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Questions tagged [stative-verbs]

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0answers
29 views

Is “succeed” stative

I think succeed is a stative verb because it seems not to have a progressive form, as "We are succeeding in ..." is not common. I want to confirm it.
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2answers
31 views

“Someone has a relationshio with someone” or “someone is having a relationship with someone”?

Do I have to use have in the present simple or present continuous when talking about being in a relationship. For example: Kate has a relationship with the guy. Kate is having a ralationship ...
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1answer
30 views

Is it natural to use the verb “want” in the continuous form to express a strong desire for something or to do something?

I am aware that the verb want is a stative verb and many grammar books and teachers say it is correct to use it in the continuous form. But as is the case with lot of stative cases, there some ...
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0answers
42 views

“I was” vs “I have been”

I know we use present perfect tense to talk about past actions which has present relevences and simple past to talk about our past activities.When we use a stative verb in present perfect I see that ...
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2answers
48 views

Can “prefer” be used as a dynamic (non-stative) verb?

My friend had a homework exercise about stative verbs in their English class and asked me to help with it. The task was to mark sentences that were correct. There was one difficult sentence there: ...
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1answer
35 views

Is the word 'remind' is stative verb? (remind vs. reminding)

Is the word remind a stative verb? (which means that even if I'm talking about something that's happening right now, I still have to use this infinitive verb without turning it into present continuous ...
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3answers
84 views

Is “become” both stative and dynamic verb

Since it is OK to say "The house is becoming more expensive", become can be a dynamic verb for dynamic verbs allow the progressive tense. I wonder if become is also considered as a stative verb.
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1answer
252 views

I am finding it/ I find it difficult to understand English [closed]

I am finding it dificult to understand English I find it difficul to understand English When the power broke down, I found it difficult to feel the switch.So my daughter helped me ...
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1answer
16 views

What is the appropriate tense for factual statements after a stative verb in the past tense?

Assuming that cats are evil (they aren't), which is the correct way of saying this? "I believed that cats are evil." "I believed that cats were evil." My confusion arises because I want to express ...
4
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1answer
71 views

Can Present Perfect with a stative verb be used to describe a finished action?

I learned that if a stative verb was used in present perfect form, this would indicate an unfinished/continuing action, i.e "I have liked pasta since I was a baby." However, there are also cases such ...
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1answer
43 views

Can I use “being” with “keep”?

Action verbs used with "keep" sound normal, like "keep doing," "keep smiling," etc., but "being" sounds weird with it. For example, this: I won't talk to you if you keep being rude.
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2answers
654 views

“Are you hearing me” Vs. “Do you hear me”?

When I learnt English grammar I was told that some of the senses don't get "ing" of present continuous, therefore we should say "I see it now" rather than "I'm seeing it now". On the same logic, "I ...
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1answer
36 views

Correct use of stative verbs

My question is what is correct to say : This concerns you. This is concerning you.
2
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1answer
40 views

is the verb “lie” in the sense of telling lies always stative?

I was watching Lord of the Rings, and in the scene where the ork said that Aragorn had fallen off the cliff, Legolas said: "you lie". Why did he say it in the present simple time? Wouldn't the present ...
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1answer
326 views

Stative verbs with present perfect simple

First of all, 1. Can I use stative verbs with the present perfect simple? For example, know is a stative verb, Can I say: Have you known my real name is John? In sentence about I meant to ask, *...
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1answer
47 views

Doubt about “be/get used to + stative verbs”

I am not confident about the ing form in stative verbs when using be/get used to. Do I have to use the ing form even if there are stative verbs? For example which one of these sentences is correct? ...
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1answer
70 views

Does “He started remembering” breach the laws of english grammar?

He started remembering his past days and got really emotional about it. vs He remembered his past days and got really emotional about it. Does the 1st sentence breach the laws of English grammar? ...
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1answer
55 views

“She has all the things” in the passive

On Quora this question seems to have a lot of wrong answers: What is the passive voice of "She has all the things''? When we put a phrase with a stative verb like "have" into the passive shouldn't ...
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1answer
865 views

What is the difference between abstract noun and stative verb?

A noun has several types, like proper, common, collective, etc.; while verbs can be classified as transitive and intransitive. what is the difference between noun and verb? what is the difference ...
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1answer
41 views

Owning something temporarily

If something is coming into my possession temporarily, and then I would like/have to relinquish ownership of it for whatever reason, is it then grammatical to say: "I'm owning it for two months only"? ...
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2answers
876 views

Stative Verbs in Present Perfect Tense to Refer Recent Past

"I have just wanted to ask a question." I was told above sentence is not valid and natural to refer recent past and "just" cannot mean here "very recently".( Recent past usage of present perfect ...
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1answer
164 views

Why do we use present progressive in this case?

We learned that present progressive form is not available when related to the human emotion we have. But I can see the example using 'present progressive' in the sentence. for example, 'I am still ...
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2answers
436 views

Which verb form to use before 'understanding it'?

She won't be understanding it She won't have been understanding it She might not be understanding it She might not have been understanding it As far as I know 'understand' is a stative verb so -ing ...
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1answer
98 views

How to state an activity?

