Questions tagged [transitivity]

"Transitivity" is the number of Objects a verb takes. 'Intransitive' verbs take no Object; 'transitive verbs' take at least one Object; 'monotransitive' verbs take one Direct Object; and 'ditransitive' verbs take both a Direct Object and an Indirect Object. 'Ambitransitive' verbs may be either transitive or intransitive, and 'middle-voice' or 'labile' verbs may make an Object the Subject in the active voice

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"speak English" vs "speak in English"

I don't get the chance to speak in English often. I've been told in doesn't need to be in this sentence, but does its inclusion make the sentence grammatically incorrect?
Soumya Ghosh's user avatar
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Why is "emerged" in "She emerged from the divorce a stronger person" marked only as intransitive but not as linking?

All dictionaries which mark their verbs with the labels: "transitive", "intransitive" and "linking", for some reason, don't write that the verb "emerge" has a ...
Loviii's user avatar
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Is "consist" really intransitive?

I recently learned that I cannot use “be consisted of” because it is intransitive verb. Example: Water consists of hydrogen and oxygen. (o) Water is consisted of hydrogen and oxygen. (x) Water is ...
윤민성's user avatar
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Why does the verb "TO LIKE" have to take an object in "yes-or-no answers", when there is no chance of confusion?

A: Do you like coffee? B: No I dont like. / Yes I like. We all know B's answer is wrong. Why? Because "TO LIKE" is a transitive verb and it needs an "IT" at the end. However, we ...
yunus's user avatar
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2 votes
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Can the verb "go" take an object (like a transitive verb)?

This is probably a simple question to answer (why or why not), but every answer I see about the verb "go" just says that it is transitive. For example, various websites say that "The ...
Curulian's user avatar
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14 votes
5 answers
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Why is it "you lied TO me" and not "you lied me"

Why do we say You tricked me You fooled me You deceived me You offended me You kissed me And so on and so on BUT you lied TO me and not you lied me?
user165427's user avatar
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Could "run late" and "run out of something" be transitive verbs

I know "run late" and "run out of something" are usually intransitive verbs. But could "run late" and "run out of something" be "transitive verbs"? ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
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Questions are raised or raise or rise?

They raised important questions concerning this problem. Important questions are raised concerning this problem. Important questions raise concerning this problem. I know that 1 and 2 are correct. ...
Sasan's user avatar
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What is the grammatical structure: "The dog licked the dish clean."

The dog licked the dish clean. Which rules of grammar does it follow? Can I interpret the sentence like 'The dish got clean due to dog's licking of the dish' ?
Sam's user avatar
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Understand the verb "provision" with/without an object in IT context

I came across a video about AWS in which the instructor said the following (extracted from its transcript): EC2 instances are virtual machines that you can provision with minimal friction to get up ...
catwith's user avatar
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Is it possible to use differentiate/change intransitively?

The company tried to differentiate to gain an advantage over the rivals. The company tried to change to gain an advantage over the rivals. I wonder if it's correct to use "differentiate" and ...
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distinguish - transitive or intransitive [closed]

Merriam-webster dictionary says that in: distinguish X from Y - distinguish is transitive distinguish between X and Y - distinguish is intransitive Do you agree? If it's true, what's the ...
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Can I use "fail" as intransitive verb in the following way?

according to this source: "https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fail" a:to disappoint the expectations or trust of: her friends failed her b:to miss performing an expected service or ...
henryke araudjo's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is "seep" just intransitive?

I was reading "Tunnels" and I found the next sentence: ...walls were caked with efflorescence and streaked with chalky lime scale where fissures had seeped moisture. I looked the word &...
Thunder05's user avatar
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3 votes
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The difference between "…to {get, arrive, reach, come} here on time."

This is a B2 question taken from an old English test paper. The student has an original sentence and is given a new word which they must use to create a new sentence–using between two and five words–...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
405 views

The proper word for 'make it to wobble'

I'm trying to find a proper word for russian 'шатать' (to cause a wobble, to sway, to rock) in context of causing possible damage or instability due to unexpected movements. The literal meaning of the ...
George Shuklin's user avatar
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781 views

Whether the `v.` means both `vi.` and `vt.`?

Does the "v." in a dictionary mean both "vi." and "vt."? We know in dictionary, "vi." means intransitive verbs, and "vt." means "transitive verbs&...
qg_java_17137's user avatar
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Can "trust" and "dismiss" be used without an object?

a. You are a bit too quick to dismiss. b. Do not be so quick to dismiss. c. You have a tendency to trust. d. You trust too much. Are the above sentences grammatically correct? I think 'dismiss' and '...
azz's user avatar
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Can coats button themselves? (Active vs. Passive)

While doing copywork today, I came across this sentence: Tall and well made, the men dressed in dark silk coats that buttoned down the sides of the chest and were elaborately embroidered in silver or ...
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"My room bulb blew out/fused" "How does candle blow out" [closed]

I think "My room bulb blew out/fused" is wrong. Shouldn't it be: "My room bulb has been blown/fused"? A bulb cannot blow or fuse itself. Doesn't it require an object to blow/fuse ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
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Can subjects be used as objects? [duplicate]

This robot is designed to play with. (The robot is designed for being played, so I can play with the robot.) This water is too hot to drink. (The water is too hot, so I cannot drink the water.) “Play ...
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throws 'noun' into, and throwing into 'noun'

I am wondering if there are alternatives to the classic throw 'noun' into, something that does not require that middle noun? Would this still work for ex : She stops, violently throwing into a pond ...
sp.'s user avatar
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Intransitive verb “throw.”

