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Questions tagged [transatlantic-differences]

Questions about the differences between English as used in Britain and Ireland on one hand and Canada and the United States on the other.

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Does this qualify as an alley?

The link in my previous post didn't work, so I deleted that post. Hopefully, this link works. (It works on my laptop.) link
Idk29's user avatar
  • 371
3 votes
2 answers
730 views

I got something for you

Context : I found that my friend have been sad recently. I decided to buy a gift for her to surprise and make her happy again. Now, I meet her in our class. I give it to her and say: Me: How are you? ...
LE123's user avatar
  • 375
0 votes
1 answer
83 views

"A purple bander copy"

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 19) (in the classroom; Mr Shrubs, the teacher; William and Martin, choristers at King's College, Cambridge) It took a ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,511
7 votes
4 answers
2k views

Do native speakers say "I'm [keen on/fond of] cloudy days"?

I'm learning some different ways to say "I like", and to my mind right now, keen on, fond of, and like are pretty much the same. However, since I almost never said keen on and fond of before,...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
5 votes
6 answers
3k views

Is this a school badge?

Is this called a school badge? According to Oxford Dictionary badge: (British English) (North American English patch) a piece of material that you sew onto clothes as part of a uniform the school ...
Tom's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
65 views

Difference between "play in defense", "play on defense" and "play defense"

two sentences from oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) (BrE): She plays in defence. (2) (AmE): She plays on defense. As far as I understood, (1) = (2). the explanation of "to play defense" ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,953
1 vote
1 answer
82 views

1) A dictionary says "on a weekend" is a British informal phrase. Is it so? 2) "On the weekend of" is used in US and "at the weekend of" in UK, right?

As I understood, "at" is used with "weekend" in UK and "on" in US. But there are some examples in a dictionary that confused me. oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: on a ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,953
6 votes
4 answers
2k views

Differences in Usage: 'Cellphone' vs. 'Mobile Phone' in English

I've often come across two terms that seem to refer to the same device but are used differently: "cellphone" and "mobile phone." I'm curious about the differences in the usage of ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
77 views

Understanding the Difference Between 'Initiate' and 'Begin' in English Usage

Recently, I've been trying to understand the distinction between "initiate" and "begin." Both words seem to refer to the start of something, but I sense that they are used in ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
72 views

in a long time [AE vs BE]

I haven't seen Ben in a long time. I wonder if he's still alive and kicking. [From E-DIC, which is an English-Japanese dictionary.] Question: Is in correct in British English? I suspect that in is ...
Kaguyahime's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
166 views

'a/an' before acronyms: British vs American

I learned English grammar by reading a few books published by OUP (a British organization/company). According to the books, what determines whether 'a' or 'an' is used before a countable noun is not ...
apadana's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes
1 answer
269 views

What is the difference in using an apostrophe between UK and US?

cambridge.org: UK doll's house cambridge.org: US dollhouse cambridge.org: UK year end cambridge.org: US year's end In the first example, an apostrophe is typical for UK and not typical for US. In the ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,953
4 votes
3 answers
10k views

"I'm not welcome" or "I'm not welcomed"?

When I read an example sentence in Danish Jeg er ikke velkommen that means I'm not welcome, I confused whether people actually use this phrase. Then I tried to ask a question in the other site and ...
user516076's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
133 views

You can buy these from the supermarket. / ...supermarkets

Question: Where can I buy these cakes? Answer 1-You can buy these from the supermarket. (to refer to any supermarkets) Answer 2-You can buy these from supermarkets. I think that we can say ".........
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,573
0 votes
1 answer
343 views

What is the difference between "mortuary" and "morgue"? [closed]

I want to know what's the place in a hospital called where bodies are kept until the time families or the police claim or identify them. Is it "morgue" or "mortuary"? Also, what ...
Madhur's user avatar
  • 355
1 vote
1 answer
114 views

Should the comma be inside the quotes in: I read "The Ghost," a short story by Hann? [duplicate]

A website says: In Edgar Allen Poe’s short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart,” Edgar Allen Poe describes a man with a guilty conscience. It is strange to put a comma inside the double quotation marks like ...
Tom's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
34 views

How much Vs whatever

Send me how many books you have or Send me whatever book you have. My concern is about quantity of book, so which of these both sentences is correct?
Mehjabin's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

a further strain of the virus

Is it okay to speak of "a further strain of the virus" in a context about the Delta variant of COVID-19? Does "a further variant of the virus" sound more natural? I'm wondering if ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
0 votes
0 answers
54 views

American to British English: down/mid/up-towns?

