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For questions about expressing time in English.

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1answer
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Is the turn of speech “stand: September 16, 2018” correct?

I'm writing on my website: This German / English Word List in Excel contains 1593 German words. If you need more words, you can have my German-English word list with 27449 words (stand: September ...
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1answer
39 views

she was happy to see her mother

a. She was happy to see her mother. Does this mean a1. She was happy when she saw her mother. a2. She was happy that she'd seen her mother. a3. She was happy that she was going to see her mother. ...
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2answers
86 views

Why is it “half an hour” instead of “a half hour”?

Today our lecturer said that we were gonna have "half an hour" break. Initially I thought it's a mistake and it should be "a half hour" but latter I was told that it's correct. Assuming that it's ...
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3answers
46 views

If “I read the book in five minutes” is to duration, what is “I read the book five minutes ago?”

If duration is the general term for the class of words that reference the time difference between now and the future when an event is finished (i.e. I read the book in five minutes), what is the ...
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2answers
48 views

Past Progressive and Simple Past with the Time Clause (While)

While he was taking a shower, his dogs were eating his steaks. (That is the correct sentence according to the website that I visited.) We use the past progressive with the past progressive to show ...
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3answers
20 views

“looking back from now”: is it looking back from the future to now or looking back to the past from this moment?

original sentence (1999 China's post-grad entrance exam): People looking back 5 or 10 years from now may well wonder why so few companies took the online plunge. http://www.langlib.com/Reading/...
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3answers
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First class(one week ago),Second class(yesterday),Third class(now;at the present time) how can we mention the first class?

First class ( one week days ago ) Second class ( yesterday ) Third class ( now ; at the present time ) We can mention the second class by saying " last session " but how can we mention the first ...
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0answers
51 views

“At what time” Vs. “What time”

When asking about something that will be later I have two ways to ask it: At what time is the lecture today? At what time you will come tomorrow? or What time is the lecture today? What time ...
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1answer
21 views

Until an hour latar, until a year later, until next year?

I am struggling a bit with expressions determining points in time and duration. Could you please explain to me whether I got it right? I am using "until" on purpose, I do know I could say it in a ...
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1answer
48 views

Does “all-month” mean “from month to month”?

There is all-day, but I'm not sure whether all-month exists or means "from month to month" or not. I can use month to month too, but all-month seems more suited in this writing: No parenting book ...
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3answers
29 views

How to say “many hours before something” in simpler words and make it sound less formal?

They let me check in many hours before the official checkin time. This phrase sounds a bit formal to me. I'd like to simplify it, but the only other option that comes to my mind is "long before". ...
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2answers
44 views

Can we said “last morning”?

Normally we'll use last night when we're talking about yesterday's night, but how about yesterday's morning? Why can't we use last morning so as afternoon? Just like last weekend, last Friday, last ...
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1answer
32 views

How should I write about done tasks?

When I finish my work, I need to write a simple report about completed tasks. What time should I use? Now my report usually looks like: Fix bag with this Update that Clean up Should I use past ...
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1answer
111 views

Why is “I've read this book for two hours” wrong?

A grammar book that I've been using showed this sentence as incorrect. I've read this book for two hours. This sentence is apparently incorrect in present perfect. Why is this sentence wrong? If ...
0
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1answer
59 views

Is “I play tennis for thirty minutes every Monday.” a correct sentence?

I play tennis for thirty minutes every Monday. I spend thirty minutes playing tennis every Monday. Which one is correct and more natural? An English teacher had her students make a weekly exercise ...
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1answer
24 views

Placement of a year in mid-sentence [closed]

Can I use 2017 in the middle of the sentence? For example: The platform was launched in 2017, with an extensive support of our venture fund.
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1answer
43 views

“Heard from” with various recent-past phrases [closed]

Have you heard from John... a. recently b. two days ago c. since two days d. for two days What is the best answer? Since recently and for two days can use in the present perfect tense
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1answer
51 views

Should I put an article before “half” when talking about time? [duplicate]

I know that in context of time, if for example it is: 1:45 then I should say: "It is a quarter to two". But my question is about "half" in such context, for example, in case of 1:30. Should I say "It ...
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1answer
22 views

Correct way of indicating period of time on this sentence

Between the sentences: You've only been a day there. You've only been there for a day. Which would the grammatically correct one, or both are correct? Thank you
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2answers
305 views

Should days of week be in plural form?

Are these sentences natural? Members of my family have their weddings on Saturdays. Pete pays a visit to his grandmother once a month. He does it on Saturdays. I celebrate my birthday on ...
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1answer
1k views

Future tense - I would be available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April

Is this sentence grammatically correct? I will be available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April. or I am available anytime until 12pm or after 8pm from 2nd of April.
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10answers
10k views

Can any time on clock be spoken as it is in numbers only (hour + minutes)?

According to the Cambridge dictionary, the answer for “What time is it?” depends on the minutes. When the times outside five-minute intervals, we say minutes past or minutes to: 9.01 one ...
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1answer
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How to say this time 00:00 in words in English?

How should I say this time: 00:00 in words? For example if someone asks me about the exact time and I would like to answer him exactly what I see in my watch [00:00 or 00:01]. Let's suppose that I ...
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2answers
50 views

Is the time X:30 said as “half past X” or “half to X”?

Is the time X:30 should be said only as "half past X" or it is possible also to say "half to X"? For example: It is 4:30 AM. It is "half past four" or also "half to five"?
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1answer
24 views

How should I say this hour in words: “03:01:00”?

How should I say this hour in words: "03:01:00"? It's three and one minute o'clock. It's three and one minute. Or the word "o'clock" can be said only in hours with two zeros (1:00, 2:00, ...
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2answers
51 views

How to refer to times with two zeros? (1:00, 2:00, 3:00 etc.)

