Questions tagged [spoken-english]

The way in which English is spoken, either formally or informally. As opposed to written usage.

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1answer
14 views

Whether this sentence is grammatically and semantically correct?

Indian constitution is not as flexible and rigid as British constitution and American constitution respectively.
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Is the use of these words in English ever happens by English speakers? [closed]

I find it difficult to use following words while speaking english. Also no examples have been provided in internet. Latibule(N) Noceur Radamancy (N) Meraki (N) Resfeber Etc.
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Does the verb “stitch” need preposition for specification?

As a learner I use the verb stitch without any prepositions / adverbs, like: I need to stitch the rip in my shirt. Today I read: ...stitch it up and stitch it down. Do up and down here shows ...
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15 views

“don't I need to” at the beginning of a question

is "don't I need to" a correct way of beginning a question? for example: "Don't I need to write it down" was the sentence I had formed but doesn't appear to be smooth. I'm in a confusion regarding ...
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1answer
119 views

Pronunciation of “what” with an / h / sound

In old american documentaries I noticed that they would pronounce the word what with an / h / sound. But these days it is not pronounced with the / h / sound. I wonder if anybody would explain. ...
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What is the meaning of “Here goes“ or “Here it goes”? [duplicate]

I am quite confused about how to use, "Here goes” or "Here it goes". For example, what, if anything, is the meaning of the following phrase: Here goes nothing!
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Meaning of Dip Out

Definition- to miss out on or fail to participate in something Example- He dipped out on the examination In above definition, it is not clear whether the action (failing to participate) is ...
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1answer
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Can I use What's up as the meaning of What's the problem? [closed]

like if someone tryna fight me then can I use the word sup as the meaning of what's your problem?
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…at the bottom-back of your shirt

As we regularly use: at the top-left, at the bottom right etc. for describing a picture. But how should I express that my shirt has a cut at the back that is at the bottom. Can I say: There is ...
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1answer
22 views

How to identify right pronunciation?

I always wonder what is the reason for pronunciation of certain (group of) letters to change when used in a word. For example, the letter 'o' changes it's pronunciation to 'ʌ' rather than 'oʊ' when ...
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What a granny is supposed to say to respond to “Thank You”?

A post gives "8 Ways to Respond to Thank You". I didn't find one is appropriate the following situation. Imagine that, a granny prepares a breakfast for her grandson. Grandson: thank you, granny. ...
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1answer
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Pine, spruce and fir in informal spoken English

Do native English speakers distinguish pines, spruces and firs in informal spoken English? Can it be that for most people they are just pine trees and people rarely use "spruce" or "fir" in their ...
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“Go over for” meaning “go for”

A line from the movie Killers grates. You just pulled a robot voice. All right, don't worry. There's a certain segment of the population that goes over big for that sort of thing. (for more context ...
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“The place under the bed” is correct?

My brother was sweeping the house the other day, and I asked him: Have you already swept the place under the bed? As a learner I didn't find any other alternative to talk about the place / space ...
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51 views

How important to use whether during speaking?

Most of time when I am speaking I forget to use "whether", and when I reach to the end of my sentence I find that I had to apply it in my sentence then I correct my sentence with the addition of "...
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2answers
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Would a native speaker use the word “dismiss” to talk about “school”?

In our country people use dismissal time to talk about end of a day at school: What is the dismissal time of this school? And sometimes: What time does the school dismisses? I have checked few ...
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use of “over” with “distance”

I usually say: I travel a long distance to get to work. Today I saw: It travels over a long distance. I didn't find any information about over a long distance. Please help. Thanks in advance....
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Looking for a verb that describes stopping the light of the candle

If I have a candle which is lightning and I want to stop it by my touching the wick and stop it mechanically by my fingers at the moment because I want to sleep. Do I want to extinguish it, or to put ...
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1answer
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When contract “used to” as “usta”, is it pronounced /ə/ or /a/?

In everyday english, people like contracting words, for example, "used to" would be contracted as "usta". When people pronounce a single "usta", it sounds like /juːstah/; when people pronounce a ...
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1answer
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What “verb” to use for “stop flowing” in this context

Do not let the rain water (...blank)... otherwise mosquitoes can emerge as a big problem. Can I use the verbs like: gather or accumulate? I would like to know both the spoken and formal. Thanks ...
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“Located”, “situated” or nothing

The stadium is situated in London. The stadium is located in London. The stadium is in London. Could anyone please tell me the difference? Which one is preferred in spoken English? Thanks ...
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2answers
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It sounds like “are” is eaten in “you're”, is this a common accent or my mis listening?

I am not a native English speaker, so I have some difficulties on catching some pronunciation in spoken English. This guy is lecturing (https://youtu.be/_nRtCVJIToA?t=251) You had an idea, you had ...
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2answers
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“Internally” or “from inside” --what to use?

In this sentence: He may look rude but he is very kind from inside / internally. As a non-native speaker I am very confused about this. What, in a native speaker's opinion, is best here? Can I ...
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Is the word “am” natural here?

