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Questions tagged [synonyms]

A synonym is a word that means exactly, or nearly the same thing, as another word.

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111 votes
8 answers
151k views

Is there any difference between being ill and sick?

I can say I'm ill or I'm sick. But what is the difference between the usage of these terms? I've heard that one can use sick for longer-term and ill for shorter-term, but is that really correct? How ...
Cjxcz Odjcayrwl's user avatar
47 votes
6 answers
14k views

Does the English language have a word explaining a song in your head that you can't stop singing?

Sometimes after listening to a popular song you can't stop repeating it in your head. Is there any term for this in English? You can't say the same in Russian using one word.
Maryia Beliankova  's user avatar
45 votes
2 answers
387k views

Photo Vs. Picture Vs. Image : What is the difference between them?

Sometimes I hear people say 'Photos' and some time I hear them say 'Pictures'. In addition, I sometimes encounter the word 'Image'. In my understanding I feel that all of them are the same but I'm not ...
miami's user avatar
  • 633
37 votes
3 answers
204k views

Differences between "mandatory" and "compulsory"

What is the difference between mandatory and compulsory? Are they synonyms? Can they be used interchangeably especially with regard to something you must do? Writing the essay is a mandatory task. ...
haunted85's user avatar
  • 1,029
25 votes
2 answers
91k views

Difference between logoff, logout, signoff and signout

Is there any serious difference between logoff, logout, signoff and signout? Websites seem to use the phrases interchangeably. Is this just a difference is style, or have they made a deliberate ...
jsj's user avatar
  • 885
25 votes
2 answers
31k views

"Pretty" versus "quite" [duplicate]

Is there any difference between using pretty, and quite, in the following sentences? I am pretty good at playing soccer. I am quite good at playing soccer. How are you? I am quite well. ...
apaderno's user avatar
  • 20.9k
24 votes
2 answers
2k views

Any chances "spell" means "pronounce"?

Inspired by this question of mine and that @BenKovitz suggested that I should ask a new question, I attempt to do so. Here goes: The Persian Wikipedia (Persian: ویکی‌پدیا، دانشنامهٔ آزاد‎ Vikipedia,...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
  • 7,351
24 votes
4 answers
6k views

Difference between "ignite" and "kindle"

Can't grasp the difference and the use cases of these 2 words. They both seem to mean something close to "set on fire", but what is the exact meaning, and are their use cases the same? Can one ignite ...
YB_Evil's user avatar
  • 383
22 votes
10 answers
10k views

Wealthy and Rich, what's the difference

Is there any difference between someone being wealthy and someone being rich? For instance, is Bill Gates rich or wealthy? Or maybe he is both. I don't get the subtle difference if any.
Jonathan de M.'s user avatar
22 votes
1 answer
26k views

What is the difference between "look", "see", and "watch"?

When should I use "look", "see", and "watch"? I'm watching "Star Trek". Have you seen "Star Trek"? Are the examples above correct?
Be Brave Be Like Ukraine's user avatar
19 votes
7 answers
6k views

Are "concur" and "agree" exact synonyms?

I was talking to a friend and he said something I agreed with so much I said the common phrase: I couldn't agree more except, I said "concur" instead of agree because we were using Skype, and back ...
Marvin's user avatar
  • 498
19 votes
4 answers
4k views

How often do native speakers use the word "to scathe"? Is it OK if I use it instead of "to injure"?

The word "to scathe" is the synonym of the word "to harm" or "to injure". However, I have never noticed how somebody uses it. Is it OK to occasionally use it instead of &...
Choro's user avatar
  • 201
15 votes
2 answers
30k views

"Be yet to do" vs "have yet to do"

This theory has yet to be proven. This theory is yet to be proven. This is yet to be done. This has yet to be done. I have yet to spend summer in the mountains. I am yet to spend summer in the ...
user1677's user avatar
  • 463
14 votes
8 answers
5k views

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Is there an introductory word or phrase which means considering what was said? German-made parts are way too expensive. Taking it into consideration, we ordered Chinese ones.
olegst's user avatar
  • 1,254
14 votes
2 answers
354k views

Difference between "assist in" and "assist with"

He assisted in the editing of the movie. He assisted with the editing of the movie. He assisted at the editing of the movie. Is "assist in" the same as "assist with"? Can I always ...
Stefan van den Akker's user avatar
13 votes
4 answers
27k views

The word "joint" as a synonym for place?

