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Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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36 views

what's the part of speech of “underground” in following sentence

In the following sentence from CNN: Such fires were once plentiful in Azerbaijan, but because they led to a reduction of gas pressure underground, interfering with commercial gas extraction, most ...
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1answer
19 views

is it correct to ask “Is the class still on at 3?” . is there a better way to as this question?

I have my singing class at 3 and need to confirm with my instructor. Is this the right way to ask the question?
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1answer
12 views

“children were sold to sweep the chimney” is it a valid structure

During that time children were sold to sweep the chimney. Here, the two works-- 1. selling, 2. sweeping are being done by two different people / group of people. The pencil is used to write ...
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26 views
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46 views

“Match the answer” is the verb “match” natural in this context

Many math books are published with answer key to the exercises. Can I say: After solving the math problems you should match the answers to see if you have get them correct. Is the verb match is ...
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1answer
12 views

“past” or “left” in this context

I was driving home from my workplace. And on my way there was a big pizza shop. When I was about to reach home i got a call from my dad and he asked me to buy some pizza from that shop. But I had ...
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1answer
17 views

“out doing something” pattern

He is out drinking alcohol. My mom is out buying groceries. Does it mean: someone is not at home for doing some work somewhere else? Is the sentence pattern out doing something valid and ...
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2answers
531 views

“…saw someone out…”: grammatical role of “out”?

Sentences: My dad is out on vacation. I saw her out on a bicycle. Is the word out an adjective in this context? Or is the word out the short form of out of home? Thanks in advance.
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1answer
26 views

Is the word “uphill” limited to “hill” to English speakers

The children were running uphill towards the house. Is the word uphill (adjective and adverb) used only in the context of hill or for roads and any kind of surface as well? Can I say: The road is ...
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1answer
21 views

“Present” vs “future tense” in subordinate clauses in this context

A conversation between two friends: A: When will you come to our house. B: I will go when my mother goes / when my mother will go. I know that we are supposed to use only the present tense in ...
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1answer
26 views

“This / that much, this / that high, this / that thick” in spoken English

Conversation between two friends: A: Hey, John, how tall is your son? B: well, he has become this high.(showing with his hand) Two cute little kids are talking about their tv: A: Our new ...
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12 views

“In / with the same amount of time” in this context

I give tuition classes to three children in the evening. My friend yesterday told me that I can include few more children in the same batch. and I can make more money with / in the same amount of ...
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1answer
18 views

Would English speakers use “by themselves” here

I have heard from a friend of mine the statement below: The school never forces students to pay their fees; they pay their fees in time by themselves. I am aware of the fact that "by oneself" ...
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1answer
31 views

can someone pleas check is it correct usage of “as well as”? [closed]

"I am a young, passionate, just graduated from university developer. Looking for a dream team where I could get challenging tasks, interesting experience, new friends and an ...
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2answers
51 views

Is “could not have been done” more appropriate here? [on hold]

An extract from today's newspaper: Despite our best efforts and the hard work of various organizations, the boy could not be retrieved so far. Should I use: ...the boy could not have been ...
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1answer
78 views

If I learn British English, should I stop talking with Americans?

I had the opportunity to speak with several native speakers, It's fun, and they learn my native language, the problem is that several of my language partners speak with an American accent and the ...
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1answer
55 views

Is “memory power” or “memory” used by native speakers

Many non-native speakers says: Someone has a good / bad memory power. Or Someone has a good / bad memory. Which is more appropriate to native speakers?
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14 views

What is the need of “actually” here

How SIM cards work? How SIM cards actually work. Is the word "actually" asking for more precise answer? Thanks in advance.
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1answer
40 views

Understanding change of speech

in the following questions, a sentence has been given in Direct / Indirect Speech. Out of the four alternatives suggested, select the one which best expresses the same sentence in Indirect/Direct ...
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2answers
435 views

“say” or “tell” in this context

Teacher: Who can say the multiplication table from 1 to 10. Or, Teacher: Who can tell me the multiplication table from 1 to 10. Which of the two sentences is more appropriate for a teacher to use ...
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1answer
17 views

“As for” meaning in this context

An extract from an article: For global climate change, as for hunger, the countries that experience the worst problems have the fewest resources to address them. What does as for mean here? ...
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26 views

Is “having” necessary here [duplicate]

Today I heard a sentence: Do you want more potatoes peeled. But I have always used it as: Do you want having more potatoes peeled. Which one is grammartical? Please explain with examples. ...
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1answer
28 views

“No more someone doing something” meaning

By the phrase no more we mean Someone doesn't want something anymore. Eg: Son: Mom, I am going to play cricket. Mom: No more cricket! Your exams are very close. The same way, can I say: No ...
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1answer
24 views

“Survivors clinging to a raft.” Is this sentence right?

