Skip to main content

Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
0 answers
49 views

How would you translate "le rendez-vous du tout Paris" in English?

This is a "famous" French expression and to be honest, I thought Anglophone speakers used it too, I was almost sure I'd heard it before. Some research online and no results. Do you know if ...
Mathilde Da Silva's user avatar
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Can I completely omit "of" when speaking quickly?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_der_x5Zxmc At 3:37 of this video the man says, as far as I'm concerned, "For portions of that first half we sort of dominated them". I've slowed the audio ...
musialmi's user avatar
  • 533
-1 votes
1 answer
45 views

I can't understand the last line. What does the speaker want to say?

Graphic designers use a variety of design element to achieve artistic or decorative effects in print or electronic mediums to help determine the message, and the design should convey. Shouldn't it be: ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
76 views

How to say numbers correctly

1/ How can we say such numbers as 3.500, 27.500, etc.? Is it possible to say "three hundred and a half", "twenty seven and a half"? 2/ Is it ok to say 4.5 as "four point five&...
Zina B's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
74 views

Is Doug pronounced dug or door-g?

I remember many years ago when I was in Durham, UK, people pronounce the name Doug as door-g. However, I look up the dictionary and Oxford dict online and many other sources, they clearly say that ...
Chenxi's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Using the short form of the verb 'to be' in continuous aspect

I'm wondering if it is okay to use a short form of "to be" after nouns, as in the sentences: "The women 're working", "The birds're singing".
Iza Lev's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
3 answers
54 views

When speaking “I feel like ...” , where to pause?

Surrounded by the majestic mountains, breathtaking coastlines, and enjoying a warm, mild climate, I often feel like I’m residing in paradise on earth. When reading the last part of the sentence, ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,841
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

What's this linguistic, phonetic or phonologic phenomenon called?

I was enjoying the relaxing vibes that the hotel provided. When Americans say the above sentence, do they sometimes say "vibes that" as "vibesat"? Does it also happen in other ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 3,841
1 vote
3 answers
105 views

can i start a sentence after a preposition? [closed]

I just want to make sure that I can start a sentence after a preposition. because I have seen some sentences that were started with prepositions like this In the closet is where I keep the dog food. ...
Sammed's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
56 views

How prevalent is the usage of the word prudent among native english speakers [closed]

I'm not certain if this is the appropriate place to inquire, but I have a question about the English language: I recently learned the word "prudent" and its meaning. However, I'm curious ...
nicku's user avatar
  • 775
2 votes
2 answers
76 views

Using words "not" and "until" in the same sentence

For example, let's say someone said to me, "You did not need to wait until I was in the pool to hold me". I believe this can translate to something like, "You did not need to wait to ...
Max's user avatar
  • 71
33 votes
8 answers
6k views

Does “you can go now” sound rude? Context provided in question

As an IT guy in a college, I was helping a professor with his phone problems. After I was done helping him, I told him “you can go now.” to end the interaction as I had another student waiting for my ...
mathdummies's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
174 views

If we can “give someone a call”, why can't we “give a phone call”?

According to Cambridge Dictionary a phone call (also phonecall) is something that you make, and provides the following examples Will you excuse me? I need to make a phone call. I've got a few phone ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.8k
3 votes
2 answers
151 views

Is it my ears or is it the narrator pronouncing"...JAGGED CLIFFS" something like ".... JAG IL TIFFS."?

Cornered, the seals keep close to the jagged cliffs. BBC (see:1:19-1:23) I listened to it more than 10 times and suprised to hear the "...jagged cliffs" was pronounced something like ".....
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
1 vote
1 answer
203 views

What is the meaning of "Not actually"?

For example, let's say Person A says "1 plus 1 is 3". Then Person B can either say "It's not 3, it's 2" or "It's actually 2". What if Person B says "It's not ...
Max's user avatar
  • 71
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

Using The "Across" preposition in "The Pharmacy is across the Market" sentence is appropriate?