I found out “throw” can be intransitive, so can “I throw at the target” be used instead of “I throw the ball at the target”?
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1 answer
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Is it true that if an action verb or stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition it is intransitive?

"If an action verb or a stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition, it is intransitive." For example: I left for work. I was thinking about you.
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"So as to make difficult the test" or "So as to make the test difficult"

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. We changed the questions so as to make difficult the test. b. We changed the questions so as to make the test difficult. Or can one use (c) instead of (d)? c. We ...
azz's user avatar
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1 answer
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Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs?

Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs? I ask that because some prepositional verbs can become passive verbs and the “object of preposition” can become the “subject” of passive prepositional verb.
user6779864's user avatar
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1 answer
50 views

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs? I think I’m asking that probably because some transitive verb phrases goes before prepositions.
user6779864's user avatar
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Can gut be used transitively? [duplicate]

It gutted him to see her suffer like that. Can gut be used transitively like this? Or should I rephrase my sentence like this? It left him gutted to see her suffer like that. I looked up the word ...
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1 answer
250 views

"complete" as an intransitive verb?

I came across this sentence somewhere: This dictionary took three years to complete. Clearly, it means '[...] took three years to be completed'. Is this sentence correct? And if so, how can the use ...
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Is this sentence meaningful?

Is this sentence correct? I felt the tea hot. Is felt or feel used like this?
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1 answer
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How does "sell out" work? How to understand it?

I find the phrasal verb "sell out" a bit confusing. Which is/are wrong? We're sold out. We're sold out of X. We sold out. We sold out of Y. Tickets have sold out. Tickets have been sold out....
Vova's user avatar
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2 answers
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Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity

Is it right to say "you wanna join?" to invite someone to join me for the activity? Is it causal English or not grammatical at all. thanks. I know it's correct to say "you wanna join me?...
Kyle X's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
364 views

Can we really use lap as an intransitive verb?

She lapped with a flat tongue from top to bottom, over and over again lathering it with her saliva. I would personally say "lapped it with", but it seems we can use the verb as an ...
Sayaman's user avatar
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1 vote
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When change is transitive and in which situations intransitive

I'm not sure when exactly the verb "change" can be passive or not. With googling, I figured out that it could not be passive when you are talking about a change happening in someone's ...
Ghazal Yeg's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
387 views

"Object to" phrasal verb or not

He objected to the proposal. The above is a sentence to change into passive voice from a grammar book. The answer was also given. According to the Oxford dictionary, object is given as intransitive in ...
Chinnabatthina Siva Kumar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
393 views

Is the modal verb "can" transitive?

Are modal verbs, e.g. transitive or not?
rhymer1987's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
112 views

Difference between "Give up" and "Give up on"

I gave up the Chinese course. I found it too hard and decided to learn Italian instead. I gave up on the Chinese course. I found it too hard and decided to learn Italian instead. What is the ...
Louisr's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
70 views

To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold

TheFreeDictionary says about "convolute": intr. & tr.v. To coil or fold or cause to coil or fold in overlapping whorls. You can see that article here - convolute Can you explain to me why ...
ZWA's user avatar
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9 votes
4 answers
3k views

"electricity was suddenly turned off" or "electricity suddenly turned off"

Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity suddenly turned off The difference between "was turned off" and "turned off" Can I use present perfect progressive has been if "the electricity ...
kikillaa's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

"I have been graduated from XYZ University in ABC-MSc" is correct?

graduate verb is intransitive and as far as I know, this sort of verbs couldn't be used as a passive form. Am I right? I have strangely seen it is correct in some website like this: https://answers....
Ali Soltani's user avatar
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0 answers
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Difference between transitive and intransitive verb?

Please tell me if the verbs in the following sentences are transitive or intransitive? please give reason. caterpillar changes into butterfly. he got angry with his friends. they were told to keep ...
Learner's user avatar
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1 answer
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Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless ..., have a professional check it.'

Why did not delete the ‘it' in the sentence ' Unless the owner can present recent certification that the house is free of termites, have a professional check it.' I think this sentence is not right ...
Y. zeng's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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"The culture that/in which we inhabit..."

The culture that we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. The culture in which we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. Is ...
Devvie's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Intransitive use of 'break' in "the record will break"

Is the following sentence correct? That the record will break today is probable. I found this sentence in a book. I think the sentence is wrong, because break is a transitive verb in this sense ...
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3 answers
475 views

"broke his arm" vs. "his arm broke"

What is the correct sentence? He fell and broke his arm. He fell and his arm broke.
Afshin Pishehvar's user avatar
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1 answer
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James went to the campus cafe. Is went transitive or intransitive verb? campus cafe is direct object so it should be but it isn't. Why?

What I observe is campus cafe is a direct object, it receives the action, went is an action verb so it should be transitive. But here: http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/intransitiveverb.htm it says it ...
J.Smith's user avatar
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Transitive/Intransitive Verbs in a sentence

I want to know which object (verbal transitivity) is coming first I gave her / the ball Or I gave the ball / to her I denied A piece of cake / to her ...
Thinking Boi's user avatar
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1 answer
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“Tell me yourself” vs “tell me about yourself”

Tell me yourself. vs Tell me about yourself. Tell is a transitive verb and transitive verb needs a direct object. Here “me” is the indirect object and “yourself” is the direct object. I don't ...
Aiman Khan's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
400 views

Transitive verb + interrupter + object?

To what extent can someone interrupt a transitive verb and its object, and what is possible to use to make sure it has no mistakes either in grammar or meaning? For instance, look at this sentence: ...
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
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Talk about vs Talked about

As far as i know, Transitive verb can only become passive Well, Look at this example The mangers talked about the problem. The problem was talked about. As far as i am concerned, when ...
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
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