Questions tagged [to-infinitive]

For questions about the "base" form of a verb when it is used with "to". See "bare-infinitives" for questions about the base form of a verb when it is used without "to".

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68 views

Me: "Wrote a program to merge the datasets." Friend: "Okay. So, did your program actually merge the datasets?" Petty or correct?

My dear friend is being too critical of me. I wrote the following in my resume: Wrote a program in R to efficiently integrate and match student data from multiple sources. Then he says "So did ...
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43 views

Is 'yet to arrive' a direct object of 'have'?

They have yet to arrive. In this sentence, the understood meaning is that 'they' are going to arrive, but they haven't arrived yet. However, I'm struggling to break this down grammatically. In the ...
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25 views

When is is correct to use 'to' after 'must' and how it affects the meaning?

I have seen some scenarios where we use 'to' after 'must'. All languages are must to learn. This usage is correct while, You must to learn cooking. This usage is wrong. Why is it wrong in terms of ...
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Is "I will never know what makes the rain to fall?" correct?

I'll never know what makes the rain to fall. I have read a post about make something to+verb /make something+verb? The answers shows the above sentence is correct, but when I paste it to a grammar ...
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7 views

That is worth (it) to build

That is worth (it) to build Is it optional here? According to Wiktionary, worth it is an adjective synonymous of worthwile.
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36 views

What is the grammatical function of the to-infinitive after this prepositional phrase?

I waited for him to arrive. In this quotation, what is the function of 'to arrive'? I know that to-infinitives are verbs; however, I wish to understand its functionality in this specific sentence. Is ...
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2answers
18 views

Can modifying phrases (adjectival and adverbial) be stacked/chained?

He walked on the road with pace. In the example above, there are two prepositional phrases: 'on the road' and 'with pace.' These both function adverbially, modifying 'walked.' Is this grammatically ...
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44 views

"To" or "that" after passive construction?

When I study, I saw sentence like this: Earthquake rupture has been thought to happen by enlargement of a crack. There is a information for this sentence in my book and by the way "has been ...
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23 views

Is the phrase 'as to' always followed by a noun?

I was reading an article regarding idioms, and one of the contributors complained about the incorrect usage of grammar in professional writing. The exact topic isn't important, but something caught my ...
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34 views

Is there any difference in the meaning of continued to fight and continued fighting?

I want to know the difference in the meaning of the two sentences below. I continued to fight. I continued fighting. What is the difference in the meaning of the two sentences? Please, let me know.
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23 views

Should I use gerund only in the sentence like "I postpone meeting"?

I think the word 'postpone' is related to the future tense. But after postpone, we learned that we should use gerund only. I think that the word 'postpone' matches to-infinite. Is it impossible to use ...
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106 views

Direct objects of "teaching a skill"

If you teach someone to do something, you give them instructions so that they know how to do it. When teach is used with a to-infinitive like this, it must have a direct object. He taught ✳(me) to ...
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38 views

I expect Jay will come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not

I expect Jay will come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not. I expect Jay to come, so I'll be disappointed if he does/will not. Do the alternatives, doesn't and won't, have the same meaning ...
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20 views

People value having choices / People value to have choices, which one is correct and why?

I always struggle with this and I don't get the difference, which one of the following sentences is correct and why? People value having choices People value to have choices
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about "so … as to"

I think the following sentences have similar meanings. He is intelligent enough to solve this question. He is so intelligent as to solve this question. On the other hand, do the following sentences ...
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17 views

key to determine sth or to determining sth?

I would like to know the difference in meaning between to-infinitive and to-preposition. That will be the key to determine the profit outlook for bank We had found the key to determining a good ...
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34 views

Can subjects be used as objects? [duplicate]

This robot is designed to play with. (The robot is designed for being played, so I can play with the robot.) This water is too hot to drink. (The water is too hot, so I cannot drink the water.) “Play ...
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Can I omit “to be” in "I want you (to be) happy."?

I want you (to be) happy. I like you (to be) happy. I hope you (to be) happy. I protect you (to be) safe. Can I omit “to be” in this way?
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34 views

It was the best school for me to go to

It was the best school for me to have gone to. It was the best school for me to go to. What is the difference between (1) and (2)? Can I replace the "was" in them with "is" ...
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80 views

“The largest bird ever to exist”

As I’ve known, a to-infinitive is used as an adjective referring to something that hasn’t happened yet, but I found a to-infinitive is used to refer to something that has already happened-“the largest ...
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30 views

Why is "to" used in "climate scientists TO issue stark warning"? [duplicate]

World’s climate scientists to issue stark warning over global heating threat In this sentence why there is “to” before verb “issue”? Is there any grammatical rule about this usage of “to” ?
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36 views

Is “for+object” a part of a non-finite clause?

For example, is “for me” in “it’s necessary for me to learn English” a part of a non-finite clause or just a independent prepositional phrase?
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“There’s food to be cooked yesterday”

Can I use “there’s food to be cooked yesterday” instead of “there’s yesterday-cooked food”? It means literally there is food which was cooked yesterday.
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Is it wrong to pronounce "to" as /tə/ before words starting with vowels?

In Oxford Dictionary, it says it is correct to pronounce "to" as /tə/ only before words starting with a consonant. It seems fair to me too because /tə/ sounds off and unsmooth before vowels; ...
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Is the “to” in “the first person to seriously consider” a preposition or “to + verb”?

