Questions tagged [transitivity]

"Transitivity" is the number of Objects a verb takes. 'Intransitive' verbs take no Object; 'transitive verbs' take at least one Object; 'monotransitive' verbs take one Direct Object; and 'ditransitive' verbs take both a Direct Object and an Indirect Object. 'Ambitransitive' verbs may be either transitive or intransitive, and 'middle-voice' or 'labile' verbs may make an Object the Subject in the active voice

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Can I use "fail" as intransitive verb in the following way?

according to this source: "https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fail" a:to disappoint the expectations or trust of: her friends failed her b:to miss performing an expected service or ...
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Is "seep" just intransitive?

I was reading "Tunnels" and I found the next sentence: ...walls were caked with efflorescence and streaked with chalky lime scale where fissures had seeped moisture. I looked the word &...
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The difference between "…to {get, arrive, reach, come} here on time."

This is a B2 question taken from an old English test paper. The student has an original sentence and is given a new word which they must use to create a new sentence–using between two and five words–...
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The proper word for 'make it to wobble'

I'm trying to find a proper word for russian 'шатать' (to cause a wobble, to sway, to rock) in context of causing possible damage or instability due to unexpected movements. The literal meaning of the ...
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Whether the `v.` means both `vi.` and `vt.`?

Does the "v." in a dictionary mean both "vi." and "vt."? We know in dictionary, "vi." means intransitive verbs, and "vt." means "transitive verbs&...
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Can "trust" and "dismiss" be used without an object?

a. You are a bit too quick to dismiss. b. Do not be so quick to dismiss. c. You have a tendency to trust. d. You trust too much. Are the above sentences grammatically correct? I think 'dismiss' and '...
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Can coats button themselves? (Active vs. Passive)

While doing copywork today, I came across this sentence: Tall and well made, the men dressed in dark silk coats that buttoned down the sides of the chest and were elaborately embroidered in silver or ...
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"My room bulb blew out/fused" "How does candle blow out" [closed]

I think "My room bulb blew out/fused" is wrong. Shouldn't it be: "My room bulb has been blown/fused"? A bulb cannot blow or fuse itself. Doesn't it require an object to blow/fuse ...
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Can subjects be used as objects? [duplicate]

This robot is designed to play with. (The robot is designed for being played, so I can play with the robot.) This water is too hot to drink. (The water is too hot, so I cannot drink the water.) “Play ...
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throws 'noun' into, and throwing into 'noun'

I am wondering if there are alternatives to the classic throw 'noun' into, something that does not require that middle noun? Would this still work for ex : She stops, violently throwing into a pond ...
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Intransitive verb “throw.”

I found out “throw” can be intransitive, so can “I throw at the target” be used instead of “I throw the ball at the target”?
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Is it true that if an action verb or stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition it is intransitive?

"If an action verb or a stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition, it is intransitive." For example: I left for work. I was thinking about you.
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"So as to make difficult the test" or "So as to make the test difficult"

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. We changed the questions so as to make difficult the test. b. We changed the questions so as to make the test difficult. Or can one use (c) instead of (d)? c. We ...
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Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs?

Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs? I ask that because some prepositional verbs can become passive verbs and the “object of preposition” can become the “subject” of passive prepositional verb.
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Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs? I think I’m asking that probably because some transitive verb phrases goes before prepositions.
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Can gut be used transitively? [duplicate]

It gutted him to see her suffer like that. Can gut be used transitively like this? Or should I rephrase my sentence like this? It left him gutted to see her suffer like that. I looked up the word ...
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"complete" as an intransitive verb?

I came across this sentence somewhere: This dictionary took three years to complete. Clearly, it means '[...] took three years to be completed'. Is this sentence correct? And if so, how can the use ...
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Is this sentence meaningful?

Is this sentence correct? I felt the tea hot. Is felt or feel used like this?
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How does "sell out" work? How to understand it?

I find the phrasal verb "sell out" a bit confusing. Which is/are wrong? We're sold out. We're sold out of X. We sold out. We sold out of Y. Tickets have sold out. Tickets have been sold out....
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Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity

Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity? Is it causal English or not grammatical at all. thanks. I know it's correct to say "you wanna join me?...
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Can we really use lap as an intransitive verb?

She lapped with a flat tongue from top to bottom, over and over again lathering it with her saliva. I would personally say "lapped it with", but it seems we can use the verb as an ...
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When change is transitive and in which situations intransitive

I'm not sure when exactly the verb "change" can be passive or not. With googling, I figured out that it could not be passive when you are talking about a change happening in someone's ...
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"Object to" phrasal verb or not

He objected to the proposal. The above is a sentence to change into passive voice from a grammar book. The answer was also given. According to the Oxford dictionary, object is given as intransitive in ...
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Is the modal verb "can" transitive?