I'd like to know in what context can the word "joint" be used as a synonym for place. Is it used for places that sell products and/or services?
ethmz's user avatar
  • 233
13 votes
3 answers
11k views

"realization" vs "implementation" of a computer program

Can realization be used to refer to the implementation of a computer program? As in: We will realize the program next week. or Listing X demonstrates a possible realization. I was pretty ...
joergl's user avatar
  • 265
13 votes
4 answers
73k views

What is difference between "accomplishment" and "achievement"

It seems that in my native language is used only one word for translating both words "accomplishment" and "achievement". Are they synonyms? Are there some difference in usage of these words?
Alexander Myshov's user avatar
12 votes
6 answers
44k views

Difference between "as" and "because"?

What is the difference between as and because? Which one of these sentences is correct? He stayed home from work as he was sick? He stayed home form work because he was sick? Which is correct? Are ...
Артем Иванов's user avatar
12 votes
6 answers
29k views

Difference between (diverse / various / different / distinct / disparate)

Consider: A person of diverse interests can talk on many subjects. We have looked at various houses, but have decided to buy this one. The department store sells many different things. The criminal ...
Kinzle B's user avatar
  • 7,105
11 votes
5 answers
15k views

What is the difference between "job" and "job opportunity"?

Currently, I am looking for a job. Or am I looking for a job opportunity? Or is the hiring company having a job opportunity for people like me? Can I use "I am looking for a job/job opportunity" ...
Stefan van den Akker's user avatar
11 votes
5 answers
184k views

Difference between "much, many, a lot of and lots of"

Difference between "much, many, a lot of and lots of" What is the difference between them? Are they synonyms or not?
Ice Girl's user avatar
  • 4,267
11 votes
2 answers
12k views

When can we use the words "presume" and "assume"?

According to Merriam-Webster, presume means to expect or assume especially with confidence to suppose to be true without proof while assume means to pretend to have or be to take as granted or ...
Jaeger Jay's user avatar
10 votes
5 answers
5k views

The right way to say "unload someone"

Is there any common word or expression for saying "to unload worker"? It doesn't matter what kind of workers they are - the point is - what's the right word for how to say "take some scope of work off ...
V. Rogov's user avatar
  • 717
10 votes
9 answers
25k views

What is the right word to describe something more than "great"

I need to write short email that will state something like: ..that will turn a good company into a ... company. What would be a proper word that I can use?
mql4beginner's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
4k views

If something happened again, did it recur or reoccur?

This video (from 8 min.53 sec.) shows that the verb recur is often pronounced as reoccur, and the host of the show explains this as a case of a mispronunciation: there's no such word as "reoccur" and ...
Victor B.'s user avatar
  • 9,545
10 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the difference between "jarring" and "grating" when we refer to sounds?

Definition of jarring incongruous in a striking or shocking way; clashing:the telephone struck a jarring note in those Renaissance surroundings grating sounding harsh and unpleasant:her high, ...
Bogdan Lataianu's user avatar
9 votes
4 answers
3k views

Is "obey" a stronger word than "observe" in the following sentence?

In a film from an English teaching youtube channel at 5:40 around, the female teacher is expressing that using "obey" instead of "observe" is a little too odd and strong in the ...
questionguy's user avatar
9 votes
5 answers
1k views

What could be a nice word to use in the title of my presentation slide which represents failures?

Background: I have done a scientific project as a part of my graduation program and now I want to present my work through presentation slides. There were some techniques which didn't work and meant I ...
skm's user avatar
  • 193
9 votes
5 answers
52k views

What is the difference between "packing" and packaging"?

I think this is a simple question, but it confuses me when I am creating sentences. I make a few searches on Google and find out that the words are not synonymous. But in what context I will use "...
humungs's user avatar
  • 286
9 votes
1 answer
1k views

What do you see if you enter 'clip' in the Windows 10 Search Box or Cortana?

I thought I made a mistake and inputed the word 'clip' in the search box and I saw that I hit the snipping tool which was really what I wanted. But the question arises: Are clip and snip in this ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,521
9 votes
5 answers
48k views

The difference between "prevent" and "avoid"

The accident could have been prevented The accident could have been avoided Would you show me semantically what the difference between the two is? Also, are there any scenarios in which both ...
nima's user avatar
  • 5,837
9 votes
1 answer
95k views

What is the difference between "it seems" and "it looks like"?

