Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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How to make syllable structure and sonority graph of "twelfths" and "grudged"?

I have an exam this week and I don't even know how to make syllable structure and sonority graph of the following words: grudged and twelfths. I was infected by COVID-19 and have not attended my ...
user avatar
30 votes
4 answers
8k views

How to get rid of mistakes in spoken English?

I started to learn English about 15 years ago. I cannot say that I was learning it all the time but I use it almost every day (reading, listening, sometimes speaking). My English level is not high, ...
MasterPJ's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
236 views

Answering about the time

I get up at 6 o'clock in the morning. I get up at 6 in the morning. Can I use sentense 2? When can I use only number without o'clock am pm etc?
Hein Zar Aung's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
91 views

What's the difference in pronunciation between case-sensitive and k-sensitive?

This question is probably simple, but the rule behind it may apply generally. My assumption is: If the end of a word duplicate the beginning of the next word, the beginning of the next word should be ...
Swa1n Suen's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
177 views

"I have got to sing" or "I have gotten to sing"

I know that normally in American English we use "gotten" after has/have but in this type of construction, do Americans say "got" or "gotten"? As in "I have got to ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
27 votes
10 answers
12k views

Can any time on clock be spoken as it is in numbers only (hour + minutes)?

According to the Cambridge dictionary, the answer for “What time is it?” depends on the minutes. When the times outside five-minute intervals, we say minutes past or minutes to: 9.01 one ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
18 votes
4 answers
16k views

How to pronounce the 'schwa' sound

I have seen lately many questions related to the pronunciation of the schwa (ə) sound. Today, I again found this question, What exactly is the "schwa" sound?, at EL&U, so I wanted to ask how the '...
Damkerng T.'s user avatar
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17 votes
2 answers
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How should I correct my spoken error?

Being an English language learner for about 30 years, I still make mistakes. In a written language, when I have misspelled and noticed it in a timely manner, I simply navigate to a wrong word and edit ...
Be Brave Be Like Ukraine's user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
8k views

How to Improve Intonation?

Anyone who has successfully improved intonation in a non-native environment? I consider myself as an expert of English grammar as well as when it comes expressing myself in speaking. At least that is ...
HarryPunjabi's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Delete the phrase "I'm" from the sentence by native speaker [duplicate]

I hear many native speakers say, for example, "glad to connect" or "Not sure about that". Where they delete "I am" at the beginning of the sentence, Is that kind of "short the talk", I mean to speak a ...
hbak's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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"ain't … nobody" or "ain't … anybody"?

I just watched a TV show and the guy says: I ain't trying to fight with nobody with a baby. So here, I can't understand the "nobody" since it make no sense to me, but it sounds like anybody, and ...
Jiehong Jiang's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
152k views

"You are" vs. "you're" — what is the difference between them?

“You are” vs. “you're” — what is the difference between them? I get confused between the two a lot. I want to understand how to use them appropriately, because I hate making mistakes.
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3 votes
1 answer
36k views

Meaning of "Orange is the new black" [duplicate]

There is a TV show by this name. And I heard someone saying it too. I googled its meaning but the effort went in vain.
Ardis Ell's user avatar
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2 votes
5 answers
13k views

What is difference between people and peoples?

Would anyone like to comprehensively explain? I am not sure peoples word exist or not. Kindly request to you all please explain about this. Thanks.
Ajit Kumar Dubey's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
5k views

Difference between "I'm home" vs "I'm at home"

What's the difference between these two sentences? And which one's grammatically correct?
Ardis Ell's user avatar
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21 votes
7 answers
572k views

Responding to "It was nice to talk to you"

How can I reply to "It was nice to talk to you" properly both formally and casually? Actually, I want to make this question a bit general, but since I heard this sentence a lot I used it as an ...
Mrt's user avatar
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10 votes
2 answers
15k views

What are some polite ways to respond to the people who call your name but you don't know them

I was waiting for the elevator to arrive at the ground floor and a man called my name. I turned to him and saw him looking at me but I could not recognize him. I was surprised because I did not ...
kitty's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
89k views

"I'm in" meaning?

I've seen these lines from the TV show Mom. A is a woman and B is a man A: So, should we do it? B: Yeah! Sure. A: Okay! Great! Tonight! Burgundy Bistro. 8:00 and I'll wear a red scarf. ...
dan's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
2k views

How to speak as well as a native English speaker?

I'm originally from central Europe, currently living second year in the UK. I work in an IT company surrounded only by native English speakers. I can feel that the speed I learn English has rapidly ...
user29467's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
504 views

Can even an expert use Conversational Deletion in his official place?

And when you’re drinking processed fruit juice, you’re also missing out on the healthy benefits of eating real fruit itself such as the fiber and vitamins. So you better off going back to eating ...
Listenever's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
17k views

"A little something something"?

This is about something as in "something something" and what I perceive to be variations thereof : (1) [word] something something [word] (2) [word] somethin' somethin' [word](3) A little something ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
461 views

How to pronounce a voiceless stop when it's at the end of a word which is behind a word that starts with a vowel?

