Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5 votes
1 answer
488 views

Can I completely omit "of" when speaking quickly?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_der_x5Zxmc At 3:37 of this video the man says, as far as I'm concerned, "For portions of that first half we sort of dominated them". I've slowed the audio ...
2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Using the short form of the verb 'to be' in continuous aspect

I'm wondering if it is okay to use a short form of "to be" after nouns, as in the sentences: "The women 're working", "The birds're singing".
2 votes
2 answers
66 views

Using words "not" and "until" in the same sentence

For example, let's say someone said to me, "You did not need to wait until I was in the pool to hold me". I believe this can translate to something like, "You did not need to wait to ...
0 votes
2 answers
60 views

"children were sold to sweep the chimney" is it a valid structure

During that time children were sold to sweep the chimney. Here, the two works-- 1. selling, 2. sweeping are being done by two different people / group of people. The pencil is used to write ...
1 vote
3 answers
734 views

Complex sentences with when and until in reported speech – a problem with back-shift

Could anyone explain to me why, according to the key provided by my teacher, sentences below should be rendered in reported speech with no back-shift of certain verbs: "When I first came here," ...
-1 votes
1 answer
45 views

I can't understand the last line. What does the speaker want to say?

Graphic designers use a variety of design element to achieve artistic or decorative effects in print or electronic mediums to help determine the message, and the design should convey. Shouldn't it be: ...
1 vote
2 answers
57 views

How to say numbers correctly

1/ How can we say such numbers as 3.500, 27.500, etc.? Is it possible to say "three hundred and a half", "twenty seven and a half"? 2/ Is it ok to say 4.5 as "four point five&...
2 votes
1 answer
53 views

Is Doug pronounced dug or door-g?

I remember many years ago when I was in Durham, UK, people pronounce the name Doug as door-g. However, I look up the dictionary and Oxford dict online and many other sources, they clearly say that ...
0 votes
2 answers
45 views

"Indirect form" of the sentence

Direct: John said, "Do you know if Tom plays cricket." Indirect: John asked me if I know if Tom plays cricket. Is it correct grammartically and in terms of spoken English? Thanks in advance.
1 vote
2 answers
266 views

Where did we come out at/end up at

My mom was showing me around the city, so that I don't get lost and I know my way around when I'm alone. She kept asking me where we were. We were driving down a narrow street with huge buildings all ...
0 votes
3 answers
49 views

When speaking “I feel like ...” , where to pause?

Surrounded by the majestic mountains, breathtaking coastlines, and enjoying a warm, mild climate, I often feel like I’m residing in paradise on earth. When reading the last part of the sentence, ...
0 votes
1 answer
80 views

What's this linguistic, phonetic or phonologic phenomenon called?

I was enjoying the relaxing vibes that the hotel provided. When Americans say the above sentence, do they sometimes say "vibes that" as "vibesat"? Does it also happen in other ...
0 votes
1 answer
274 views

Opposite of "against someone's will" in this context

He sold their house against his father's will. I'm quite confused as to as what is the opposite of against someone's will in this context. Is it with someone's consent? Please tell me the most ...
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

Why does the rising pitch start from "in a rush" instead of "rush"?

YouTube: in a rush Please watch the video first. The image is the pitch contour from PRAAT. It shows that the rising pitch starts from "in a rush" instead of "rush". Is it because ...
0 votes
1 answer
422 views

Come from behind, sneak up on someone from behind,walk up to from behind

Our teacher was telling us about a "murder" in our psychology class. So she said: A man came from behind and stabbed a lady. A man sneaked up from behind and stabbed a lady. A man walked ...
33 votes
8 answers
6k views

Does “you can go now” sound rude? Context provided in question

As an IT guy in a college, I was helping a professor with his phone problems. After I was done helping him, I told him “you can go now.” to end the interaction as I had another student waiting for my ...
1 vote
3 answers
88 views

can i start a sentence after a preposition? [closed]

I just want to make sure that I can start a sentence after a preposition. because I have seen some sentences that were started with prepositions like this In the closet is where I keep the dog food. ...
1 vote
2 answers
48 views

How prevalent is the usage of the word prudent among native english speakers [closed]

I'm not certain if this is the appropriate place to inquire, but I have a question about the English language: I recently learned the word "prudent" and its meaning. However, I'm curious ...
2 votes
1 answer
134 views

If we can “give someone a call”, why can't we “give a phone call”?

