Questions tagged [time]

For questions about expressing time in English.

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How to say expedite a process by two times

Let's assume that we have a process that takes 10 minutes to finish. Now, we come up with a new way that can do the process in 2 minutes. A few questions: How can we say this sentence correctly: The ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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for using our equipment

a. They paid a large sum for using our equipment. b. They paid a large sum to use our equipment. Can one tell whether we were paid before they used our equipment or after they used our equipment? c....
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3 votes
2 answers
489 views

paid him to repair

a. I paid him for repairing my computer. b. The money I gave him was for repairing my computer. c. I paid him to repair my computer. d. The money I gave him was for him to repair my computer. e. ...
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after a period + an event (After 10 days after purchase)

I purchased a fan. After 10 days, it makes noise. Can I rephrase the sentence to the following? My fan quickly makes noise after 10 days after purchase. The "after ... after" part seems ...
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Is it correct "I have been reading the book three hours."?

Compare the two sentences below: A: I have been reading the book for three hours. B: I have been reading the book three hours. I know A is obviously correct. But my question is: Is B also correct? ...
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a much defeated man

a. He was a much defeated man. In the record of the Canadian Parliament from 1885 b. He was a very much defeated man. In Rehabilitation Client Assessment - Page 41 Do these mean that He had been ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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he was very annoyed

a. He was very much annoyed. b. He was annoyed much. c. He was annoyed very much. I think (b) and (c) sound a bit strange. I think (b) and (c) could mean that he was often annoyed. I think could refer ...
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What does "passing smokes stage" mean?

The goddess Dhūmavatī is described as Vivarnā, Chañchalā and Rustā with her rough behaviour and unclean robes. Her appearance is like a widow sitting on a chariot carried by a crow. This goddess ...
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Can I use the word "duration" for an ongoing event which has no estimated end?

Can I use the word "duration" for an ongoing event which has no estimated end? An example: "The duration of this rain is 25 minutes". It started 25 minutes ago, and it is still ...
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1 answer
32 views

Is 'not until' correct here?

A: So when did he let you know he was dating your ex? B: He didn't really. Not until recently. Is 'not until' correct and idiomatic here? (if I intend it to mean that the guy dating the ex didn't ...
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8 votes
2 answers
2k views

"In my early 20s, ..." or "In my earlier 20s, ...."

In my earlier 20s, I had a quite obsessive and controlling relationship with food and exercise The sentence is from the BBC "In my earlier 20s" does not sound right to me. I often hear ...
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4 votes
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"in the morning" vs "on cold mornings"

I always know is "in the morning" until I read this article "should I let my vehicle warm up on cold mornings?" Why did it use "on cold mornings" instead of "in cold ...
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1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Can we use the time expression (... ago) in past perfect tense?

I've read it somewhere that the time expression (... ago) (e.g. two days ago, two weeks ago, etc.) is only used in the simple past. But in the exercise on unit 35, Advanced Grammar in Use I found this ...
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1 vote
1 answer
422 views

Are "as of writing" and "at the time of writing" both correct?

I see that 'at the time of writing' is grammatically correct (Is 'at the time of writing' correct?). Is this replaceable with 'as of writing'?
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3 answers
63 views

Can I use exact (clock) time as an introductory phrase after "At"?

As in: "At 2:15 AM, she entered the victim's bedroom carrying a knife." Can that exact time be considered a part of an introductory phrase and split the sentence with a comma? Also, if that ...
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1 vote
1 answer
46 views

When the enrollments were done?

For example, Staff members who enroll in courses related to business over the summer will have their tuition fees reimbursed in September. The current problem for me of the above sentence is totally ...
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0 votes
1 answer
119 views

I took last/the last week off - can I use that on Monday to indicate I did not work the week before? [closed]

It is Monday, and I want to tell my colleague I was not in the office the week before (last week?). Would it be ok to say: I took last week off Is that correct?
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Should I use verb or noun when talking about time it took to do something?