Many times while I talked to others or wrote some text messages I got confusion about which phrase I should use to express the actual meaning of the words It seems . . . and It looks like . ....
Ram_HW's user avatar
  • 251
8 votes
4 answers
3k views

Is there any difference between humblebrag and false modesty?

I wonder whether there exists any difference between humblebrag and false modesty. E.g., is false modesty more general than humblebrag, or are the two expressions synonymous?
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
13k views

'Section' vs 'segment' vs 'part'

The following examples are taken from OALD: That section of the road is still closed. The library has a large biology section. the tail section of the plane I wonder if I can substitute segment or ...
Kinzle B's user avatar
  • 7,105
7 votes
2 answers
4k views

“I hope he visit us more often” Why is this wrong?

I desire he visit us more often. This is correct, right? I hope he visit us more often. Why is this incorrect? Why should I use “visits” instead?
Yamacure's user avatar
  • 228
7 votes
4 answers
11k views

Wage vs. salary

Is there any difference between the meaning of the words salary and wage? I have played with both on Google Translate: for some languages they have the different translations but for others they ...
talles's user avatar
  • 1,271
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

What are the differences between "receptacle" and "container"?

Generally, both "receptacle" and "container" refer to an object that contains some other object(s). What are the differences between these two words? Do they differ in meaning, usage, or origin? I ...
Cosmos Gu's user avatar
  • 171
7 votes
3 answers
655 views

Are "stress" and "distress" interchangable?

Are the words distress, and stress interchangeable? I have heard them used in the same place, but are they the same? He was very (stressed/distressed) about his co-workers thoughts of his idea.
Mark Robinson's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
5k views

Word for unused in a while?

I'm looking for a word which can fit the gap in the sentence: "My french is a little bit ______ since I haven't used it in a while" I came up with poor but hopefully there's a more appropriate word.
Trey's user avatar
  • 425
6 votes
2 answers
3k views

Are "I have no idea" and "I have no ideas" both correct, and if so, are they synonymous?

I am considering these two sentences: I have no idea. I have no ideas. Are they both correct, and if so, are they synonymous?
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
170 views

What is the word that is synonym to "right", and sounds like "rido"?

There's a word that sounds similar to rido and means right, as in correct. I've heard it in a movie. What is it?
Eric's user avatar
  • 179
6 votes
4 answers
4k views

"citation" vs. "quote"

The two word families "quote", "to quote" and "citation", "to cite" seem to be synonyms to me as a German native speaker, if we look at their meaning to reproduce information somebody else published. ...
Byte Commander's user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
3k views

Furniture as a general term for curtain accessories

Can the word "furniture" be used as a general term for accessories and fittings, for example, curtain accessories (hooks, brackets, rings)? Furniture: the small accessories or fittings that are ...
Yulia's user avatar
  • 2,850
6 votes
4 answers
1k views

"Manager" or "supervisor" when complaining about service?

If you're in a store or restaurant and dissatisfied with the work of an employee and want to complain, how will you say: Call your supervisor! or Call your manager! or some other way?
olegst's user avatar
  • 1,254
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is "the same" always with "the", but "identical" without it?

As far as I know, “same” and “identical” have identical meaning. Why is one used with “the” and one without “the”? I can argue that “same” should always have “the”: When thing 2 is the same as thing 1,...
matj1's user avatar
  • 135
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

What exactly does "due" mean in the expression "with all due respect"?

What are the synonyms for "due" in the following sentence? Definition: with (all) due respect: (spoken) used when you disagree with someone or criticize them in a polite way: Dad, with all ...
Mohammad Afrashteh's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

More polite forms of "you"

In French, "vous" can be used instead of "toi" for this purpose. A seemingly rude example in English is when someone wants to instruct a lawyer, and writes 'I would like to instruct you.' I recognise ...
user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
557 views

What are synonyms of 'circus' that I can use in this context?

When I came back from work, I noticed that there were tons of people gathered around in the corridor. There was so much noise and hustle and bustle, it felt like a circus. Is circus an appropriate ...
Max's user avatar
  • 8,682
6 votes
2 answers
365 views

Is there another word for “deported person”?

I am looking for another word for deported person, or a short form of saying it.
niclas's user avatar
  • 171

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