According to Cambridge Dictionary a phone call (also phonecall) is something that you make, and provides the following examples Will you excuse me? I need to make a phone call. I've got a few phone ...
3 votes
2 answers
148 views

Is it my ears or is it the narrator pronouncing"...JAGGED CLIFFS" something like ".... JAG IL TIFFS."?

Cornered, the seals keep close to the jagged cliffs. BBC (see:1:19-1:23) I listened to it more than 10 times and suprised to hear the "...jagged cliffs" was pronounced something like ".....
1 vote
1 answer
169 views

What is the meaning of "Not actually"?

For example, let's say Person A says "1 plus 1 is 3". Then Person B can either say "It's not 3, it's 2" or "It's actually 2". What if Person B says "It's not ...
0 votes
2 answers
313 views

How to use "I am the one"

Is it correct to say the following? "I think I am the one who did it" Let's say In the past I created some article. But not sure whether I really created it or not. And at the same time ...
2 votes
3 answers
168 views

Do uncommon and rare both have same meaning? [duplicate]

"Do 'uncommon' and 'rare' both have the same meaning, and can one replace the other in a sentence?" Can you explain what is the correct usage. Uncommon (of an event, situation, or condition)...
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

Using The "Across" preposition in "The Pharmacy is across the Market" sentence is appropriate?

I wanted to ask if "across" can be used in daily life like that, or using "opposite" is a more proper one instead of "across"
3 votes
3 answers
109k views

Can I reply to "How are you doing?" with "I'm good"?

Ok, I've already searched this site. There are questions about this. I've read them and read the answers. But they don't really answer what I wonder. I'm asking about grammar. Let's say the cashier ...
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Sometimes 'to be' verb is not pronounced or pronounced well in a sentence in spoken English (new post with source) is this correct?

It seems that sometimes in spoken English, The verb to be is not pronounced (or not pronounced well). According to the examples given, is this correct? After comparing almost correct subtitles with ...
4 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Who you don't know their name" vs "Whose name you don't know"

From urbandictionary.com: (1) G - word used to call someone who you don't know their name my variant: (2) G - word used to call someone whose name you don't know As far as I understand, entry (1) is ...
0 votes
2 answers
136 views

What is it called?

In English what is the terms used to refer to the hair on the sides of the head? Some people have it naturally and some people get a haircut. Like "the natural curls on the side of the face" or "...
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Can you turn a declarative sentence into a interrogative sentence with changing pronunciation type or way of tone? [duplicate]

Looks like you can change a declarative sentence to interrogative by changing your way of speech. I have come across this several times, What do you think? Hey man, How's it going? -Hey fine, And you?...
1 vote
1 answer
51 views

I want to know about English grammar's passive and active voices?

Organization was formed to achieve specific goals. Is it passive voice or active voice? If it's passive voice then what is it expressed in an active voice?
2 votes
1 answer
309 views

What does the word "feedback" actually mean?

I googled the meaning and it tells me "'feedback' means 'information about reactions to a product, a person's performance of a task, etc. which is used as a basis for improvement'." However, ...
3 votes
1 answer
405 views

Using ing verbs

How many times can you use ing without it becoming wrong? The waiting room was empty except for an old man sitting in a corner reading a book. Is two times the limit? The waiting room was empty ...
1 vote
1 answer
95 views

Can I say "I'm doing this first than you"?