An example from the computer science. Which one is "more" correct compilation time or compile time? Google translate suggests compile time. However in similar scenario with "generate&...
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13 votes
6 answers
2k views

Can we put 'just' before 'on time'?

I was reading a text-block in my book regarding the difference between in time and on time, and I noticed before in time, the writer (of the book) put just in 2 different examples. Here are the ...
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2 votes
2 answers
57 views

How to say that I start doing something from this year/season

I would like to say that something starts at the particular moment, e.g. year or season. How should I pose it? For instance. I watched movies alone before, but starting from this winter, I plan to ...
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1 vote
2 answers
123 views

Is the sentence "our son was born in the last week" correct? (Using preposition and definite article with time units)

Our son was born last week does not sound weird to me. Actually Our son was born in the last week sounds a little bit unusual. But thinking about it, I find the latter one more correct grammatically. ...
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1 answer
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How better to describe exact time in future [duplicate]

What tense is better to use ? I’m sending you the sheets tomorrow at 5pm. (As it was planned before saying.) I will send you the sheets tomorrow at 5pm. Or there is another alternative in my mind ...
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4 votes
4 answers
1k views

How to refer to particular years in a specific century in one expression?

If I need to mention the year and the century how do I say that in one sentence? They moved abroad in the 70s in the twentieth century. They have a collection of paintings painted in the 70s in the ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
234 views

What does it mean "It's five to twelve"? [closed]

Is it 11:55? OR 12:05? It's quite ambiguous in Korean.
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1 vote
1 answer
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Does " I will go at x o'clock," imply I will arrive at said time, or does it imply I will have left for the bar at said time

For example, If I were to say, "I will go to the bar at two o'clock," does it imply I will arrive at said time, or does it imply I will have left for the bar at said time.
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1 answer
232 views

Question about using 'how many days' in interrogative sentences

As far as I observed people would use when instead, but still, I wonder if the sentences below are grammatically correct. How many days later will you come (back)? After how many days will you be ...
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1 vote
4 answers
118 views

Can we say “some time” when talking about a short unspecified time?

In dictionaries I looked at, it says “some time” is used when talking about an unspecified long time. Is it wrong to use it when talking about, say, a few minutes? For instance, let’s say someone ...
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1 vote
1 answer
281 views

I will be free any time of the day

I'm setting up a meeting for my job application, and I can't get my head around this. To answer your question, I will be available next week on Wednesday and Thursday, that is the 9 and 10 June. The ...
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0 votes
1 answer
469 views

On/at with morning/afternoon/evening/night [duplicate]

I have a sentence: Happiness is drinking a glass of champagne on a hot summer afternoon. So I'm thinking if we want to say the same about night do we have at night or on [article] night? I know we say ...
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1 vote
1 answer
30 views

Help understanding "again" at the end of "a long time before he saw his family again"

It would be a long time before he saw his family again. I understand nothing of this sentence. The times it expresses. Specially "again" at the end confuse me.
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1 answer
600 views

Correct birthday date format in England

What is the correct date formate in England? If I want to write someone's birthday date what is the correct way to do it? "Born May 5, 2000 at 05:00", or "Born 5th May, 2000 at 05:00&...
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1 vote
0 answers
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in the (time) vs in (time)

I know "in the morning" is correct and "in morning" is not. But why are "in the summer" and "in summer" both correct? How do you know when to use an article or ...
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0 votes
1 answer
51 views

I { have been/went} to New York in 2015

Which one is right? I have been to New York in 2015. and I went to New York in 2015. I think the first one is wrong and the second one is right. but still, I am not sure if we can use 'in time' in ...
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1 vote
1 answer
42 views

Find time to practice English

Is 'find time' a natural thing to say? "No matter how busy I am, I need to find time to practice English." "Even though you're a busy man, you should still find some free time to spend ...
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0 votes
3 answers
2k views

