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Questions tagged [stative-verbs]

The tag has no usage guidance.

0
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1answer
28 views

Correct use of stative verbs

My question is what is correct to say : This concerns you. This is concerning you.
2
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1answer
31 views

is the verb “lie” in the sense of telling lies always stative?

I was watching Lord of the Rings, and in the scene where the ork said that Aragorn had fallen off the cliff, Legolas said: "you lie". Why did he say it in the present simple time? Wouldn't the present ...
0
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1answer
76 views

Stative verbs with present perfect simple

First of all, 1. Can I use stative verbs with the present perfect simple? For example, know is a stative verb, Can I say: Have you known my real name is John? In sentence about I meant to ask, *...
0
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1answer
30 views

Doubt about “be/get used to + stative verbs”

I am not confident about the ing form in stative verbs when using be/get used to. Do I have to use the ing form even if there are stative verbs? For example which one of these sentences is correct? ...
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1answer
53 views

Does “He started remembering” breach the laws of english grammar?

He started remembering his past days and got really emotional about it. vs He remembered his past days and got really emotional about it. Does the 1st sentence breach the laws of English grammar? ...
0
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1answer
50 views

“She has all the things” in the passive

On Quora this question seems to have a lot of wrong answers: What is the passive voice of "She has all the things''? When we put a phrase with a stative verb like "have" into the passive shouldn't ...
0
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1answer
385 views

What is the difference between abstract noun and stative verb?

A noun has several types, like proper, common, collective, etc.; while verbs can be classified as transitive and intransitive. what is the difference between noun and verb? what is the difference ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Owning something temporarily

If something is coming into my possession temporarily, and then I would like/have to relinquish ownership of it for whatever reason, is it then grammatical to say: "I'm owning it for two months only"? ...
3
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2answers
741 views

Stative Verbs in Present Perfect Tense to Refer Recent Past

"I have just wanted to ask a question." I was told above sentence is not valid and natural to refer recent past and "just" cannot mean here "very recently".( Recent past usage of present perfect ...
0
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1answer
147 views

Why do we use present progressive in this case?

We learned that present progressive form is not available when related to the human emotion we have. But I can see the example using 'present progressive' in the sentence. for example, 'I am still ...
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2answers
342 views

Which verb form to use before 'understanding it'?

She won't be understanding it She won't have been understanding it She might not be understanding it She might not have been understanding it As far as I know 'understand' is a stative verb so -ing ...
1
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1answer
98 views

How to state an activity?

How can I state an current state of an activity? For example:- The process was completed or The process has completed ?
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3answers
447 views

difference between “He was dead by the time the doctor arrived” and “He had been dead by the time the doctor arrived”

He was dead by the time the doctor arrived He had been dead by the time the doctor arrived. As a non-native speaker, I think these two sentences are grammatically right. As for me, #2 seems to ...
1
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1answer
9k views

“He is good looking” vs “He is looking good”

He is good looking. He is looking good. How to understand "looking" in the first sentence? Is it exactly the same meaning as in #2?
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1answer
245 views

Does “The girl feeling no pain is my sister” make sense?

This website provide this following info: Some action verbs reduce to the present participle (ing form) especially when the present tense is used. Remove the relative pronoun Change the ...
2
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1answer
308 views

Is there something like “infinite perfect tense”?

Normally 'they' say "Make your tenses agree!" OK, but I read the following first-person description: “Alex had explained, and I am content because of it.” The “I am” should be “I was” by the above ...
6
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3answers
43k views

I know him. He is known to me

I am really dejected about the "Passive sentence" of this "Active sentence" = I know him. One of my friends told me that "He is known to me" is not a passive sentence. He said that it is like this "...
5
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3answers
243 views

“I am wanting food”; Does it sound strange or not?

I am wanting food. OR I want food. If I really want food right now, should I use present continuous or present simple tense?
0
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1answer
306 views

Past perfect vs past simple in decision making and consequences

I came across the following exercise: complete with one word There was a man who ____ ice-skating so much that he ____ to make a crude skate with wooden wheels to use during the ____ (unrelated ...
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2answers
2k views

Is “Understanding of Each Other” correct?