How do you convert down/mid/up towns to British English? Core (less than 2 km2) part of city; usually the financial district American: downtown + city name British: city name + city centre Urban (...
Bósài's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
194 views

The noun "graduate" and verb "to graduate"

According to the Collins Dictionary, the noun "graduate" slightly differs in meaning with regard to the location of speaking: In Britain, a graduate is a person who has successfully ...
Bence Bolla's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
5k views

Is "lovely" a common word in American English?

I hear the word "lovely" a lot in British English TV shows, movies and dramas etc. British people tend to use it a lot. I have been searching for its use in American English but sadly, I ...
user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
3k views

What is this food called in English?

I think technically it's a fruit although they strongly resemble a vegetable: What do you call these? Personally, I know them as ‘paprika’. Others say these are ‘bell peppers’, and only when ground ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
134 views

"Through July 28th" - is this grammatically valid or just a colloquialism?

I was just watching this video. At the end, they are promoting a t-shirt and say: "The offer is valid through July 28th" Now, I've heard this said before but never really given it much thought. It'...
Gamora's user avatar
  • 4,266
7 votes
3 answers
5k views

What do you call a flexible diving platform?

What do you call a flexible diving platform? I just realized this, but in international competition the diving platform isn't always elastic and flexible, but I doubt they are called a diving platform ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
3k views

Fizzy, soft, pop and still drinks

I was curious what people call a carbonated (with gas) and non-carbonated (gas-free) beverages / drinks in English speaking regions around the world. I need two fixed terms in everyday English which ...
A-friend's user avatar
  • 14.3k
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Gray or grey? I'm really not sure [duplicate]

Pretty self-explanatory (I know this is a common question). I'm not sure. Can someone help me out?
Starfire's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

"Huge" or "Enormous" preferable to use in academic writing? [closed]

I would like to know which one, huge or enormous, would be preferable to use in academic writing, such as in the following example: Overcoming the current cancer levels in the population is a ...
R. Joe's user avatar
  • 217
9 votes
3 answers
8k views

Why the hood is also called bonnet?

...but where do you go to learn what is under the hood Trying to understand the operating system is unfortunately not as easy as just opening the bonnet So it seems like hood is equivalent to ...
Kindred's user avatar
  • 343
1 vote
4 answers
892 views

American equivalents of "repeat on" to describe food?

repeat verb 3 British [no object] (of food) be tasted intermittently for some time after being swallowed as a result of belching or indigestion. ‘that cucumber repeated on me for hours’ (...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
13k views

What is the difference between a class teacher and a form teacher?

I can't get which one, class teacher or form teacher or homeroom teacher, in the UK and the US, is what we call "professeur principal" in French secondary schools, meaning one of the teachers of a ...
zenith3's user avatar
  • 947
0 votes
2 answers
4k views

At some point "in future" or "in the future"

Using the is when we refer to something known to the reader or something specific. It is not clear to me how to deal with a word like future. Here is an example: They may get access to the book at ...
None's user avatar
  • 483
6 votes
1 answer
28k views

play the guitar vs play guitar

I was taught that when we want to say "produce sound on a musical instrument", we should always use the definite article before the instrument ("play the guitar/piano/violin"). I did research on this,...
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
-2 votes
2 answers
4k views

What is the difference between secondary/grammar/primary/grade/etc. school? [closed]

There are some minor differences between primary, grade and elementary school, but let's forget them. The same goes for secondary, grammar and middle school. The question is about different school ...
banan3'14's user avatar
  • 379
8 votes
2 answers
13k views

When to use "Meter" vs "Metre"?

