Questions tagged [syntax]

This tag is for questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Sentences without subjects and objects

I believe that a sentence in English must have a subject. (It does not necessarily have an object as for intransitive verbs.) A sentence without a subject is also possible as in an imperative sentence....
2
votes
1answer
39 views

Man, it's not easy to decide

I'd love to hear your opinions. Please tell me which one is correct or incorrect. the original sentence: You all must have played this game at least once. You don't have to take specific context into ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

How can you parse the syntax of the sentence?

The sentence I need to parse: "Had" is the Past Tense of the verb to "have". I can see that "Had" is the subject. But what part of the sentence is the predicate? Am I right thinking that "Past" ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Elliptical structured confusing English

1.She believed to have been killed in somewhere in frontline For me it should be written in like "She is believed 'who' have been killed in somewhere in frontline" After the peace treaty ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Which of the following is correct and what is the difference in meaning among them?

Could someone please help me with the following sentences? Which ones are correct and why and what is the difference in meaning among them? 1) I'm amazed how can he be so insensitive? 2) I'm amazed ...
4
votes
1answer
53 views

Use of “that” or “the” with the title “option A”

Context: I volunteer with a student who is taking the CELPIP exam in Canada. In this exam they give a survey with two options (option A and option B). The student has to choose an option and say why ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

“write using a black pen” Is the usage correct?

Hi. I have a question regarding the following two sentences: A: Please write using a black pen when providing further information under this section. B: Please review the document using the latest ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Constituency tests — is a phrase like this a constituent?

When we have a sentence with a strange syntactic position, how do we know if a phrase is a constituent? For example, "The two shortest of the books" Is [of the books] a constituent? I tried ...
0
votes
0answers
101 views

Specifier, adjunct, or complement? how to know? syntax

How can I know if an embedded clause is a Specifier, an adjunct, or a complement? For example, in a sentence like: One notion that nobody has mentioned yet was proposed during the conference. Can ...
0
votes
1answer
21 views

“4 hours each session” or “each session will last for 4 hours”

Which one is clearer and grammatically correct? The course will commence on December 2 every Mondays and Wednesday, 4 hours each session, for 4 weeks The course will be scheduled every Mondays ...
0
votes
2answers
68 views

He left her a widow

He left her a widow. I think this sentence is ambiguous. The possible meanings are: 1. He died and she became a widow. 2. He kept a widow in her care. Could you please analyze the sentences and ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

You must have mended your shoes

Your shoes are shining: You must have mended your shoes. You must have your shoes mended. This was the question given in an examination. Most students and some teachers found the ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Not all language tests are of the same kind

Not all language tests are of the same kind. All language tests are not of the same kind I think both the sentences mean the same thing though they are syntactically different. What is the part ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Identifying parts of a sentence

I just answered a question on stack overflow : https://stackoverflow.com/questions/57920126/how-to-make-sense-of-this-scala-stacktrace/57920452#57920452 In my answer, I used the terms "subject verb ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

John could drive the car

John could drive the car. The car could be driven by John The second sentence is the passive form of the first sentence. But I have read in a book for teaching methodology that the two sentences ...
1
vote
2answers
21 views

Is 'pair of dress' more correct than 'dress'? [closed]

Is 'pair of dress' more correct than 'dress'? Is it syntactically correct if I say 'I donated 20 pairs of dresses'?
2
votes
2answers
130 views

Is a subject required for a grammatically correct sentence?

In particular I'm interested in the sentence: Meet with friends and family. It is a sentence in the 'interests and hobbies' section of a resume, so it can be deduced who the subject is. Is the ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

The Passive Auxillary

The company is being taxed The company has been taxed The company has been being taxed These are three examples listed in a book on syntax. In the first one, the book suggests that "is" is ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

Using singular vs. plural objects in a prepositional phrase

What are the grammatical differences between: He's good at driving cars. and: He's good at driving a car. Are there any differences in correctness or meaning, or times when you should use one ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

How to use “there is” after “there is no reason for”?

Consider the sentence: There is nothing after the credits. How do I add that after "There is no reason for"? There is no reason for there being anything after the credits. There is no ...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Shouldn’t “if pleasure be happiness” be written “if pleasure would be happiness”?

Why is there a simple form “be” after the subject in the following sentence? Isn't it that it should be like 'if pleasure would be happiness'? My courtiers called me the Happy Prince, and happy ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Sentence structure in interrogative sentences

Which of the following sentence structure is correct? (1)Do you know where I can find some shoes? (2) Do you know where can I find some shoes?
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Help understanding the structure of this sentence (Typical orienting reactions include *the following the arteries* to the brain…)

Typical orienting reactions include the following the arteries to the brain grow wider allowing more blood to reach it, the heart slows down and arteries to the large muscles become narrower so as to ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

I feel a line of an article somewhat strange gramatically

I am currently reading this article, which has the below line, The outcome also reflects the seismic effect the U.K.'s decision three years ago to leave the 28-nation EU has had on the country's ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Syntax operations. What are the operations involved in the pair here?

What are the syntactic operations are involved in the following pair? IT was: she talked with him via email? IT became: With whom did she talk via email? syntax My book shows that ...
2
votes
1answer
328 views

In syntax, why cannot we say things like “he took walked at the park”? but can say “he took a walk at the park”?