I wanted to ask if "across" can be used in daily life like that, or using "opposite" is a more proper one instead of "across"
Alim Gölcük's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Who you don't know their name" vs "Whose name you don't know"

From urbandictionary.com: (1) G - word used to call someone who you don't know their name my variant: (2) G - word used to call someone whose name you don't know As far as I understand, entry (1) is ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,921
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Sometimes 'to be' verb is not pronounced or pronounced well in a sentence in spoken English (new post with source) is this correct?

It seems that sometimes in spoken English, The verb to be is not pronounced (or not pronounced well). According to the examples given, is this correct? After comparing almost correct subtitles with ...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Can you turn a declarative sentence into a interrogative sentence with changing pronunciation type or way of tone? [duplicate]

Looks like you can change a declarative sentence to interrogative by changing your way of speech. I have come across this several times, What do you think? Hey man, How's it going? -Hey fine, And you?...
Kaveh Behnia 's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
51 views

I want to know about English grammar's passive and active voices?

Organization was formed to achieve specific goals. Is it passive voice or active voice? If it's passive voice then what is it expressed in an active voice?
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
407 views

Using ing verbs

How many times can you use ing without it becoming wrong? The waiting room was empty except for an old man sitting in a corner reading a book. Is two times the limit? The waiting room was empty ...
Chirag Solanki's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
124 views

Can I say "I'm doing this first than you"?

I don't think you can be first than someone, but I was thinking like some sort of competition. Would this be considered: The one that done it before you do?
Traduções Angelicais's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
60 views

Do you pronounce discount or disgount?

I learned in English class that you should change pronunciation, k to g, t to d and p to b, that is immediately after s in spoken English, like express -> exbress and skill -> sgill. I am using ...
Chenxi's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote
1 answer
30 views

less than four miles of water

The following is a CNN trascript. Is something missing in the boldfaced part? I'm here in Taiwan. On a small island sitting surprisingly close to that bustling metropolis behind me, less than four ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 6,006
-3 votes
1 answer
52 views

Idiomatic translation of "把英语捡起来" in spoken English?

A friend informed me that they haven't been practicing English for a while and would like to "pick up" their English learning journey again. In Chinese, they say "我最近好久没学英语了,得把英语捡起来&...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,539
2 votes
3 answers
203 views

What is the right pronunciation of "planned"?

Today in my English class my teacher taught us about the "plan" verb using it in present perfect. I was curious what is the right pronunciation of "planned" in American or British ...
learnerg5's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
830 views

When should I make a pause: before or after "that"?

Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that it would be harder to study chemistry or physics without a teacher's guidance than painting. I've always thought that I should say like "it seems to me ...
dmjy's user avatar
  • 275
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

What does "the point being" mean in this sentence?

I watched a Selena Gomez speech (https://youtu.be/jG-4kBIDAzA?t=120). At 2:00, she said this below. When I was eleven, the point being is that when I was seven, I wanted to be an actress and I wanted ...
dmjy's user avatar
  • 275
2 votes
1 answer
434 views

What does the word "feedback" actually mean?

I googled the meaning and it tells me "'feedback' means 'information about reactions to a product, a person's performance of a task, etc. which is used as a basis for improvement'." However, ...
jack S's user avatar
  • 39
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

What does "apparently" mean in this conversation? [closed]

"Now we've got to give a bit of feedback about last term's modules - just short comments, apparently. Shall we do that now?" "OK. So medical terminology." I know "apparently&...
jack S's user avatar
  • 39
2 votes
1 answer
232 views

"Pick me up and bring me" vs "carry me" vs other form

Let's say my child wants me to pick him up and carry him to his room, what should he say? What a native English speaker would say in this situation? "Daddy pick me up and bring me to my room&...
Marco Demaio's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Will the word "tell" work in the given context?

Is it possible to use the word "tell" in the provided context? If not, please, give your reason(s). She took part in school debates as the leader of the high school debate team, and ...
Appolinaria's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Is “what color is she” colloquial?

I have a pony. What color is she? That’s sounds always wrong for me. Is it colloquial? I would always say: What color does she have? What is more common?
Petra's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
1 answer
169 views

What is the full expression of "welcome to X"?

