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Questions tagged [transatlantic-differences]

Questions about the differences between English as used in Britain and Ireland on one hand and Canada and the United States on the other.

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1answer
19 views

Gray or grey? I'm really not sure [closed]

Pretty self-explanatory (I know this is a common question). I'm not sure. Can someone help me out?
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1answer
46 views

“Huge” or “Enormous” preferable to use in academic writing? [closed]

I would like to know which one, huge or enormous, would be preferable to use in academic writing, such as in the following example: Overcoming the current cancer levels in the population is a ...
9
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3answers
4k views

Why the hood is also called bonnet?

...but where do you go to learn what is under the hood Trying to understand the operating system is unfortunately not as easy as just opening the bonnet So it seems like hood is equivalent to ...
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3answers
57 views

American equivalents of “repeat on” to describe food?

repeat verb 3 British [no object] (of food) be tasted intermittently for some time after being swallowed as a result of belching or indigestion. ‘that cucumber repeated on me for hours’ (...
0
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1answer
54 views

What is the difference between a class teacher and a form teacher?

I can't get which one, class teacher or form teacher or homeroom teacher, in the UK and the US, is what we call "professeur principal" in French secondary schools, meaning one of the teachers of a ...
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2answers
175 views

Some point “in future” or “in the future”

Using the is when we refer to something known to the reader or something specific. It is not clear to me how to deal with a word like future. Here is an example: They may get access to the book at ...
4
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1answer
58 views

play the guitar vs play guitar

I was taught that when we want to say "produce sound on a musical instrument", we should always use the definite article before the instrument ("play the guitar/piano/violin"). I did research on this,...
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2answers
315 views

What is the difference between secondary/grammar/primary/grade/etc. school? [closed]

There are some minor differences between primary, grade and elementary school, but let's forget them. The same goes for secondary, grammar and middle school. The question is about different school ...
7
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2answers
3k views

When to use “Meter” vs “Metre”?

As noted in a comment discussion to Is “spaced by 1 meter” correct English: A: "[if] you are measuring in SI units and not using the size of your gas or electric meter as a unit of length, then ...
14
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1answer
651 views

Would you tell me more info about Minced and ground?

I would like to know some info about minced and ground. I think there's no big difference in meaning. I would like to know which one is commonly used in the USA? Can they both be used with the words ...
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2answers
1k views

What is difference between “with only” and “only with”?

For the following two sentences: "He can find out the solution of the problem only with the information about the fundamental theorem of calculus," and "He can find out the solution of the ...
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2answers
79 views

lecture theater- an American expression?

Lecture theatre is a British expression, and I've noticed that Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary lists lecture theater as its American version: https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/...
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1answer
37 views

“Washing” and “laundry” are synonyms or a matter of UK and US English differences?

What are the cloths that gonna be washed or just right after washing called? Based on my naive dictionary there are 2 terms: "laundry" and "washing". But I would like to know if they are synonyms or ...
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1answer
42 views

“There is no” or “There is no other” [duplicate]

There is no mountain in Myanmar as high as Mt. Everest. or There is no other mountain in Myanmar as high as Mt. Everest What are the differences in meaning between these two sentences?
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1answer
94 views

adverb phrase and adjective phrase

After rollers, the invention was the wheel and axle. ( using "after" as an adverb phrase) The invention after rollers was the wheel and axle. (using "after" as adjective phrase) I want to know ...
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1answer
95 views

To distinguish between American and British spelling [closed]

Words are :- theater, behavior , litre, dialogue , tire, program, omelette, cheque, pajamas, realize .
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1answer
296 views

Teenager or Adolescent?

I've heard a lot of people said that teenager and adolescent are the same, but I'm not 100% sure about that. As far as I know, teenagers are from 13 to 19 (because of the "-teen"), and adolescents are ...
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2answers
2k views

“Optimiser” vs “optimizer”?

I have seen words which are spelled either with a "z" or with a "s" like "optimizer" and " optimiser". I thought that the ones with "z" are wrong but on searching the web I found that both are ...
2
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1answer
612 views

Idiosyncracy or Idiosyncrasy?

Idiosyncracy is the way I've always spelt this, but 'idiosyncrasy' appears to be all but ubiquitous. Is this a UK-USA difference, or is the -cracy ending really incorrect?
6
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5answers
9k views

“On the test” or “in the test”?

I know we should say "on the test" meaning performance wise, but does using "in the test" go as well or has another meaning? Do we say: So the kids are able to do their best on the test. or ...
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2answers
2k views

When to use transfer and transferral?

Context: in university, some students transfer from one study programme to another. A manual has been written for them. Is it more natural to call it a "transfer manual" or a "transferral manual"? ...
3
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1answer
89 views

Would it sound strange to use the adverb “dreadfully” in (North)American English?

I was reading about "grading" and "non-grading" adverbs, came across with the adverb dreadfully. Surprisingly, I found that there are two sources mentioning the adverb as chiefly British [1], [2]. ...
4
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1answer
241 views

“grey” vs “gray” are both common equally in use?

Yesterday I wrote "gray" in the meaning of the color, but my friend corrected me and told me to write "grey". Today I checked in the dictionary and I found that they are both correct for the same ...
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1answer
2k views

How can I choose between “-se” and “-ce” for the spelling of the word ending pronounced /s/

How can I choose between "-se" and "-ce" for the spelling of the word ending pronounced /s/. For example, both "sense" and "science" have the ending pronounced /s/.
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2answers
562 views

'-…ory' : Pronunciation difference between American and British English?

While listening to the OALD's pronunciations of prefatory, I wondered why the British pronunciation (ˈprɛfətrɪ, which resembles ♦pre-fah-trie) lacks the sound of the letter o, and thus seems less ...
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2answers
496 views

Language; math vs maths

I've heard of the term "maths" used by my UK friends, I am from the US and I use the word "math". Is "maths" grammatically correct? For me, it rolls off the tongue oddly; My maths teachers gave us ...
3
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2answers
801 views

American vs British pronunciation of `i`

Have you ever noticed that the American pronunciation of the letter i in various words is exactly "opposite" of the British way. Look at the following two word groups to understand what I mean... ...
2
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1answer
333 views

Usage of “look” followed by a noun

I came across a sentence like "The room looked a big mess." (Macmillan Dictionary) "That looks an interesting book." My understanding is that "look" of this usage comes with adjective and "look like" ...
0
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1answer
330 views

Difference between “outside” and “on the outside”

Is there any difference between the following sentences? I have coffee on the outside. It is referring to some coffee shop. I have coffee outside. Can anyone explain to me which of these ...
6
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5answers
77k views

What is the difference between “Gas” / “Petrol” / “Benzine” / “Gasoline”

I get always confused with that. What am I suppose to use for what and where (US English / UK English?) Example: I need "gas / petrol / benzine / gasoline" for my car.