In this sentence: On a typical day, by 9pm I am done cooking. I am not a native speaker, does it sound natural to native speakers?
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The word “go” with different kinds of “sounds”

I heard the sentence from someone: When we prickle a balloon with a needle it goes bang! Is the sentence valid? Can I say: It goes swish. as well? Thanks in advance.
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“Get / make something + adjective”

As a learner I always use: Make something adjective, as in, I need to make it clean. But today I saw: You need to rub hard to get it clean. Are they both valid to a native speaker?
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“5 metres away”, “4 metres high”— are these correct?

If someone asks me: How far and high can you throw the ball? Can I answer with: I can throw the ball five metres away and 4 metres high. Are the question and the answer natural to the ear of a ...
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Would native speakers use the word “unit” here?

How many are there in a dozen? Or, How many units are there in a dozen? As a learner the second sentence seems better to me. How would native speakers say this? Also, Is the sentence: How ...
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Native speaker's word in this context

I have a wooden bed with four legs. When I get up in the morning I put it up on it's side and when I go to bed I put it down. Can I say: After getting up in the morning, I put up (erect) my bed. ...
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“want sth spent” or “want sth to be spent”

I don't want my life spent in vain. I don't want my life to be spent in vain. Which one is more natural and grammartical to native speakers? Thanks in advance.
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Correct syntax with “there”

I often see these kinds of sentences with there: There are playing three boys in the playground. There are three boys playing in the playground. As a learner I would like to know whether ...
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Is the phrase“come flying” natural

Can I say: A ghost came flying and picked me up. Here I am trying to say the manner of movement. Similarly can I say: came running, walk breathing very hard? In our language it's natural. How ...
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A problem about “neither… nor”

I'm going to work and my 10-year-old son is staying alone at home until I come back. So before leaving I say to him: Do not play video games nor eat ice cream. Or, Neither play video games nor ...
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Mentioning about some one appearance

I want to say someone appearance that he is thin..if I ask the following question to him, is it correct? "You have got thin" is this sentence correct?
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What is the meaning of this “ ones short leaves in war”?

"Perhaps all this is merely a legacy from ones short leaves in the war" is an excerpt from "big four" by agatha christie "Ones short leaves in war " in the big four by agatha christie
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“I will say it is better” emphasizing “will”

In my shop I am selling a new thing. And a customer asks me about the quality of the new thing. And I responded by saying: I will say it is better, since I am selling it. First use then see. Here ...
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2answers
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“For another same amount of time” in this context

The bus arrives at our local bus stop at 8am. The other day my brother and I were going to catch the bus and we went to the bus stop at 7:50am so we had to wait for 10 minutes. My 10-year-old brother ...
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Opposite of “against someone's will” in this context

He sold their house against his father's will. I'm quite confused as to as what is the opposite of against someone's will in this context. Is it with someone's consent? Please tell me the most ...
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Is it grammatically correct to ask 'what do you mean [word/phrase]?'?

I often hear something like 'what do you mean "gone"?' I've been wondering whether the omission of the preposition 'by' ('what do you mean [by] "gone"?') complies with the grammar rules.
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Drawing attention from distance

How can I draw my school principal's attention from distance? Can I say: Hello sir, I need to speak to you. (out loud) Now, my friend is passing by my house. I want to talk to her just for one or ...
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In spoken, is 'with' droppable in “I won't let you through with this”

I won't let you through with this. I've heard the sentence in an American TV show. The scene is in a security check point. A man carried something that was suspected to be a bomb, so the security ...
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Is “go and do something” formal enough to use in this context

We use go and do something / go do something with our friends, such as: Rob, go and buy some food for me. Hey sweetie, go and play outside. Can I use this pattern in the context given below: ...
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How to understand “No she bludgering well won't!”

"She's only Stunned," said Professor McGonagall impatiently, who had stooped down to examine Alecto. "She'll be perfectly all right." "No she bludgering well won't!" bellowed Amycus. "Not after ...
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“Not a bad little haul for one night” meaning

"It is you! If they find out who they've got --! They're Snatchers, they're only looking for truants to sell for gold --" "Not a bad little haul for one night," Greyback was saying, ... ... ...
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“ 'e's put a bit of work our way” meaning

"Scan Shunpike," said Ron. "Like 'ell you are," said the man called Scabior. "We know Stan Shunpike, 'e's put a bit of work our way." Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows "'e's put a bit ...
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In spoken English, is it correct to reply with a verb phrase in its simple present form?

In spoken English, is it correct to reply with a verb phrase in its simple present form when the speaker omits the subject? Or the phrase should be used in the corresponding tense. Example 1 A: ...
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Do you have or have you?

I am a English learner and I still don't understand why the auxiliary verb "to do" doesn't appear with the verb "to have". Is it wrong to say "She doesn't have brown hair"?
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Did you hear that or Have you heard that

Could you please help me to understand which sentence sounds more correct (and explain why), or suggest your own version? Did you hear that John has made a fortune with his new business? Have you ...
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what's the part of speech of “underground” in following sentence

In the following sentence from CNN: Such fires were once plentiful in Azerbaijan, but because they led to a reduction of gas pressure underground, interfering with commercial gas extraction, most ...
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is it correct to ask “Is the class still on at 3?” . is there a better way to as this question?

I have my singing class at 3 and need to confirm with my instructor. Is this the right way to ask the question?

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