How to refer to times with two zeros, such as: 1:00, 2:00, 3:00 etc. (excludes hours with minutes such as 1:01, 2:01, 3:10 etc.)? Should I refer to them as "completed hours" / "closed hours"/ "round ...
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2answers
37 views

When should I say “AM” / “PM” and when should I say “o'clock”?

When I am asked "what time is it", when should I say "It is 1 o'clock" and when I should say "It is 1 AM /PM"? and in addition, could it be that both of them can be said continuously (It is 1 AM / PM ...
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1answer
232 views

Can I say 11:30 as eleven and a half?

When we talk time, I know I can say eleven thirty or half-past eleven for 11:30. But how about eleven and a half? Is it correct?
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2answers
631 views

I am having vs I have

I'm finally learning English grammar, and I'm having an issue with understanding the difference between: Now I have much more fun learning English than I had before the course. and Now I am having ...
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1answer
557 views

What does it mean “a few weeks into”?

What exactly does it mean "a few weeks into"? I've seen such translations into my L1 where it meant both right after starting sth Two weeks intothe job, we had that vortex in the east river. and ...
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6answers
6k views

How do I start a sentence with a date?

I want to say: August 22, 2012, the day my life changed forever and the day I met you. My only problem is that I don't know how to start a sentence with a date. If someone could help me with this ...
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3answers
48 views

Preposition when speaking about time record

I want to say something in meaning of "You've made the record at?/in? 2 seconds" - basically a user answers questions and time to answer is measured. After each question, I want to say if a new record ...
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1answer
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Present Perfect: It's the last time

What is the difference between "It's the last time I've explained this to you" and "It's the last time I'm explaining this to you"? I mean, this is the situtation where I'm explaining something to ...
22
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6answers
2k views

Day vs 24h day?

In Russian (my native language) there are two words - "день" and "сутки". First means day, just a day, probably lightest part of it, second - 24 hours from 00:00 to 00:00. There is a strict difference ...
245
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10answers
67k views

Why is 11 am + 1 hour == 12:00 pm?

One hour after 11:00 am is 12:00 pm. I find this to be very strange. Why isn't it 12:00 am? More descriptively, I thought we can think of the am/pm part as time unit representing higher amount ...
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1answer
41 views

Can we use “later” instead of “from now”?

It is Jan and you will fly to Japan in March. In American English, you say: "I will fly to Japan 2 months from now". Can you instead say "I will fly to Japan 2 months later"? Is there any other ...
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1answer
2k views

16:00 o'clock afternoon or 16:00 o'clock evening? [closed]

Should I refer to 16:00 o'clock as afternoon or as evening? In winter, when the days are short, and it becomes dark already at this time already in many countries, and therefore it is not clear to ...
3
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2answers
122 views

Does “before Dec 10 midnight” mean “before Dec 09 - 23:59” or “before Dec 10 - 23:59”?

When a deadline says, submit "before Dec 10 midnight". Does it mean "before Dec 09 - 23:59" or "before Dec 10 - 23:59"?
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1answer
29 views

“the most” and “for much”

For much of the 1990s, the Czech political landscape was dominated by the Civic Democratic Party. The most of the 1990s the Czech political landscape was dominated by the Civic Democratic Party. I ...
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1answer
31 views

From in or about and between

I was reading the indictment of Paul J. Manafort, as published by The New York Times, and I got stuck on a sentence starting with From in or about and between 2006 and 2017 [...] I understand ...
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1answer
16 views

Past/after in the given context

It's past 2 in the morning, who could be calling now? It's after 2 in the morning, who could be calling now? Is it correct to say either?
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1answer
43 views

Can we use “Two next sessions” here?

I wanted to ask my teacher not to teach one grammar in a session that I'm absent. I have class Saturday/Monday/Wednesday A) Imagine today is Wednesday B) My teacher wants to teach that grammar in 2 ...
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2answers
20 views

How to interpret “5 weeks into my degree”?

I was wondering whether it meant: I started my degree 5 weeks ago I finished my degree 5 weeks ago (I found this in an online dictionary) I will be finishing my degree in 5 weeks
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1answer
116 views

The common practice to describe time

When we speak about time, we often say like one-twenty one. Is it common to write time like this, especially to teach primary students to write time like this ?
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3answers
49 views

meaning of “come eleven a.m. or so”

I'm reading The Fermented Man by Derek Dillinger. The author talks about his reaction towards sugary sweets after one year of eating very simply. It turns out the average amount of sugar most ...
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1answer
24 views

“He was smiling while he listened to the story”. Question about using progressive here

I'm trying to understand the grammar of this sentence. As far as I understand it, while in this situation is a temporal conjunction and denotes simultaneity. Quirke's CGEL says this: While and ...
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4answers
101 views

Time Question Of a Yahoo News Title

I just have happened to see an article with the headline: Has Trump noticed Putin has cut off Ukraine's Black Port Sea Ports? Now, I am a bit confused, so I would like to picture a time line Past ...
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1answer
638 views

Last vs last for with time

In the Moscow aeroexpress train to Domodedovo airport I heard an announcement, "The trip will last for 45 minutes" and I wonder if for is optional in announcements. Is it said the same way in London ...
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2answers
108 views

until July 28th - meaning

That's all the homework UNTIL July 28th When we say until July 28th , do we count day 28 as well? or does it say all assignments were marked before day 28? While we are it , do we say day 28th or ...
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1answer
891 views

how do we normally greet when some one meet around 2pm to 3.30pm?

How do we normally greet when some one meet around 2pm to 3.30pm ? I know normally after 12.00pm, we called "Good Afternoon", But what if the time is around 2pm to 3.30pm ? Usage : When I'm ...