ...
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2answers
55 views

Difficult for him VS Difficult on him

I was talking about military service with my friend and I wanted to say : My cousin just finished his military service and it was hard for him. Then, my friend interrupted me and told me that I should ...
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2answers
781 views

He and I / Him and me / He and me / Him and I [duplicate]

A: Where would you have the perfect date? B: In a place without people. Just him and me. Is this written correctly?
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1answer
65 views

What's the difference in pronunciation between case-sensitive and k-sensitive?

This question is probably simple, but the rule behind it may apply generally. My assumption is: If the end of a word duplicate the beginning of the next word, the beginning of the next word should be ...
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1answer
6 views

use “of” alongside “aim”

I am not sure which sentence is correct: with the aim of raising awareness Or With the aim to raise awareness
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1answer
50 views

Why we can't say “'this black guy” in Europe

To day, I read on News by Vietnamese. I known that Paris Saint-Germain's vs Istanbul Basaksehir Game suspended after alleged racist abuse by official. So, he just Said: "this black guy"? In ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “ciao” equivalent to “hello” and “goodbye” in English?

I'm from Vietnam, and I'm learning English. I remembered someone said "Ciao" to me once. I wondered if they could speak Vietnamese since "Ciao" is the same as "Chào" in ...
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0answers
19 views

Classma or classmate in spoken English

An American tutor said you should say classma(omit t) rather than classmate in spoken English. An Irish teacher told me you should never omit t in spoken English, such as but, as it is considered to ...
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2answers
39 views

What does the following sentence mean ? “Since when is …”

I saw the following sentence and I cannot understand its exact meaning. Since when is W equal to PV ? I do not understand the combination of "since + when". Is it also formal or informal? ...
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1answer
47 views

“Who was… with?”, “Who was with…?”, “With whom…?”, and “Whom… with?”

Leaving to one side whether “who” is the subject or the object of the sentence, to the best of my knowledge all four questions below are considered grammatical and acceptable ways of asking who the ...
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1answer
21 views

How to say to a cashier that I want this stuff to get delivered to my home?

A supermarket near my home offers the delivery service. How should I tell the cashier that I want these items to get delivered to my home? I usually say "It’s for delivery" but it doesn't ...
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1answer
71 views

What is your name = Your name is Mr What?

In Mind Your Language Video I see. Office: What is your name? Ali: What is not my name? What is not here? Office: Who is not here? Ali: Mr What.... So: What is your name? = Your name is Mr What? Who ...
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5answers
3k views

What is the grandchild of a parents's siblings called? [duplicate]

I know that my parents' siblings' child is my cousin. But what about the grandchild of my parents' siblings?
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1answer
73 views

Spoken English for direction of a Road

I try to solve a map by reading a transcript of the map. Map Here I share just one part of the transcript for The Reynolds House The sheepmarket is one of the main centers for art and history in the ...
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0answers
25 views

Suggestions to follow while tutoring online a French student who wants to improve his speaking listening skills in English? [closed]

I'll be tutoring online a french student who I think has at least an advanced intermediate level in all parts of English, and wants to improve his speaking and listening skills, specially following ...
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4answers
248 views

Can I always drop the T and the D at the end of verbs in the past (or past participle) tense when they come between two consonants sounds?

I am Brazilian and I'm trying to improve my English-speaking skills. I having a tough time linking verbs in the past tense to words starting with consonants other than T and D. I learned that many ...
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1answer
170 views

“Someone is sitting next to me.” “Someone sits next to me.”

What is the difference between following sentences and more appropriate in a conversation. Someone is sitting next to me. Someone sits next to me.
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1answer
73 views

What does it mean to use the words “not” and “without” in the same sentence?

For example: I won't study without you. I can't finish this project without you. Don't eat without me. There is no way to do this without taking risks. I didn't play this game without him. When ...

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