As noted in a comment discussion to Is “spaced by 1 meter” correct English: A: "[if] you are measuring in SI units and not using the size of your gas or electric meter as a unit of length, then ...
user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
1k views

Would you tell me more info about Minced and ground?

I would like to know some info about minced and ground. I think there's no big difference in meaning. I would like to know which one is commonly used in the USA? Can they both be used with the words ...
Michael George's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
12k views

What is difference between "with only" and "only with"?

For the following two sentences: "He can find out the solution of the problem only with the information about the fundamental theorem of calculus," and "He can find out the solution of the ...
Danny_Kim's user avatar
  • 479
0 votes
2 answers
301 views

lecture theater- an American expression?

Lecture theatre is a British expression, and I've noticed that Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary lists lecture theater as its American version: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,986
3 votes
2 answers
7k views

"Washing" and "laundry" are synonyms or a matter of UK and US English differences?

What are the cloths that gonna be washed or just right after washing called? Based on my naive dictionary there are 2 terms: "laundry" and "washing". But I would like to know if they are synonyms or ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
471 views

"There is no" or "There is no other" [duplicate]

There is no mountain in Myanmar as high as Mt. Everest. or There is no other mountain in Myanmar as high as Mt. Everest What are the differences in meaning between these two sentences?
Sun Htut Naung's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
108 views

adverb phrase and adjective phrase

After rollers, the invention was the wheel and axle. ( using "after" as an adverb phrase) The invention after rollers was the wheel and axle. (using "after" as adjective phrase) I want to know ...
Aung Thu's user avatar
  • 1,007
-1 votes
1 answer
108 views

To distinguish between American and British spelling [closed]

Words are :- theater, behavior , litre, dialogue , tire, program, omelette, cheque, pajamas, realize .
Deepti chauhan's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
702 views

What is this large mammal with antlers called: a moose or an elk?

Is it a moose or an elk in the picture attached? It's from this Wikipedia article. I've always called this animal an elk. Wiki says: The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia), Alces alces, is the ...
Yulia's user avatar
  • 2,850
0 votes
1 answer
5k views

Teenager or Adolescent?

I've heard a lot of people said that teenager and adolescent are the same, but I'm not 100% sure about that. As far as I know, teenagers are from 13 to 19 (because of the "-teen"), and adolescents are ...
Khanh Tran's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
6k views

"Optimiser" vs "optimizer"?

I have seen words which are spelled either with a "z" or with a "s" like "optimizer" and " optimiser". I thought that the ones with "z" are wrong but on searching the web I found that both are ...
Kirti's user avatar
  • 1,101
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Idiosyncracy or Idiosyncrasy?

Idiosyncracy is the way I've always spelt this, but 'idiosyncrasy' appears to be all but ubiquitous. Is this a UK-USA difference, or is the -cracy ending really incorrect?
user45959's user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
45k views

"On the test" or "in the test"?

I know we should say "on the test" meaning performance wise, but does using "in the test" go as well or has another meaning? Do we say: So the kids are able to do their best on the test. or ...
Yasmeenoz's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
6k views

When to use transfer and transferral?

Context: in university, some students transfer from one study programme to another. A manual has been written for them. Is it more natural to call it a "transfer manual" or a "transferral manual"? ...
AmberV's user avatar
  • 75
3 votes
1 answer
146 views

Would it sound strange to use the adverb "dreadfully" in (North)American English?

I was reading about "grading" and "non-grading" adverbs, came across with the adverb dreadfully. Surprisingly, I found that there are two sources mentioning the adverb as chiefly British [1], [2]. ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,015
6 votes
1 answer
566 views

"grey" vs "gray" are both common equally in use?

Yesterday I wrote "gray" in the meaning of the color, but my friend corrected me and told me to write "grey". Today I checked in the dictionary and I found that they are both correct for the same ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
7k views

How can I choose between "-se" and "-ce" for the spelling of the word ending pronounced /s/

How can I choose between "-se" and "-ce" for the spelling of the word ending pronounced /s/. For example, both "sense" and "science" have the ending pronounced /s/.
Aki's user avatar
  • 1,219