In this sentence, She's the first person in her immediate family to seriously consider getting it. "to" is not used as "to + verb", right? If so, it is used as a preposition, but ...
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20 views

To infinitive as object complement

i have a question concerning whether "to resist" in the sentence below is an object complement. "He lacked the strength to resist"
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What kind of grammar construction is this?

I came across this sentence in "English Grammar In Use Supplementary Exercises". The following sentence is: "We had hoped to be living (live) in our new house by now, but the builders ...
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one of 15 astronauts to have landed on Mars [closed]

Are the following sentences okay? a. Peter is one of 15 astronauts to have landed on Mars. b. Peter is an astronaut to have landed on Mars. If there's any difference in acceptability, could you ...
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Its surveillance apparatus is (mostly) in order to monitor

Its surveillance apparatus is (mostly) to monitor budget deficits in real time, but it could also help to evaluate the future consequences of policy decisions. (with or without "mostly") ...
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27 views

the replanning and rebuilding of cities to stem

The nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries saw devastating outbreaks of cholera, typhoid, typhus and influenza in European cities. Physicians such as Jon Snow, from England, and Rudolf Virchow, of ...
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to + ing form. as an example, "to connecting people

In this sentence: Lincoln Park Zoo is dedicated to connecting people with nature by providing a family-oriented... Can I write "dedicated to connect people with nature"? If not, why do I ...
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1answer
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Doubt on the infinitive usage

I've been recently studying the verb patterns with which we use the infinitive and the -ing form (e.g. I suggest meeting tomorrow at my house, NOT: I suggest to meet tomorrow at my house). But later, ...
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Gerund or to-infinitive in the sentence

I read that after the phrase "used to" we use gerund. I read this sentence: "He does not remember how Mike used to worry him." When I read this sentence, it gives better sense to ...
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For someone to do something vs so that

I was wondering, if there is any difference between "for someone to do" and "so that". For instance, Is "many parents used to beat their children for them to study" the ...
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87 views

"This computer is for you to attend lectures" instead of "*This computer is to attend lectures."

I learned that you use "for -ing" and not a 'to' infinitive when you want to say the purpose of a tool, but I am not so sure about it. People told me I should say: This computer is for you ...
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What part of speech is this "to be grown"?

The original sentence is The plant itself is the only variety of orchid to be grown on a commercial scale. I only want to know the function or the role of to be grown here. Is it the complement? ...
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8 views

Want something adjective vs want something to be adjective

I was wondering if there is any difference between Want something adjective vs want something to be adjective! for example, "I want him alive" vs "I want him to be alive", Is there ...
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7 views

Is "to" needed when using "shall"?

It's Helen's birthday soon. You want to give her a present, but what? You ask your friend: ______? Any ideas? My answer: What shall I give to Helen? Is that correct? My book solution gives the ...
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43 views

Active Infinitives vs. Passive Infinitives. Which one is more suitable for formal writing?

I have seen the following sentence: They gave me a question too hard to answer. However, in my opinion, this use of active infinitive is ungrammatical here, and the following passive Infinitive ...
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32 views

Can infinitive-to and gerund be alternated in a sentence if it contains more than 2 "to"?

Sally reminded me to ask you to tell Bob to remember to bring his soccer ball to the picnic. The sentence above, somehow seems unnatural and not good to me. Can I alternate with gerunds as follows? ...
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Why does "a comma" exist between "to+infinitive clause" and "a relative clause" in this sentence?

In the link https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/declaration-transcript, it is written We hold these truths to be self-evident , that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their ...
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What the difference between in beginning a phrase with infinitive form or -ing form?

What the difference between in beginning a phrase with to-infinitive form or -ing form? To create a signing configuration and assign it to your release build type using Android Studio, complete the ...
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When should I use the infinite `to´ at the end of a sentence?

When should I use the infinitive "to" at the end of a sentence? For example: My father said that I have to clean the bathroom, but I don't want to. Or can I just say My father said that I ...
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323 views

'end up to find' or "end up finding"? Gerund vs Infinitive?

What is the reason for using "finding" in this sentence and not "to find"? "These newcomers often end up not (to find)/(finding) the opportunities they are looking for."
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Could anybody explain this sentence - The movies gathered here are those that the authors feel to have had the most seismic impact

Why does the author use "to have had" instead of "have had"? Why did he choose to use an infinitive? What grammatical rule is implied here? The full sentence goes The movies ...
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2answers
129 views

raise money to do

The fundraising committee, chaired by Charles Stoddard and including Dr. G.P. Twitchell, Judge F.N. Thompson, Frank P. Forbes, and Walter S. Carson, successfully raised enough money to construct the ...
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21 views

To-infinitive, intransitive verb

Asking about ‘to-infinitive’ The phrase below is a part of a sentence and I want to know how this is grammatically correct. “~a world that had stripped him of his manhood, of his power to provide.” ...
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50 views

be careful to do something

If you are careful to do something, does it mean you do it carefully, or you are careful in order to do it? What is the function of the infinitival phrase?
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278 views

"a house to live in" vs. "a place to live"

"They need a house to live in." In this sentence, you can't omit "in", right? But "They need a place to live." In this sentence, you can omit "in", right? Why ...
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286 views

"started to get", "started getting" or "started to getting" - which is correct?

From that point things started to get complicated. From that point things started getting complicated. From that point things started to getting complicated. Which of these sentences would be correct,...

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