"I will see you on Monday morning" vs. "I will see you Monday morning" [duplicate]

I will see you on Monday morning. I will see you Monday morning. Is the second version idiomatic and grammatically correct? Which version do native speakers prefer to use more?
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0 votes
1 answer
78 views

Prepositions used when referring to a country's timezone: 7 o'clock at/by Moskow time [duplicate]

Let's meet at 7 o'clock at Moskow time Let's meet at 7 o'clock by Moskow time Is the first or the second one correct? If they are both inaccurate, can you please give a correct version? And did I ...
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1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Should time clauses contain had?

A small mercy, that, thought Barristan Selmy, as he rode into the market square inside Meereen’s great western gate. When Daenerys had taken the city, they had broken through that same gate with the ...
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0 answers
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Can you remove "days" from "came just days after"?

The announcement late on Monday came just days after Ma's online shopping giant Alibaba was hit with a record $2.8 billion antitrust fine. In the above sentence, can "days after" could be ...
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0 votes
1 answer
134 views

Prepositions of time ranges including or excluding the endpoints of the range

I came across a non-authoritative source (no link to source possible) that stated the following for time ranges: between-and, excludes both endpoints, e.g., between May and July - meaning: June from-...
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0 votes
1 answer
100 views

"Next week" vs. "in the next few days"

According to grammar that we don't put any preposition before next week, year, month etc. but in one of the Outcome books I found this sentence: Passengers who are flying IN the next few days should ...
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1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Time expression

Is it right to write: At quarter (to) seven I have breakfast with my Xyz. My understanding is that it must be: I have breakfast with my Xyz in the kitchen at quarter seven. because I was taught ...
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2 votes
2 answers
84 views

Every hour, e.g. 10:00, 11:00

What is a commonly used expression meaning "at every hour", e.g. 10:00, 11:00, 12:00 but not 10:18, 11:18, 12:18? "Every hour" does not seem to distinguish between the two cases. ...
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Any grammatical patterns for using the word, 'all', in "all (last night/yesterday/today/next month)"

In this question, I am focusing on the word, 'all', combined with the following phrases. I have made up the sets of similar examples below: a) "I had a headache all last night." (correct) b)...
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1 vote
1 answer
86 views

Where should I use "over the past decade" in this sentence?

It seems to me that it is better to use 'over the past decade' at the start of this sentence rather than the end, although I am not too sure why! "There is an ever increasing number of people ...
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0 votes
2 answers
71 views

'the second', 'the moment' compared to 'as soon as' with respect to simultaneousness

I am looking for expressions that can substitute for as soon as as in the following context. What is important in this context is that the melting of snow happens extremely simultaneously and ...
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2 votes
2 answers
79 views

Is there any future tense in English grammar?

The future tense is a verb tense used for a future activity or a future state of being. For example: I will jump in the lake. (This is a future activity.) I will be happy. (This is a future state of ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
43 views

Which (if either) of these two possibilities is the better choice?

Could you please tell me which of the following sentences is right? Please arrange a meeting for today, 10 a.m. so that we can finalize the plan. Please arrange a meeting so that we can finalize the ...
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0 votes
3 answers
305 views

When it is not mentioned whether it is PM or AM, does 12:00 mean 12:00 noon?

This is the deadline: 15 December 2020, 12:00 CET. Does that mean that the deadline is 13 December 2020, 12:00 Noon CET?
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0 votes
2 answers
75 views

"haven’t even had to say that" and "They have taken"

They have taken her for someone worse so they called her stupid. They haven’t even had to say it, because I have seen their attitudes (towards her) after their behavior. "haven’t even had to say ...
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0 votes
2 answers
50 views

Using perfect forms for ''for''

So, the rule I have been taught is that 'for' and 'since' must be used with perfect forms, i.e. I have been living in London for 3 years/since 2017. This presents two problems for me: 1.- What if the ...
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