Questions tagged [subordinate-clauses]

A Subordinate Clause (or Dependent Clause) has a Subject and a Verb but cannot stand alone as a complete sentence.

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Isn't it confusing when there's a subordinate clause between a subject and a verb?

For example, The candidate, a political pundit the newspaper spoke to said, has a good potential to win the primary. What is interesting to me in English is that you don't flank subordinate ...
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Non-essential clause position

Grammarly’s digital writing assistant helps over 20 million people write more clearly and effectively every day, across multiple platforms and devices. Can I write like this instead? What is the ...
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“Present” vs “future tense” in subordinate clauses in this context

A conversation between two friends: A: When will you come to our house. B: I will go when my mother goes / when my mother will go. I know that we are supposed to use only the present tense in ...
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A sentence has two verbs

Sentence: What's it mean that the review is now a criminal probe? The sentence has two verbs, the is in What's and mean. Is this right? Why can it be written this way? Source: "News Brief: DOJ ...
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Is the comma in this context grammatical

Russian military officers hacked Democratic servers to steal thousands of emails in 2016, the intelligence community and the special counsel found. Is the comma above grammatical? I think it isn't ...
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32 views

Subjunctive mood in the dependent clause

I am wondering whether I should use subjunctive mood in the dependent clause in the following example. Is there a rule for sentences like this? Or they just have different meanings? Example: There ...
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Is the following sentence grammatically incorrect and is it used colloquially?

(1) I don't know what graph theory is. According to the grammar, I believe it should be: (2) I don't know what is graph theory. But is it spoken colloquially the way I wrote it in (1)? Grammar ...
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Use of pronoun in second clause of relative clause

Which of these sentence is correct in the term of it used below sentence: The book that your father brought from India yesterday your elder brother has brought it in my school today. The book ...
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The change of the tense in the main and the subordinate clauses

I have found the two sentences in Michael Swan's Practical English Usage .(page no 556) 1.This discovery means that we will have to spend less on food. 2 This Discovery will mean that we spend ...
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133 views

Are they two subordinate clauses?

Consider the following sentence I got from github tutorial. If you’ve made a change that you feel would benefit the community as a whole, you should definitely consider contributing back. The part ...
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Adjectival clause construction

My brother brought the bread from India that you have eaten. You have eaten the bread that my brother brought from India. Is the that antecedent of the bread above in both sentence or there ...
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205 views

Usage of “How can we” and “How we can” in the following case

Correct This is how we can improve XXX. Correct How can we improve XXX? May I know, which is the correct form? Would you mind telling us how we can improve XXX? Would you mind telling us how can ...
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Is there any difference in meaning between “how” and “what” when each is used to start a subordinate clause?

Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence? Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat ...
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Singular–plural choices in subject+verb agreement, notional agreement, and pronouns with ambiguous antecedents

The original version of a particular sentence: EWB is a group of engineers that, unlike many engineering corporations, assist people around the world by applying its knowledge to solve problems in ...
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What does “to shout over” mean, particularly as it has been used in a particular passage I’ve read with curious sytnax?

I don’t un­der­stand the mean­ing of shout over as it has been used in the fol­low­ing pas­sage from Pa­tri­cia High­smith’s novel, The Ta­lented Mr. Ri­p­ley: A well-dressed Ital­ian greeted ...
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Permission is required + infinitive clause

Is there a correct and natural way to construct a sentence starting by "Permission is required" that contains both the action that requires permission and the person who would do the action. For ...
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Order of sentence clauses

I will take the book from your home that your father got from India. I will take the book that your father got from India from your home. How to best write such sentence?
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Explain 3rd conditional complex sentence

Could you explain to me the bolded part of the sentence? Why do we use this tense/form? Is it correct? If he had known that it would have upset you, he would have been more careful. I ...
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What does “self temporarily” mean?

This is the whole paragraph I’m having trouble with: His uncle backhanded him so hard across his left cheek that Isaac’s sense of self temporarily broke upon the ground on which his body fell. ...
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The second type of conditional clause (the type contradictory to a current fact)

I have a question in regard to the second type of conditional (the type contradictory to a current fact). I know that the clause should be in past tense, but if there's an adjective clause, should it ...
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62 views

Coordinating conjunctions to connect multiple subordinate clauses

Coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, nor, or, so, yet) can connect main sentences, words, phrases and many others, but can they connect multiple subordinate clauses? If yes, how should I ...
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Commas around introductory phrase which is part of subordinate clause

Example sentence: The army was barely ready when, in February 1794, the war broke out. Are the commas around "in February 1794" correct? Could I leave them out? Or should I rather move "in ...
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“Who” or “Whom” someone was speaking to?

Cinder How easy it was to forget who she was speaking to, She was speaking to someone. I think it shuold be "whom".
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Is it correct to use Past Continuous with 'since' adverbial clause?

For example: "Since I done my first homework, I was doing my second homework" I've seen plenty of examples on English learner's sites demonstrating either Past Simple or Present Perfect as the main ...
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Is the following sentence grammatically correct? — “The only problem is where do we start looking?”