In syntax, why cannot we say things like "he took walked at the park"? but can say things like "he took a walk at the park"?
0
votes
2answers
30 views

wash the dishes ; a phrase?

I don't know either the following constructions are a phrase or a clause? 1) wash the dishes 2) do the laundry 3) take out the garbage In my opinion, they are all phrases or verb phrases ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Is over here/ over there preposition?

I wonder if my knowledge is right regarding the following phrases being prepositions: i) over here ii) over there Both having the same construction= over (preposition) + here/there (adverb) ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Syntax of a clause in Wikipedia's entry on “Irish Bulls”

What's the syntax of the clause in bold? Extensive use of Irish bulls are made of by American Jewish humorists, from the period when large numbers of recent Jewish immigrants from Germany or ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

What does “to shout over” mean, particularly as it has been used in a particular passage I’ve read with curious sytnax?

I don’t un­der­stand the mean­ing of shout over as it has been used in the fol­low­ing pas­sage from Pa­tri­cia High­smith’s novel, The Ta­lented Mr. Ri­p­ley: A well-dressed Ital­ian greeted ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

A question regarding the verb — would like+ to-infinitive

I appreciate if someone can help me in clarifying my doubt. I(subj) + would (modal verb)+ like(verb) + to eat (main verb (to-infinitive))+ rice (obj) Are the classes correct? Thanks!
0
votes
1answer
41 views

The subject in “How much information is created daily?”

How much information is created daily? If the subject is only implied in this sentence, why do we need the auxiliary verb (is) in this sentence?
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Which sentence structure is correct/better and why? Please explain

I have applied for admission to post-graduation course at a few universities. I have applied at a few universities for admission in post-graduation course.
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Is it correct that we use “be” instead of “do” after “would”?

for example in the following sentence she can not do any useful thing. She wouldn’t be any help, would she? Is it true that we can not use "do" after "would"?
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Grammar of the Openings in Fairy Tales [duplicate]

Which is better in terms of grammar and why, I wonder? Once upon a time lived King and Queen... Once upon a time there lived King and Queen...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

to watch me play - what rules are here

Here is an excerpt from The Art of Learning: More and more fans came to my tournaments to watch me play and get autographs. My questions is should not it be: either More and more fans came to my ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

Not repeating the negation for the second clause

On world building meta I came across this sentence: Now I truly believe that those that ask in this manner are not actually lazy and just expect us to do their work for them. How is this sentence ...
0
votes
2answers
29 views

Syntax of “There they all were, talking about homework and Quidditch and who knew what other rubbish”

Hermione ripped open the newspaper and began to read the report inside while Harry looked around the Great Hall. He could not understand why his fellow students were not looking scared or at least ...
4
votes
1answer
157 views

The meaning of the “at the of”

In the following article by The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/2387900/New-man-at-the-of-IMG.html I stumbled upon the following phrase (in the title of the article): "New man at the of ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Subject complement or prepositonal object

In this sentence: " This is an adventure to me" /an adventure to me/ is the subject complement. I'd like to know the function of " to me" . Is it a post modifier of " adventure"? Or is it a prep. ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

What structure is that - “They are getting more and more applicants wanting to join them”

In this structure: "They are getting more and more applicants wanting to join them". What is that? Is it the participle? Is it the "get sb doing" clause?
0
votes
2answers
74 views

The grammar of “be buried”

What is the grammar of "be buried" in the following sentences?: The graves have all been found under the houses, right under the floors. And it may be this burial custom that explains why the ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

The relation between direct and indirect speech

‘Mary, I want to take you out to dinner,’ he had lied, to break the frost. I would like to know what is the syntactic relation between the direct and indirect speech - whether there is any kind of ...
0
votes
1answer
551 views

What is name of structure Being + v3

I went to the hospital and I saw a patient being treated last night. What kind of sentence it is being treated in the above sentence.
2
votes
2answers
40 views

Have got usage question

Consider this: We have got to go back - Luke Skywalker in Star Wars V I don't think it is actually present perfect usage but certainly used like that syntactically. It is more like simple ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

How can I formulate this sentences correctly?

How can I formulate this sentences correct? Singular We do have an employee which is call John Doe. We do have an employee which is called John Doe. Plural We do have employees, ...
4
votes
2answers
69 views

The grammar of “struck dumb, sprouting feelers” in this sentence

Harry was pointing the wand directly at Dudley's heart. Harry could feel fourteen years’ hatred of Dudley pounding in his veins—what wouldn't he give to strike now, to jinx Dudley so thoroughly he'd ...
1
vote
3answers
98 views

What clause element is this please?

When she got into the car at five, ready for the fifteen-mile drive across London, it wouldn't start. What does this stretch of language represent? Is it an adverbial?
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Can somebody explain the grammar of this sentence?

"Looking at the first and second stages of the process, there are three ways of collecting data." I saw this sentence in an IELTS diagram report but im not sure of the grammar. Do we have a reduced ...
4
votes
2answers
482 views

How to understand “…you like it the shape it is”

Fred and George looked at each other. Then Fred said abruptly, “I've told you before, Ron, keep your nose out if you like it the shape it is. Can't see why you would, but -” I don't know how to ...