Questions tagged [to-infinitive]

For questions about the "base" form of a verb when it is used with "to". See "bare-infinitives" for questions about the base form of a verb when it is used without "to".

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Fruits tend to decay. (to infinitive)

Fruits tend to decay. 'to infinitive' usually has three types of usage such as noun, adjective, adverb To give up smoking is hard. (as noun) books to read (as adjective) went there to meet him (as ...
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relative pronouns, to infinitive, present participle. Are they interchangeable?

Armstrong was the first man who walked on the moon. Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. Armstrong was the first man walking on the moon. Are they all the same? If not, what it the ...
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"ways/steps to increase" And "ways/step to increasing"

Way and step I happened to read some sentences containing phrases with two similar forms such as Subject Verb to Verb... and Subject Verb to Verb-ing... I come up examples for each. "I find ...
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What's the grammar behind "keep up his demands to be sent heavy weapons"?

This article says: Something we do know, though, is that Zelensky plans to keep up his demands to be sent heavy weapons to help combat the Russian military. I believe he is demanding that heavy ...
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Is 'What I prefer is to spending time with you' correct grammatically? [duplicate]

I have seen a promotional video for Beyond the Future in Mr Love: Queen's Choice, I copied its lines and want to rewrite them to practice my expression and grammar. Here is the one confused me of the ...
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Is 'to be waiting for me...' equal to 'were waiting for me...' in this sentence?

This is a sentence I saw in my practice book. I don't expect them to be waiting for me. I want to rewrite it as 'I don't expect them were waiting for me', because it is more nature for me, a non-...
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Infinitive as a subject in a question

I know I can use an infinitive as subject, but I haven't seen it used in a question. Is it possible? Is to take care of your cat easy?
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Why does this sentence 'I find it difficult to speak English fluently' have no copula? [closed]

Moreover, is 'I find it is difficult to speak English fluently' incorrect or unnatural?
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Is 'We are impossible to master English in a short time' unnatural?

I'm Chinese, my teacher told me don't use the means of code-switching to learn foreign languages, she made an instance for this: Chinese: 我们不可能在很短的时间内就掌握英语。 Divided into words by gaps: 我们 不可能 在 很短的 ...
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Why is the correct answer 'to have been cleaned'?

I'm doing my grammar practice of infinitive verbs. The room is said ( ) last week. A. to clean B. to be cleaned C. to have cleaned D. to have been cleaned √ According to my intuition of English ...
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Which one is correct? When asked to comment / When he being asked to comment / When asking to comment / When he asked comment

I'm doing my grammar homework, but it really kills me. ( ).He refused to given any explanation. A. When asked to comment on the quality of the goods. B. When he being asked to comment. C. When asking ...
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2 answers
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Rules are made to be broken vs He is the man to rely on

He is the man to rely on and Rules are made to be broken What's the difference between the to and to be in these two sentences? Can I say both sentences the other way around? He is the man to be ...
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Is it okay to conjugate the verb 'let' (means 'rent') in this way?

'To let' seems like an irregular and special infinitive-verb phrase, which can express the meaning of a passive verb as an intransitive one. This house is to let.
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Can we say "how to not to be..."?

You should learn about how to not to be egoistic. 2 people (both are English native speakers) have corrected my sentence above, You should learn how not to be egoistical. You should learn how to not ...
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Which one is correct? "it will help me address the issue" or it will help me to address"? [duplicate]

Which one of these two phrases is correct? it will help me address the issue or it will help me to address the issue
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Sentences with :- helping verbs(except do and have)+to+verb

If I were to do this, it would be better. All of these are to be considered music for us. I have never seen helping verbs like 'are' and 'were' being used with 'to' in this way. What do 'were to do' ...
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Use of to-infinitive

I would like to travel places, to see the world and to try exquisite cuisines. Or I would like to travel places, see the world and try exquisite cuisines. Is it necessary to use "to" for ...
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Do bare infinitives/to infinitives/gerunds refer to both unfinished action and finished action?

Do infinitives and gerunds refer to both unfinished action and finished action? For example, I started building a house. In this case, “building a house” refers to unfinished action. I finished ...
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I'm too late to remind him

Suppose my brother's school is closed today (for some reason). I knew it and he did too. But he forgot it and left for school. After that I say this to our mother: I'm too late to remind him his ...
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Is it grammatically correct to put "to" and "within" together in sentence "this is confirmed by experiment to within strict limits"?

a post says the photon is a massless particle. According to theory it has energy and momentum but no mass, and this is confirmed by experiment to within strict limits. Is it grammatically correct ...
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a medium to store wealth

Is the following sentence OK? Can "medium" take an infinitive as a modifier? Should "a medium" be preceded by "as"? Money has two main functions: a medium of exchange ...
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to make the lights even safer

I'm wondering what function the boldfaced infinitive phrase serves. Does it indicate purpose or result? Morris bought dozens of little telephone switchboard lights, attached them to a pair of long ...
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-1 votes
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She hopes that she will get a loan from her bank

She hopes to get a loan from her bank to help her out of her financial predicament. She hopes that she will get a loan from her bank to help her out of her financial predicament. She is hoping to ...
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He looks so healthy that he does not look that old

Talking about an old healthy crocodile, one of the friends: He looks way too healthy to be looking that old. He looks way too healthy to be that old. Are they both correct? If so, do they mean ...
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What does the "to" in "to spot" mean

I don't understand which situation I've to use this usage of "to". What can be an interchangeable word for this? Having promised a large reward to the first man to spot land, Columbus ...
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There are only a few days left for the exam(s)

There are only a few days left for the exam(s). There are only a few days left for the exam(s) to start. There are only a few days left until the exam(s). There are only a few days left before the ...
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Me: "Wrote a program to merge the datasets." Friend: "Okay. So, did your program actually merge the datasets?" Petty or correct?

