Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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26 views

How to ask someone for cycling?

I moved into a new apartment and don't have any friend in this apartment. I want to make new friends but don't know how to initiate the conversation. I thought asking someone for cycling would be good ...
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1answer
21 views

what does mean by lose your phone?

I was watching a series of video about English teaching, I heard a word like lose your phone, I am not sure that whether the word is right or not, thanks everyone for helping me. Does anyone say to ...
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16 views

What kind of movie would you all like to watch? ---CORRECT?

I'm not sure about the following sentence-constructions: What kind of movie would you all like to watch? What kind of movie you all would like to watch? Which one is correct (and idiomatic)?
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27 views

'We put new carpet on the floor or we put [a] new carpet on the floor'?

I wonder should I precede the noun with the article 'a', but I don't think that is necessary? I put [a] new carpet on the floor. Reason: Carpet is a mass noun. Am I correct?
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33 views

How does that have anything to do with it?

Recently I was having a conversation in which someone said something off topic: Person 1: Hey do you like video games? Person 2: Yeah my favorite is..... Person 3: I'm hungry. Person 1: How ...
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5answers
11k views

Can fluent English speakers distinguish “steel”, “still” and “steal”?

Can fluent English speakers understand this sentence, the first time they hear it : What? They still steal steel? Can they hear a difference between the pronunciation of the words still, steal ...
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1answer
19 views

Dogs are the best pet/pets?

I always think that the best must be followed by a singular noun as follows: Dogs are the best pet. However, I found this while reading: Dogs are the best pets. Is this grammatically correct?
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1answer
25 views

Dilemma in using “so” or “too”

I always believe that the usage of so and too is different from each other: He is so busy until he is able to forget his problems. (=+ve sense) and another one He is too busy until he does not ...
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1answer
56 views

Learning accents

What is a good way to learn speaking english with good accent? I know english very well, but have a problem with speaking like a native speaker. I have a problem with the letter "r" and can't get ...
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1answer
23 views

Apart from a good student, he is a good son too

I argue that the following sentence is grammatically correct: Apart from a good student, he is a good son too. Wouldn't it better to say: Apart from being a good student, he is a good son too. I ...
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1answer
24 views

Why not simply put “ It is a kind of insect.” to “ It is an insect”?

I stumbled upon a sentence in my reference book. It states that: It is a kind of insect. Is there any specific reason for the author to use that kind of sentence construction? Wouldn't be easier ...
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1answer
17 views

A question regarding: Here is some medicine

My reference book gives me an example as follows: Here is some medicine. To me, it does not make sense since some implies things more than one; thus, should medicine becomes medicines? Having ...
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1answer
21 views

What loud thunder! or What a loud thunder!

My reference book gives me an example as follows: What loud thunder! Should it be written as: What a loud thunder!
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1answer
24 views

Vegetable or vegetables?

The book I'm using writes vegetable in a plural form. I don't think this is correct. Do you like strawberries or lettuce? No. I like neither fruit or vegetables. Should it be written as: ...
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1answer
33 views

“Your clothes are small size” — Is this grammatical?

I am having trouble with this sentence: Your clothes are small size. Would it be correct if I changed it to either: 1) Your clothes are small-sized. (=adjective) 2) Your clothes are small ...
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28 views

I don't know what the author trying to say

I was doing my revision, and I found these sentences in the grammar book I was using: 1) I know that a spider is a type of arthropod that makes webs to trap and eat prey. 2) I know what you mean, ...
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1answer
16 views

cause you to sleep late or affect your rest

The situation is, I phone somebody in his evening and I feel sorry because it's late. In my mother language, there's an expression like, "Sorry for causing you to sleep late" or "Sorry for affecting ...
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2answers
40 views

Lie on the same plane vs. Lie in the same plane

We in mathematics say (so if you'll have to use, what will sound natural to you "on/in"?): Two objects are coplanar if they both lie in the same plane. Or Two objects are coplanar if they both ...
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1answer
19 views

“Pay your way through”

I now "pay your way through" means paying for your expenses yourself or maybe parents can do that as well. Like: His parents payed his way through the college. But can it be used to mean "paying ...
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1answer
20 views

Root for or support (American English usage)

I had another question related to AmE usage.... I found out in a Dictionary that "support" isn't common in AmE and it is BrE. So is that so? Google Ngram says that "root for" isn't really common.. ...
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2answers
45 views

Leftover, scrap, extra cloth

If we cut a cloth a have a bit cloth left, will it sound idiomatic to use "leftover" or will it be more natural to use "scrap" or "extra cloth"?, Actually it a cloth is clised and a part of it is cut ...
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1answer
38 views

Turn it on from here/there; it has been turned off from here/there

If we have to talk about turning off the switch by using the place (main switch; like something is connected to a secondary power socket, which is in turn connected to the main socket) So something ...
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2answers
47 views

Food that feels a bit rough (though it was meant to be smooth)

What will be a natural way to describe the food that feels a bit rough though it was meant to be smooth? (Like something rough, gritty texture....) Will it be called "grainy", "gritty"? I mean it ...
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1answer
32 views

“On the double”, is it old-fashioned?(american English)

Under an explation of "on the double" by the Free Dictionary about "on the double", is it used in day-to-day conversations: Rapidly; faster than one normally goes. Can you please drive on ...
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1answer
23 views

Out of eye or with eye

Someone is having a vision problem.(that person can't see clearly wity one eye)So what should be used: I can't see with my left eye. I can't see out of my left eye. What would sound more ...
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1answer
24 views

“Far apart” vs “Far away” (about comparing two objects)

Are "far away" and "far apart" interchangeable in this context: A <--------->B A and B are far apart from each other. A and B are far away from each other. Are "apart" and "away" ...
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1answer
28 views

What’s the difference between ‘a hundred’ and ‘one hundred’? [duplicate]

For instance, let’s take a look at the next conversation: A) How many questions does the test have? B) A hundred. And the difference between the conversation above and this one: A) How many ...
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30 views

Are these two uses of “rip-off” common?