I don't think you can be first than someone, but I was thinking like some sort of competition. Would this be considered: The one that done it before you do?
-1 votes
1 answer
58 views

Do you pronounce discount or disgount?

I learned in English class that you should change pronunciation, k to g, t to d and p to b, that is immediately after s in spoken English, like express -> exbress and skill -> sgill. I am using ...
1 vote
1 answer
30 views

less than four miles of water

The following is a CNN trascript. Is something missing in the boldfaced part? I'm here in Taiwan. On a small island sitting surprisingly close to that bustling metropolis behind me, less than four ...
-3 votes
1 answer
52 views

Idiomatic translation of "把英语捡起来" in spoken English?

A friend informed me that they haven't been practicing English for a while and would like to "pick up" their English learning journey again. In Chinese, they say "我最近好久没学英语了,得把英语捡起来&...
2 votes
3 answers
180 views

What is the right pronunciation of "planned"?

Today in my English class my teacher taught us about the "plan" verb using it in present perfect. I was curious what is the right pronunciation of "planned" in American or British ...
3 votes
2 answers
801 views

When should I make a pause: before or after "that"?

Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that it would be harder to study chemistry or physics without a teacher's guidance than painting. I've always thought that I should say like "it seems to me ...
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

What does "the point being" mean in this sentence?

I watched a Selena Gomez speech (https://youtu.be/jG-4kBIDAzA?t=120). At 2:00, she said this below. When I was eleven, the point being is that when I was seven, I wanted to be an actress and I wanted ...
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

What does "apparently" mean in this conversation? [closed]

"Now we've got to give a bit of feedback about last term's modules - just short comments, apparently. Shall we do that now?" "OK. So medical terminology." I know "apparently&...
1 vote
2 answers
143 views

In a sentence with double negatives, how do I tell if I'm allowed to cancel them out or not?

Asking this because I'm worried that canceling out double negatives can completely change the original meaning of the sentence. I know context and the speaker/writer's intent are also important but is ...
2 votes
1 answer
171 views

"Pick me up and bring me" vs "carry me" vs other form

Let's say my child wants me to pick him up and carry him to his room, what should he say? What a native English speaker would say in this situation? "Daddy pick me up and bring me to my room&...
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Will the word "tell" work in the given context?

Is it possible to use the word "tell" in the provided context? If not, please, give your reason(s). She took part in school debates as the leader of the high school debate team, and ...
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Is “what color is she” colloquial?

I have a pony. What color is she? That’s sounds always wrong for me. Is it colloquial? I would always say: What color does she have? What is more common?
3 votes
2 answers
461 views

Can I drop the "h" sound in the words "himself", "herself" and "hers"?

We can drop the "h" in the words "he", "him", "his" and "her" if there is a consonant before them and if there is no punctuation between. For example like in "I like him." Can we do the same in the ...
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Conditional (if)

Nowadays, countless websites will only function if you open an account, which means providing them with an email address and some of your personal data. Nowadays, countless websites will only ...
0 votes
3 answers
851 views

The background of "Can you pass me the salt"

My textbook says that It is considered rude to reach out your hand and take something in front of others. Being Japanese myself, and when in Rome do as the Romans do is my policy, I'd rather they ...
0 votes
1 answer
154 views

What is the full expression of "welcome to X"?

We can say "Welcome to" + a place, like "Welcome to my website" or "Welcome to Berlin", to greet someone, but I don't know what the complete expression of "welcome ...
-1 votes
2 answers
59 views

What does "used to" mean in the definition part in a dictionary?

I modified the original question to make it clearer so that it could help more people. If you want to see the original question, please see the edit history or scroll down. -- I'm using the Longman ...
-1 votes
2 answers
40 views

How to say "Please save his portion for him to eat later" more natively and shortly?

Say one friend is absent at the time when we are eating out with friends. And maybe also the food is so great that we just couldn't stop eating more than we need. So, if I want to remind/tell my ...

1
2 3 4 5
15