I wonder if Americans usually make an unaspirated sound when the letters "k", "p" or "t" is at the end of a word and when the next word starts with a vowel. I know that I should make a flap sound when ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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3 votes
3 answers
926 views

Dropping the /t/ sound in words like, "wanted" [duplicate]

In my experience, a lot of Americans, on many occasions, don't make the standard /t/ sound in words like "wanted," "twenty," "accidentally," "presented," "...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Americans flap the /d/ of the consonant cluster /rd / if it is between two vowels, right?

I am like 99% sure that Americans do what I said in the title, but I wanted ask you anyway. My question is: When a word ends with /rd/ after a vowel and when the next word starts with a vowel, also in ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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2 votes
3 answers
76k views

Difference between "I've" and "I have"

Is there any textual usage difference between words like "I've" and "I have", or is it just an accent thing? e.g. I've finished my homework. I have finished my homework. It's a ...
Snazzy Sanoj's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
5k views

Wanted to not make / Wanted not to make / Didn't want to make

Which one would you choose in conversation? And I'd like to know the subtle difference. I would really appreciate it if you could help me. I wanted to not make a mistake. I wanted not to ...
jihoon's user avatar
  • 3,716
2 votes
1 answer
13k views

"How many months old" or "how old is your baby"?

Which one is correct between How many months old is your baby? and How old is your baby?? Which one is generally used?
Ardis Ell's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
73k views

"How much time" versus "how long"

Scenario: You're calling the taxi to come pick you up. The taxi driver says he can come pick you up soon. You: How long will it take you to get here? Taxi driver: It'll take me about about 20 ...
asef's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
254 views

When contract "used to" as "usta", is it pronounced /ə/ or /a/?

In everyday english, people like contracting words, for example, "used to" would be contracted as "usta". When people pronounce a single "usta", it sounds like /juːstah/; when people pronounce a ...
WXJ96163's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
138 views

Is "memory power" or "memory" used by native speakers

Many non-native speakers says: Someone has a good / bad memory power. Or Someone has a good / bad memory. Which is more appropriate to native speakers?
user100323's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
124 views

She's in my bus

If two people take the same school bus everyday to get back home, will it be natural to use: She's in my bus. Actually our teacher asked us if someone took the same bus as S. Actually we have ...
It's about English's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
949 views

In the natural way of speaking, How to pronounce "next stop"?

If I were reading this phrase I would read "next" "stop", but when people talks it seems to me they say something like "nextop". Is this a sort of shortening like "acopotee" instead of "a cup of tea"?
morgano's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
3k views

Let in imperative form which result in suggestion / proposal

Direct speech: He suggested to me, "Let us go to market." Indirect Speech: (A) He suggested to me to go to market. (B) He suggested to me that we should go to market. He said to me, "Let ...
asr09's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
23k views

Reported speech if sentence starts with let

1: Direct Speech: I said to my friend ,"good morning. Let us go for a picnic today. Indirect speech(book answer): I wished my friend good morning and proposed that we should go for a picnic that ...
starun008's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
180 views

"Since" in English language

I understand that ‘since’ is used to refer a point in the past till now. However I have a doubt on the below example. Please tell me which one is the correct? I have been working here since 2 ...
Sunil K's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
4k views

Meaning of "Like night follows day" [closed]

And, like night follows day, here it is. The complete silence. What does this phrase mean? it's from a novel called "I've got your no".
Ardis Ell's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
4k views

Can I say "I am sorry?" when I can't hear something?

As far as I know, we can say these when we can't hear something somebody said properly: "Excuse me?", "Sorry?" and "Pardon?". What about "I am sorry?"? Can I also say "I am sorry?" instead of "Sorry?"...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
350 views

Your ponytail is off to one side

Someone was trying to make a ponytail. So by mistake that person made it off to one side,(off-center i.e. not in the middle of the head) ,will it be natural to say: I did my ponytail a little bit ...
It's about English's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
265 views

The velcro has come off/undone. Lemme stick it for you

A kid is wearing shoes with velcro. So it wasn't sticking so the parent said: It has come off/come undone. Lemme stick it for you. And what about asking another person: Come on stick it back on!...
It's about English's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
76 views

Section two pieces, take two segments of hair

Will all the three sentences express this idea naturally? Section two roughly symmetrical pieces of your hair at the front. (Used by an American on a website.) Or Take two sections of your ...
It's about English's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
5k views

"Do you have English?" and "Do you know English?"

Are these questions natural? "Do you have English?" "Do you know English?" In this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXhDlYREJyo at 0:26, the subtitles read "Do you have Irish". Is that ...
Fire and Ice's user avatar
  • 1,304
0 votes
1 answer
86 views

Using "of" or "out of" big confusion

I'm really confused which one to use? 1- Don't make a big deal out of it 2- Don't make a big deal of it The second part : are the following sentence makes sense in terms of meaning and using the ...
Mohamed kz's user avatar