Questions tagged [subject-complement]

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What kind of modifier are the two words “allurement and fulfillment” in the following extracted sentence?

It is a challenge and a wonder, an allurement and a fulfillment, which man can never escape but has to encounter. What type of modifier are these two words? Are they referring back to the pronoun ...
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1answer
39 views

subject complement with infinitive

This is a sentence in my grammar book. He was asked to write the letter. In the book it says : He = subject , was asked to write the letter = subject complement. The verb ask is a catenative verb....
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40 views

What “the thing” refer to in this context

“You've got to take the rest of your potion. Harry,” Mrs. Weasley said at last. Her hand nudged the sack of gold on his bedside cabinet as she reached for the bottle and the goblet. “You have a good ...
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1answer
35 views

subject vs subject-complement; inversion

Oxford Guide to English Grammar; John Eastwood; Oxford University Press 1994-09 Page 56 We can also sometimes put a complement in front position. They enjoyed the holiday. Best of all was the ...
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1answer
277 views

Subject complement “Noun phrase + Be + (to) bare infinitive”

Is it right to use a bare infinitive as a subject complement as in the following quote? "Its true purpose is convince shoppers that your product is the preferred choice" Another example: "Their ...
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1answer
19 views

subject in “participle phrase”

The quality of products can improve by using robots. In this sentence, what is the subject of "using"? I think it should rephrase The quality of products can be improved by using robots. Or ...
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1answer
124 views

Can we use an adjective to modify a verb?

'A confident person speaks a little stronger, stands a little taller, and looks a little bolder'. I read the sentence in the book Instant Voice Training. In this sentencen, both the verb speaks and ...
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1answer
415 views

What is the subject of this sentence to which the complement is related?

In this sentence, what is the subject to which the subject-complement is referring to? This instruction provides the rules for sharing information originated by the Purchasing Department. Are we ...
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1answer
181 views

I finished before he/him

I finished before he I finished before him In formal language, do we use the subject or object pronoun after before or after?
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2answers
239 views

Prepositional complement (two - part question)

In grammar, a subject complement follows a copular and describes the subject of a clause. Although nouns, pronouns and noun phrases most frequently perform the function, prepositional phrases can also ...
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1answer
90 views

Is the bold phrase an object complement?

I read the following paragraph from a book and I want to confirm whether the bold phrase is an object complement or a subject complement? Then The New York Times wrote an absolute rave review of ...
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2answers
2k views

Which of these sentences is correct: “Our topic for today is games.” or “Our topic for today is about games.”?

Which one is correct? Our topic for today is games. Our topic for today is about games.
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2answers
493 views

Why do we use subject pronouns in place of object pronouns?

Source Don't blame Gerard. It was I who woke you from a sound sleep. Don't get mad at me! I didn't pull your ponytail! It was he. Remember the amazing guitarist I met? This is she. How ...
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1answer
64 views

Singular or plural verb when subject is plural but subject complement is single?

Should the verb be singular or plural in this sentence: "The 1830s were a time" versus "The 1830s was a time"?
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2answers
324 views

Copula? Copula and Noun? I Feel Anger, I Feel Angry?

I feel anger. I feel angry. I’ve read some things about copulas. I don’t think I get meaning of adjective use after a copula. I don’t think I get how one can feel angry. I don’t think angry ...
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2answers
14k views

How “long gone” can be used in a sentence

"Long gone" is a phrase which means "gone a long time ago; used up a long time ago" according to this link. The following sentences are some samples of its usage: The ice cream and cake are long ...
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3answers
517 views

Relative Pronoun - Whom / Why is “Whom” used in this sentence?

If all these excuses are not enough, then I want to dedicate this book to the child whom this grown-up once was. This sentence is a part of the dedication of The Little Prince. As I know, relative ...
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1answer
69 views

is “which” a complement in “which she wanted to be”?

Her sister has become a lawyer, which she wanted to be. In the relative clause, "which she wanted to be", "which" serves as a complement. Is my understanding right? Thank you very much!