My dear friend is being too critical of me. I wrote the following in my resume: Wrote a program in R to efficiently integrate and match student data from multiple sources. Then he says "So did ...
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Is 'yet to arrive' a direct object of 'have'?

They have yet to arrive. In this sentence, the understood meaning is that 'they' are going to arrive, but they haven't arrived yet. However, I'm struggling to break this down grammatically. In the ...
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When is is correct to use 'to' after 'must' and how it affects the meaning?

I have seen some scenarios where we use 'to' after 'must'. All languages are must to learn. This usage is correct while, You must to learn cooking. This usage is wrong. Why is it wrong in terms of ...
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13 votes
3 answers
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Is "I will never know what makes the rain to fall?" correct?

I'll never know what makes the rain to fall. I have read a post about make something to+verb /make something+verb? The answers shows the above sentence is correct, but when I paste it to a grammar ...
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That is worth (it) to build

That is worth (it) to build Is it optional here? According to Wiktionary, worth it is an adjective synonymous of worthwile.
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What is the grammatical function of the to-infinitive after this prepositional phrase?

I waited for him to arrive. In this quotation, what is the function of 'to arrive'? I know that to-infinitives are verbs; however, I wish to understand its functionality in this specific sentence. Is ...
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Can modifying phrases (adjectival and adverbial) be stacked/chained?

He walked on the road with pace. In the example above, there are two prepositional phrases: 'on the road' and 'with pace.' These both function adverbially, modifying 'walked.' Is this grammatically ...
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"To" or "that" after passive construction?

When I study, I saw sentence like this: Earthquake rupture has been thought to happen by enlargement of a crack. There is a information for this sentence in my book and by the way "has been ...
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1 answer
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Is the phrase 'as to' always followed by a noun?

I was reading an article regarding idioms, and one of the contributors complained about the incorrect usage of grammar in professional writing. The exact topic isn't important, but something caught my ...
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Is there any difference in the meaning of continued to fight and continued fighting?

I want to know the difference in the meaning of the two sentences below. I continued to fight. I continued fighting. What is the difference in the meaning of the two sentences? Please, let me know.
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Should I use gerund only in the sentence like "I postpone meeting"?

I think the word 'postpone' is related to the future tense. But after postpone, we learned that we should use gerund only. I think that the word 'postpone' matches to-infinite. Is it impossible to use ...
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3 votes
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Direct objects of "teaching a skill"

If you teach someone to do something, you give them instructions so that they know how to do it. When teach is used with a to-infinitive like this, it must have a direct object. He taught ✳(me) to ...
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I expect Jay will come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not

I expect Jay will come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not. I expect Jay to come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not. Do the alternatives, doesn't and won't, have the same meaning ...
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People value having choices / People value to have choices, which one is correct and why?

I always struggle with this and I don't get the difference, which one of the following sentences is correct and why? People value having choices People value to have choices
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about "so … as to"

I think the following sentences have similar meanings. He is intelligent enough to solve this question. He is so intelligent as to solve this question. On the other hand, do the following sentences ...
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key to determine sth or to determining sth?

I would like to know the difference in meaning between to-infinitive and to-preposition. That will be the key to determine the profit outlook for bank We had found the key to determining a good ...
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Can subjects be used as objects? [duplicate]

This robot is designed to play with. (The robot is designed for being played, so I can play with the robot.) This water is too hot to drink. (The water is too hot, so I cannot drink the water.) “Play ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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Can I omit “to be” in "I want you (to be) happy."?

I want you (to be) happy. I like you (to be) happy. I hope you (to be) happy. I protect you (to be) safe. Can I omit “to be” in this way?
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It was the best school for me to go to

It was the best school for me to have gone to. It was the best school for me to go to. What is the difference between (1) and (2)? Can I replace the "was" in them with "is" ...
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“The largest bird ever to exist”

As I’ve known, a to-infinitive is used as an adjective referring to something that hasn’t happened yet, but I found a to-infinitive is used to refer to something that has already happened-“the largest ...
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1 answer
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Why is "to" used in "climate scientists TO issue stark warning"? [duplicate]

World’s climate scientists to issue stark warning over global heating threat In this sentence why there is “to” before verb “issue”? Is there any grammatical rule about this usage of “to” ?
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Is “for+object” a part of a non-finite clause?

For example, is “for me” in “it’s necessary for me to learn English” a part of a non-finite clause or just a independent prepositional phrase?
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1 answer
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“There’s food to be cooked yesterday”

Can I use “there’s food to be cooked yesterday” instead of “there’s yesterday-cooked food”? It means literally there is food which was cooked yesterday.
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1 vote
2 answers
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Is it wrong to pronounce "to" as /tə/ before words starting with vowels?

In Oxford Dictionary, it says it is correct to pronounce "to" as /tə/ only before words starting with a consonant. It seems fair to me too because /tə/ sounds off and unsmooth before vowels; ...
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