Under an entry for rip something off, The Free Dictionary says: To steal (something). A noun or pronoun can be used between "rip" and "off." The kids were caught going to different shops ...
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1answer
18 views

Paid extra vs paid extra cash

A peron was travelling on a cab. Later (by mistake) a person payed more than he had to pay,so what would be a natural way to express this idea: He paid extra cash to the driver. He paid extra ...
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2answers
51 views

Break off (ice-cream, spoon)

A small part of ice-cream is taken (from a brick of ice-cream) on a plate. So if someone is talking about taking a spoon and breaking off a small part, what will be a natural way to describe that: ...
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1answer
22 views

In front of people/to people (around people)

Does "in front of people" sound natural in English? . It is how you present yourself in front of people. It is how you present yourself to people. (It is how you present yourself when you are ...
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1answer
43 views

Go for tuition (extra classes) (private tutor)

This question is about the use of "tuition" in AmE. In America are there "private institutions" [not schools, universities]. So will it be okay to use: I go for tuition . What about: A:"Where ...
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2answers
29 views

Coming and going (for hiccups)

I know "I can't stop hiccuping" is natural. But if we have to say that "I stop hiccuping after a while only to start hiccuping again", is it okay to use: My hiccups are coming and going. Is the ...
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24 views

Do I need to know something except phrasal verbs and collocations to use colloquial English?

What do I really need to know about colloquial English except phrasal verbs and collocations?
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1answer
14 views

Hold on to the bike seat behind/from behind

Should "from" be included or dropped in this sentence? Hold on to the seat from behind. Hold on to the seat behind. Should "from" be included or dropped here? It is about a parent helping a ...
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1answer
19 views

Egg someone on to do something

Is the use of "egg on" common in colloquial American English? Is it used? I looked up its use on Ngram, but it dosen't hint at the actual usage, so I just felt like asking. To urge someone to do ...
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2answers
28 views

Which is grammatically correct, “I'm no Lord Ram” or “I'm not Lord Ram”? Why?

I'm reading "Immortals of Meluha" and while reading I encounter a sentence that was delivered by Shiva, he said "I'm no Lord Ram". What I'm thinking is that he should have said "I'm not Lord Ram". ...
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1answer
26 views

Is it okay to use “go to” with facial expressions

In Urban Dictionary I happened to stumble across a sentence. "This is my go-to expression". Is the use of "go-to" okay with facial expressions? Here it is: https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?...
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35 views

Showering with an antique shower

A person loves antique showers (showerhead). So is the use of "with" natural in this context?. He loves showering with an antique shower. (Shower = Showerhead) Is the use of "with" natural in this ...
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1answer
24 views

A part of the power has gone off

More than half of the appliances are working. But a few are not working because (it's not like half the power is out, actually more than half the power is on and just a part of it is out, maybe ...
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1answer
25 views

What do you use to express that the marker lines are visible on the other page

I drew something in pencil, then I outlined it with a black marker. Maybe it got too dark, and I could see the outline of that diagram on the other side of the page (when I turned the page.) I could ...
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5answers
153 views

Asking for something with different prices

I want to buy a Coke bottle. Now there are different prices of Coke for different amounts. So what will be a natural way to ask for a Coke of a particular price? Can I get a Coke priced $1.50. [I ...
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39 views

What is it called?

In English what is the terms used to refer to the hair on the sides of the head? Some people have it naturally and some people get a haircut. Like "the natural curls on the side of the face" or "...
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1answer
15 views

I'll pick you up/carry you on my back

A kid falls down and gets hurt, so her mother says: I'll pick you up on my back. Or I'll carry you on my back. What should be used: "pick up/carry"? Do both of them sound equally?
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2answers
48 views

Section two pieces, take two segments of hair

Will all the three sentences express this idea naturally? Section two roughly symmetrical pieces of your hair at the front. (Used by an American on a website.) Or Take two sections of your ...
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2answers
49 views

Dry fruits are hot [closed]

We do not eat a lot of dry fruits, and not especially during summers as they tend to increase our body temperature and heat us up and in excess can give rise to those nasty pimples as well. Now if we ...
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16 views

Is the use of “till” natural here?

I am writing about a book. So what should I use "till/to"? This book is so gripping, that it keeps you ensnared till the last word. This book is so gripping, that it keeps you ensnared to the ...
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22 views

I'm in (name) and she's in math or she's in math class

Here in my country, the eleventh graders are spilt up into fields like Commerce ,Medical , Non-Medical , Humanities. . So here's some basic knowledge: Commerce: Business Studies, Economics, Math, ...
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1answer
22 views

This was not a full deck, the deck was not full

A few people were playing cards. So in the end the person who lost thought that "a few cards were missing". So can be expressed as: This was not a full deck. The deck was not full. What ...
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28 views

Can you “change/exchange” it to an orange juice?

I know we don't ask the waiter to get us a different order once it has been put on our table, but anyways if you changed your mind and the waiter brought your order and you want to say "can I get an ...