The word "understanding" is a noun and also an adjective. The verb "understand" is non-dynamic. "Each other" is a pronoun that deals with reciprocal action. In standard British English, can this ...
4
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1answer
1k views

sat or were sitting

Please have a look at this I stood in front of the living room, watching the movie unfold on the tv screen while my mom and sister - whose idea it was to watch the film in the first place - sat ...
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2answers
3k views

Using 'like' on a continuous tense

From the movie Misery: — You're being taken seriously. — I'm delighted the critics are liking it. Is the use of like correct in its continuous form? I know that state verbs are not normally used ...
0
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3answers
198 views

Progressive use of stative verbs [duplicate]

I was wondering if it would be possible to say: "I have been wanting to go to iceland now for more than 10 years!". given the fact that 'want' is a stative verb it is not common to use a progressive ...
2
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1answer
177 views

Use of “I'm loving”

The couple screenshots are taken from Riddick 2013: The two characters use "I'm loving", which I think is very informal. Does the present progressive tense convey any subtle nuances which the simple ...
4
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1answer
134 views

Use of stative verbs in the progressive tense to express relatively long-lasting situations

I've heard native speakers saying things like: I've been liking her/loving her/wanting to be with her for a long time now. They are having a bath. I'm wanting to go on vacation, but I don't have ...
2
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1answer
799 views

Is it allowed to use stative verbs in their progressive form?

"How are you feeling today?" "Are you seeing him?" "I'm feeling well." "The car is standing in the garage." Are those examples all grammatically false? If they are not, how can I ...
5
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1answer
615 views

Is this correct to say “You are having incorrect installer”?

Which one is correct to say? "You are having incorrect installer." or "You have incorrect installer."
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1answer
3k views

Adverb “now” in the present simple and the continuous

On the use of present simple and continuous, the business textbook I have (Market Leader) says the time expression "now" is used in the present continuous, but in the exercise below where "now" is ...
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1answer
1k views

usages of “would rather” and “would prefer”

1) I would prefer you did not mention it. 2) I would prefer you not to mention it. 3) I would rather you didn't mention it. 4) I would rather you not to mention it. Would you possibly ...
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8answers
101k views

You look good vs You are looking good

I have been told that 'you look good' is the perfect compliment to give. Because 'you are looking good' is not colloquial. How correct is it? For example, if I have to ask others about myself: How ...
5
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1answer
119 views

Is there a rule of thumb to distinguish stative verbs from nonstative ones?

Is there some rule of thumb to successfully distinguish stative verbs from nonstative ones?
3
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1answer
291 views

Is there any difference between these two sentences?

In what form should I put nonstative verbs with "when"? E.g., (1) You have to be careful when you cut a cake. (2) You have to be careful when you are cutting a cake. Is there a difference ...
2
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4answers
7k views

“I am not really liking it very much…” vs “I don't really like it very much…”

Could someone please tell me what is the difference between the two sentences below? 1 - I am not really liking it very much over there. 2 - I don't really like it very much over there.
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1answer
28k views

“I didn't know” or “I haven't known”?

Suppose that in a conversation, our conversational partner just said something completely new to us, and we want to express that we didn't know (or haven't known) about it before. For example, A: ...
3
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1answer
1k views

“is being on something”

The second sentence causes me problems. I have seen it somewhere. For me it looks like the verb to be is used twice (is / being). Is it grammatically correct? If yes, what does the second usage give ...
6
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1answer
82 views

Is “be” always stative?

Can I use the verb be in present perfect continuous tense or it is always stative? Are there any exceptions?
6
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1answer
2k views

Is the word “think” stative or dynamic?

When can I use present continuous for think?
5
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2answers
586 views

What is the proper use of the present progressive form, especially of “to have”?

When I read @ctype.h's question 'Is "I am having a code" grammatically correct?', I thought that @Mark Beadles brought up a good point: This is two questions, though you may not realize it. The ...
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2answers
5k views

Can you use “understand” in progressive constructions?

In an answer to a question asked today on EL&U (Antonyms of “lesser” and “greater”), I read the following sentence : "If I am understanding your question accurately" To my knowledge, the verb ...