Are modal verbs, e.g. transitive or not?
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Difference between "Give up" and "Give up on"

I gave up the Chinese course. I found it too hard and decided to learn Italian instead. I gave up on the Chinese course. I found it too hard and decided to learn Italian instead. What is the ...
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To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold

TheFreeDictionary says about "convolute": intr. & tr.v. To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold in overlapping whorls. You can see that article here - convolute Can you explain to me why ...
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"electricity was suddenly turned off" or "electricity suddenly turned off"

Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity suddenly turned off The difference between "was turned off" and "turned off" Can I use present perfect progressive has been if "the electricity ...
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"I have been graduated from XYZ University in ABC-MSc" is correct?

graduate verb is intransitive and as far as I know, this sort of verbs couldn't be used as a passive form. Am I right? I have strangely seen it is correct in some website like this: https://answers....
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Difference between transitive and intransitive verb?

Please tell me if the verbs in the following sentences are transitive or intransitive? please give reason. caterpillar changes into butterfly. he got angry with his friends. they were told to keep ...
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Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless ..., have a professional check it.'

Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless the owner can present recent certification that the house is free of termites, have a professional check it.' I think this sentence is not right ...
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"The culture that/in which we inhabit..."

The culture that we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. The culture in which we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. Is ...
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Intransitive use of 'break' in "the record will break"

Is the following sentence correct? That the record will break today is probable. I found this sentence in a book. I think the sentence is wrong, because break is a transitive verb in this sense ...
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"broke his arm" vs. "his arm broke"

What is the correct sentence? He fell and broke his arm. He fell and his arm broke.
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James went to the campus cafe. Is went transitive or intransitive verb? campus cafe is direct object so it should be but it isn't. Why?

What I observe is campus cafe is a direct object, it receives the action, went is an action verb so it should be transitive. But here: http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/intransitiveverb.htm it says it ...
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Transitive/Intransitive Verbs in a sentence

I want to know which object (verbal transitivity) is coming first I gave her / the ball Or I gave the ball / to her I denied A piece of cake / to her ...
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“Tell me yourself” vs “tell me about yourself”

Tell me yourself. vs Tell me about yourself. Tell is a transitive verb and transitive verb needs a direct object. Here “me” is the indirect object and “yourself” is the direct object. I don't ...
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3 votes
3 answers
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Transitive verb + interrupter + object?

To what extent can someone interrupt a transitive verb and its object, and what is possible to use to make sure it has no mistakes either in grammar or meaning? For instance, look at this sentence: ...
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Talk about vs Talked about

As far as i know, Transitive verb can only become passive Well, Look at this example The mangers talked about the problem. The problem was talked about. As far as i am concerned, when ...
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grammars on "shoot me an email" vs "shoot me with an email"

According to several online pages, there are different grammatical interpretations of the structure of the phrase - shoot someone an email. To complicate it further, I've seen online a similar phrase "...
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Why the answer is "that" in "The area that the city now occupies..."?

Here is my test: The area ....... the city now occupies was originally swampland. A. that B. where C. on which D. on that I chose B, but the answer is A. Can you explain it to me?
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Finish doing something

I'll have dinner later after I've finished in the garden. Is that sentence grammatically correct? I have doubts about "finish in the the garden", the verb requires an object, doesn't it?
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Does "efficiently monetizing" sounds awkward? [closed]

I'm improving a website and hope someone could help me see if the sentence below has any problem. In particular, does "efficiently monetizing" sounds awkward? "It helps you acquire targeting users ...
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Why "be dealt cards" rather than "be dealing cards"?

I encounter such a confusing sentence: You are dealt two cards. I don't understand why we should use "dealt" rather than "dealing"(Present Progressive Tense) here? What is the normal tense of "...
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Using "wallow" verb with object

I see that wallow is an intransitive verb so it means that it should not be followed by an object. But if I use wallow as: Since that kid didn't get the ice-cream so she started wallowing on the ...
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"They seated themselves (?) either side of Harry"

In Harry Potter III, my attention was caught by the following construction: Hermione and Ron were looking daggers at each other, and when they got into class, they seated themselves either side ...
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3 answers
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*Flung* is Intransitive or Transitive?

The impact was such that the canine flung into the air and fell into a drain five meters away. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/noida/bike-rider-booked-for-dogs-death-in-greater-noida/...
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"Tom played Mary a joke." is not natural? [closed]

I think "Tom played Mary a joke." is not natural and "Tom played a joke on Mary." is natural. What is your opinion?
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5 votes
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Ask him (about) the price of the car

How can I explain to my younger brother (and more importantly, to myself) that it's OK to drop about in: Go ahead and ask the clerk (about) the price of the car. That it would be wrong to include ...
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How to differentiate between a transitive and intransitive verb?

My teacher told me that some verbs are transitive and they requires an object after them. She gave me a long list of transitive and intransitive verbs to learn. Can anyone give me the logic why a ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Is the transitive usage of "back off" common?

Both of them backed off their verbals, and eventual Indiana pledge Romeo Langford cut Louisville from his list of schools. (source) The meaning is clear, but I find the usage of "back off" as a ...
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