"Survivors clinging to a raft." There is no verb in this sentence. I know this sentence is not the present progressive/present continuous. But can this sentence be used independently? I found this ...
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1answer
45 views

“I learn a lot talking to you” vs. “I learn a lot by talking to you” [duplicate]

I've heard both of the sentences: I learn a lot talking to you. I learn a lot by talking to you. Does the first one means I learn a lot while I talk to someone and the second I learn a lot as ...
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1answer
37 views

words that starts with c but does not sound as k [closed]

The title say it all, i'am looking for all the list of words which starts with c but does not sound as k, as many know most of the words that starts with c usally have a k sound in it, e.g cat,clam,...
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22 views

English practice [duplicate]

Iam a new learner but i canť completely understand English films or distinguish between the words when I hear it And What is the best way to acquire the sense of language? And is that take too ...
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1answer
22 views

“John's” or “of John” in this context

In the sentences below: All the mistakes are mine. Likewise, All the mistakes are John's. Now, Can we say: All the mistakes are of me. And All the mistakes are of John. Are these ...
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2answers
22 views

Sentence without subject in this context

We often hear sentences like: Wishing you a very happy birthday. Wish you a very happy birthday. We are a omitting the subjects in these sentences. Are these grammartically correct or just a ...
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2answers
21 views

Adjective for the noun “scraps” in this context

Leftover food is called scraps. Now, I kept a whole plate of soup on the table for my dad, suddenly my brother came and lifted the plate and just licked the soup and saying that tasted disgusting ...
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9 views

More appropriate “participial clause” here--

He took all my books, threatening to throw them if I revealed his secrets. Taking all my books, he threatened me to throw them if I revealed his secrets. Do they both mean the same? Which is ...
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1answer
13 views

“Indirect form” of the sentence

Direct: John said, "Do you know if Tom plays cricket." Indirect: John asked me if I know if Tom plays cricket. Is it correct grammartically and in terms of spoken English? Thanks in advance.
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83 views

What is the difference between “to be Ving” and “to V”?

For example, (1)You are too young to be contemplating retirement. (2)You are too young to contemplate retirement.
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3answers
24 views

“Just” for recent future

As we use the word just for recent past: I've just arrived. They just completed their task when the manager called. Now, Can I use just for recent future that is going to happen shortly? As ...
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1answer
27 views

What is the difference between “the+singular countable noun” and “zero article+plural countable noun”

What is the difference between "the + singular countable noun" and "zero article + plural countable noun" when we make generalisations about classes of things.
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1answer
81 views

Is “North.5” the same as “0.5”?

I've just heard a native English speaker saying this: "North.5" which means: 0.5 I mean seriously?! What kind of number is that? I may have misheard him but in mathematics, I've never heard of ...
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1answer
72 views

Is the word “homophone” misleading?

I remember a language learning app that claimed to help users to distinguish between the words like right-write, break-brake, heal-heel, principle-principal, etc. However, I have long known them as ...
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1answer
20 views

What Marge says about Giant's Causeway?

I have seen the following video, where Marge and Family go to the Giant's Causeway. I don't fully understand what she says, even if I slow the playback speed. This is the video: https://www.youtube....
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2answers
348 views

“Where do you lived?” or “Where did you live?”

Which is the correct question? Similarly, "When did you move to New York?" or "When do you moved to New York?". Please tell me the reason behind each question.
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1answer
53 views

A (imaginary) point or An (imaginary) point

A or An is usually decided by whether you pronounce the beginning of the following word as a consonant or not. Does a word in parentheses count as ' following'? A (imaginary) point or An (imaginary) ...
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2answers
94 views

How to answer, how old is your baby?

My question is how to answer when somebody asks this question? Since my baby is 10 months, I just replied she is 10, and we laughed out loud. Then I said, of course, 10 months. What is the correct ...
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1answer
34 views

Take up doubts, a topic

When a teacher discusses something in the class, is it be okay to use "take up"? We'll take up this topic tomorrow. We'll take up X tomorrow. And about "doubts" and "queries": We'll take ...
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1answer
57 views

“Let's talk math/geography…” meaning

I was reading this article (linked below the sentence) when I came across this: First, let’s talk geography. -- Smithsonian Magazine I could get what it means but the grammar behind it is ...
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1answer
23 views

Can the word “help” be used as the example sentence below

Does "thanks for making me feel like it's a help" make sense ?
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41 views

How to ask someone for cycling?

I moved into a new apartment and don't have any friend in this apartment. I want to make new friends but don't know how to initiate the conversation. I thought asking someone for cycling would be good ...
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1answer
24 views

what does mean by lose your phone?

I was watching a series of video about English teaching, I heard a word like lose your phone, I am not sure that whether the word is right or not, thanks everyone for helping me. Does anyone say to ...
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22 views

What kind of movie would you all like to watch? ---CORRECT?

I'm not sure about the following sentence-constructions: What kind of movie would you all like to watch? What kind of movie you all would like to watch? Which one is correct (and idiomatic)?
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1answer
35 views

'We put new carpet on the floor or we put [a] new carpet on the floor'?

I wonder should I precede the noun with the article 'a', but I don't think that is necessary? I put [a] new carpet on the floor. Reason: Carpet is a mass noun. Am I correct?
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116 views

How does that have anything to do with it?

Recently I was having a conversation in which someone said something off topic: Person 1: Hey do you like video games? Person 2: Yeah my favorite is..... Person 3: I'm hungry. Person 1: How ...
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6answers
12k views

Can fluent English speakers distinguish between “steel”, “still”, and “steal”?

Can fluent English speakers understand this sentence the first time they hear it? What? They still steal steel? Can they hear a difference between the pronunciation of the words still, steal, and ...