How can I state an current state of an activity? For example:- The process was completed or The process has completed ?
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3answers
680 views

difference between “He was dead by the time the doctor arrived” and “He had been dead by the time the doctor arrived”

He was dead by the time the doctor arrived He had been dead by the time the doctor arrived. As a non-native speaker, I think these two sentences are grammatically right. As for me, #2 seems to ...
2
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3answers
13k views

“He is good looking” vs “He is looking good” [duplicate]

He is good looking. He is looking good. How to understand "looking" in the first sentence? Is it exactly the same meaning as in #2?
4
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1answer
256 views

Does “The girl feeling no pain is my sister” make sense?

This website provide this following info: Some action verbs reduce to the present participle (ing form) especially when the present tense is used. Remove the relative pronoun Change the ...
2
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1answer
387 views

Is there something like “infinite perfect tense”?

Normally 'they' say "Make your tenses agree!" OK, but I read the following first-person description: “Alex had explained, and I am content because of it.” The “I am” should be “I was” by the above ...
6
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3answers
58k views

I know him. He is known to me

I am really dejected about the "Passive sentence" of this "Active sentence" = I know him. One of my friends told me that "He is known to me" is not a passive sentence. He said that it is like this "...
5
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3answers
308 views

“I am wanting food”; Does it sound strange or not?

I am wanting food. OR I want food. If I really want food right now, should I use present continuous or present simple tense?
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1answer
391 views

Past perfect vs past simple in decision making and consequences

I came across the following exercise: complete with one word There was a man who ____ ice-skating so much that he ____ to make a crude skate with wooden wheels to use during the ____ (unrelated ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “Understanding of Each Other” correct?

The word "understanding" is a noun and also an adjective. The verb "understand" is non-dynamic. "Each other" is a pronoun that deals with reciprocal action. In standard British English, can this ...
4
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1answer
2k views

sat or were sitting

Please have a look at this I stood in front of the living room, watching the movie unfold on the tv screen while my mom and sister - whose idea it was to watch the film in the first place - sat ...
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2answers
4k views

Using 'like' on a continuous tense

From the movie Misery: — You're being taken seriously. — I'm delighted the critics are liking it. Is the use of like correct in its continuous form? I know that state verbs are not normally used ...
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3answers
233 views

Progressive use of stative verbs [duplicate]

I was wondering if it would be possible to say: "I have been wanting to go to iceland now for more than 10 years!". given the fact that 'want' is a stative verb it is not common to use a progressive ...
2
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1answer
221 views

Use of “I'm loving”

The couple screenshots are taken from Riddick 2013: The two characters use "I'm loving", which I think is very informal. Does the present progressive tense convey any subtle nuances which the simple ...
4
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1answer
151 views

Use of stative verbs in the progressive tense to express relatively long-lasting situations

I've heard native speakers saying things like: I've been liking her/loving her/wanting to be with her for a long time now. They are having a bath. I'm wanting to go on vacation, but I don't have ...
2
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1answer
889 views

Is it allowed to use stative verbs in their progressive form?

"How are you feeling today?" "Are you seeing him?" "I'm feeling well." "The car is standing in the garage." Are those examples all grammatically false? If they are not, how can I ...
5
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1answer
696 views

Is this correct to say “You are having incorrect installer”?

Which one is correct to say? "You are having incorrect installer." or "You have incorrect installer."
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1answer
4k views

Adverb “now” in the present simple and the continuous

On the use of present simple and continuous, the business textbook I have (Market Leader) says the time expression "now" is used in the present continuous, but in the exercise below where "now" is ...
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1answer
1k views

usages of “would rather” and “would prefer”

1) I would prefer you did not mention it. 2) I would prefer you not to mention it. 3) I would rather you didn't mention it. 4) I would rather you not to mention it. Would you possibly ...
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8answers
123k views

You look good vs You are looking good

I have been told that 'you look good' is the perfect compliment to give. Because 'you are looking good' is not colloquial. How correct is it? For example, if I have to ask others about myself: How ...
5
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1answer
122 views

Is there a rule of thumb to distinguish stative verbs from nonstative ones?

Is there some rule of thumb to successfully distinguish stative verbs from nonstative ones?
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1answer
294 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

In what form should I put nonstative verbs with "when"? E.g., (1) You have to be careful when you cut a cake. (2) You have to be careful when you are cutting a cake. Is there a difference ...
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4answers
9k views

“I am not really liking it very much…” vs “I don't really like it very much…”

Could someone please tell me what is the difference between the two sentences below? 1 - I am not really liking it very much over there. 2 - I don't really like it very much over there.
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1answer
33k views

“I didn't know” or “I haven't known”?

Suppose that in a conversation, our conversational partner just said something completely new to us, and we want to express that we didn't know (or haven't known) about it before. For example, A: ...
3
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1answer
2k views

“is being on something”

The second sentence causes me problems. I have seen it somewhere. For me it looks like the verb to be is used twice (is / being). Is it grammatically correct? If yes, what does the second usage give ...
6
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1answer
87 views

Is “be” always stative?

Can I use the verb be in present perfect continuous tense or it is always stative? Are there any exceptions?
6
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1answer
3k views

Is the word “think” stative or dynamic?

When can I use present continuous for think?
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2answers
598 views

What is the proper use of the present progressive form, especially of “to have”?

When I read @ctype.h's question 'Is "I am having a code" grammatically correct?', I thought that @Mark Beadles brought up a good point: This is two questions, though you may not realize it. The ...