I just came across the sentence given above in the question, and think that it isn't grammatically correct such that the correct one would have to be as follows; The only problem is where we start ...
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Catenative Clause and Canonical Clause

Consider the following sentence - She was working. [Function] Subject: She [Category: Noun Phrase] and [Function] Predicate: was working [Category: Verb Phrase] Now consider the verb phrase - ...
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Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

I am reading Cambridge Grammar of English Language (CaGEL) all over again, though not cover to cover. One page no. 215, I came across The major functions in the structure of the clause are the ...
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How to understand “who as a Squib could no more have Stunned the fireworks than swallowed them”

"Don't Stun them, Filch!" shouted Umbridge angrily, for all the world as though it had been his incantation. "Right you are, Headmistress!" wheezed Filch, who as a Squib could no more have ...
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Such As vs Such that vs Such who

He is such a boy as doesnot help anybody. Vs He is such a boy that doesnot help anybody. Vs He is such a boy who doesnt help anybody. Which one is correct among the above three? Explain the meaning ...
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What clause is the sentence in the following paragraph?

We all have ways of showing our sweetie how much we love them. But celebrity relationship expert, Kailen Rosenberg, shares why it’s so important and has tips, that’ll really show them how much, ...
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79 views

Wh-clause: what even you must condemn

I saw the following sentence in a dictionary. I'd like to know whether it is correct and what relationship holds between "what even you must condemn" and "he was lying." But, what even you must ...
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156 views

Can an optative clause ever be used as a subordinate clause?

In English, there are five different types of finite clauses: declarative, interrogative, imperative, exclamative, and optative Here are examples: (1) You are generous. [declarative] (2) ...
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“which…come from” VS “where… come” [closed]

let's talk about the country where you come from. let's talk about the country where you come. let's talk about the country which you come from. I am not certain which one is right.
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What clause element is this please?

When she got into the car at five, ready for the fifteen-mile drive across London, it wouldn't start. What does this stretch of language represent? Is it an adverbial?
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What is the meaning of the answer “I suppose so.” to the question “You won't be here tomorrow?”?

The following is an example from Swan's Practical English Usage (515.2) You won't be here tomorrow? I don't suppose so. I understand the answer "I don't suppose so" is the same as I don't ...
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96 views

How to identify a matrix clause (a clause with an embedded subordinate clause)?

I am trying to understand matrix clauses. Today at the lecture, two sentences were discussed, of which one contains a matrix clause and one does not. I'm going to post them here: He knew ...
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“I'll never pray to a God since my butt issues”

I'll never pray to a God since my butt issues. The usage of 'since' drew my attention and puzzled me. I don't understand why it was used here and whether it was a substitute for either 'because of'...
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119 views

What's the difference between finite clause and infinite clause?

What does infinite clause mean and which features differentiate it from finite clause? I know so far that finite clause is inflectable while infinite clause is uninflectable. But I need some examples ...
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What are these structures called and how do they differ?

A long serving member of the Army, he recieved many decorations including The George Cross, the most fitting conclusion to his distinguished career. People often pass away because they've simply '...
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Can we add the phrase “do you think” in an interrogative sentence and not reverse the subject-verb order?

I was chatting with my friend and I asked him this question. But, then I was not sure if it was grammatically correct because I had never used the phrase "do you think" with an interrogative sentence. ...
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420 views

Is the sentence 'What I need is to do/doing the things I like.' grammatically correct?

There is a task in Oxford English Grammar (Basic) by Michael Swan and Catherine Walter that goes as follows: Write a sentence beginning 'What I need is...' Which made me think of which is more ...
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What's the use of “that” in this case?

What's the difference between the two? You know that it is true. You know it is true. Are those the same perfectly in conversation?
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Can a dependent clause specify a verb phrase?

I am not sure if "specify" is the right word here, so please edit it if there is a more suitable expression. So I know that noun phrases can be "specified" by dependent clauses, like this, The ...
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“to first receive” or “to receive first”

I have received an email asking me whether I would like to extend a support period, but I need to know another information beforehand (I have already asked but never received an answer). Where ...
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Locating the main verb of a subordinate that-clause

In this CNN report starting at 2:58, a British reporter says: Trump is so deeply unpopular that her sort of gilded way of smiling in his presence, never really causing a standoff, and managing to ...
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858 views

suggests that she sit /sits/sat

I have a question about "The verbs with the general meaning of suggestion and form of verbs" a) She declined a seat beside Charles on the sofa. She insisted that Jane sit there. (subjunctive verb) ...
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180 views

Do the sentences bear the same meaning?

I was wondering whether: a. the two sentences mean the same, and b. if sentences of the same construction can always convert the verb to a participle. Here are the sentences: Though it ...
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“How many language do you speak?” OR “How many language you speak?”

How many language do you speak? OR How many language you speak? Which one is correct? What is the difference? I have found another example: How much food are you going to take with ...
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Subordinate clause within a sentence

I'm always confused with this type of clause - I wake up feeling tired, I went home trying to sleep etc. I am always confused when and how to use this type of clause (please correct me and let me ...
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The plan that I want to give [to] you. Direct, Indirect object in attributive clause

I don't know the grammar rule I must apply in the following sentences. Do I need to add to? Here is the book that I want to give [to] you. Here is the plan that I want to give [to] you. Here is the ...