We can say "Welcome to" + a place, like "Welcome to my website" or "Welcome to Berlin", to greet someone, but I don't know what the complete expression of "welcome ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,539
-1 votes
2 answers
61 views

What does "used to" mean in the definition part in a dictionary?

I modified the original question to make it clearer so that it could help more people. If you want to see the original question, please see the edit history or scroll down. -- I'm using the Longman ...
Alex Teng's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
192 views

Do uncommon and rare both have same meaning? [duplicate]

"Do 'uncommon' and 'rare' both have the same meaning, and can one replace the other in a sentence?" Can you explain what is the correct usage. Uncommon (of an event, situation, or condition)...
Nadeem Taj's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
50 views

How to say "Please save his portion for him to eat later" more natively and shortly?

Say one friend is absent at the time when we are eating out with friends. And maybe also the food is so great that we just couldn't stop eating more than we need. So, if I want to remind/tell my ...
user152435's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

Is memory in the sentence focus to remember or to remind?

She says, laughing at the memory. “The lab assistant just said, ‘Well, nobody’s ever done that before.’” Thank you and will welcome an expert voice.
Nadeem Taj's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

The actress says something like "Even heeeevy" but the subtitle says "Even though ........" Is she really pronuncing ".....though" or is it my ears?

This is from the famous TV series "Friends", in which Rachel goes to a job interview a second time. ( see 1:24-2:00 ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PgyARtIWSw At 1:49, she suddenly shouts ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,411
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

What would be the meaning of "You give me the awful impression […] of someone who hasn't read any of the arguments against your position ever."?

As a non native speaker I am facing trouble understanding one of the famous quotes from Christopher Hitchens, "You give me the awful impression, I hate to have to say it, of someone who hasn't ...
Sazzad Hissain Khan's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

Why does the rising pitch start from "in a rush" instead of "rush"?

YouTube: in a rush Please watch the video first. The image is the pitch contour from PRAAT. It shows that the rising pitch starts from "in a rush" instead of "rush". Is it because ...
questionguy's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Can "correct" be used in the sense of "decent" in "My day was correct/decent"?

After a discussion with a French native speaker, I am asking here: Can the sentence "My day was correct" be used synonymously with "My day was decent" when answering to "How ...
Anon's user avatar
  • 53
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

which one is more appropriate? indicate: ... or indicate

I'm writing to describe a cartoon, and there's a caption that means "on the road" below the cartoon. should I write 1: The caption indicates: "On the road". or 2: The caption ...
Cc11111's user avatar
  • 29
14 votes
8 answers
4k views

Students doubt the usefulness of the Present Perfect tenses

I've got the same questions from different students recently. They question the necessity of learning Perfect tenses (even the Present Perfect Simple) claiming that as rumors say or as they hear in ...
NadinSh's user avatar
  • 189
1 vote
0 answers
32 views

What does this woman want to say? [closed]

Would you kindly help me to understand what does the woman said here in these few seconds " 25:3 to 25:14" I really couldn't understand it https://fb.watch/fh9a2egKL2/
Aneera's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
709 views

Usage of "long time no see/hear" in informal speech

What is the most common thing to say when we send a text to someone who hasn't texted us for a few days? "long time no see" or "long time no hear" or can both be used? Does it ...
User491210's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
78 views

Why do we use "is" instead of "has been" in this example? [closed]

Why do we use "is" instead of "has been" in the below example? Lisa is in Germany. She (is/has been) there on a business trip.
Sunflower's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Is replying to an uncertainty correct English?

Person 1: "I don't know whether to get A or B" Person 2: "B" For example: Person 1: "I don't know whether to get an apple or a windows computer" Person 2: "windows ...
user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
176 views

Can I start a sentence with a noun phrase acting like a direct object?

Can I start a sentence with a long noun phrase acting like a direct object? The ice cream that I bought yesterday, I put it in the fridge. The man sitting over there, I know him.
Mariela 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Meaning of the word 'wurst'

"I'm real sorry to 'ear that, sir. There's two or three o' my pals, anyhow, who remember 'er clear as anything, though we did only see 'er that wurst. Yes, we remember 'her all right." ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 415

1
2 3 4 5
15