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Questions tagged [transitivity]

"Transitivity" is the number of Objects a verb takes. 'Intransitive' verbs take no Object; 'transitive verbs' take at least one Object; 'monotransitive' verbs take one Direct Object; and 'ditransitive' verbs take both a Direct Object and an Indirect Object. 'Ambitransitive' verbs may be either transitive or intransitive, and 'middle-voice' or 'labile' verbs may make an Object the Subject in the active voice

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"inform" as an intransitive verb?

He just wants to inform. I am just informing. She sometimes informs wrongly. "Inform" is a transitive verb. (Source) But in the above sentences "inform" is used as an intransitive verb. Is such ...
1 vote
3 answers
95 views

Is "fasten" transitive or intransitive in the sentence "He rose, his eyes still fastened on the piece of paper."?

Longman Online Dictionary gives out the following example sentence: He rose, his eyes still fastened on the piece of paper. Source: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fasten-your-eyes-gaze-on-...
3 votes
1 answer
71 views

Are there any "ditransitive" ergative verbs in English?

By ergative I mean verbs that can undergo alteration such that the object becomes the subject (reducing the number of arguments by one). E.g. She broke the vase. -> The vase broke. Are there ...
0 votes
0 answers
73 views

How to know why some transitive phrasal verbs cannot be split

What is the reason that some transitive phrasal verbs with adverb particles cannot be split? Examples: 'My brother looks after my mother.' Likewise, come across, count on, and such are other ...
5 votes
3 answers
3k views

Can "He is an honest man" be passivized?

My friend says that the sentence He is an honest man can be passivized. My English friends and I are saying that the sentence can’t be passivized since the verb is intransitive and there is no object ...
2 votes
1 answer
342 views

Can I use repeat as intransitive verb?

Okay I give up! The original sentence was this from my writing: "Now that you have read the insights, in order to move on to the future, you would be better off if you now leave them behind. ...
3 votes
2 answers
144 views

Is "bother" an ergative verb?

I have this list for comparing verbs for their being ergative or not. As you see, bother is not on that list. But I have sentences in which that verb seems to be ergative. For example: She may bother ...
1 vote
1 answer
99 views

Can 'eliminate' be used as intransitive verb?

I know the verb 'eliminate' is used only as a transitive verb. However, I have read some articles which use the verb as an intransitive verb, without any objects. For example, Your dog should find a ...
1 vote
2 answers
283 views

Can all transitive verbs take to-infinitive clauses?

“Yet it would be your duty to bear it, if you could not avoid it: it is weak and silly to say you cannot bear what it is your fate to be required to bear. (Jane Eyre) It seems ‘your fate to be ...
4 votes
2 answers
658 views

"speak English" vs "speak in English"

I don't get the chance to speak in English often. I've been told in doesn't need to be in this sentence, but does its inclusion make the sentence grammatically incorrect?
-1 votes
1 answer
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Why is "emerged" in "She emerged from the divorce a stronger person" marked only as intransitive but not as linking?

All dictionaries which mark their verbs with the labels: "transitive", "intransitive" and "linking", for some reason, don't write that the verb "emerge" has a ...
1 vote
1 answer
131 views

Is "consist" really intransitive?

I recently learned that I cannot use “be consisted of” because it is intransitive verb. Example: Water consists of hydrogen and oxygen. (o) Water is consisted of hydrogen and oxygen. (x) Water is ...
0 votes
0 answers
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Why does the verb "TO LIKE" have to take an object in "yes-or-no answers", when there is no chance of confusion?

A: Do you like coffee? B: No I dont like. / Yes I like. We all know B's answer is wrong. Why? Because "TO LIKE" is a transitive verb and it needs an "IT" at the end. However, we ...
2 votes
1 answer
528 views

Can the verb "go" take an object (like a transitive verb)?

This is probably a simple question to answer (why or why not), but every answer I see about the verb "go" just says that it is transitive. For example, various websites say that "The ...
14 votes
5 answers
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Why is it "you lied TO me" and not "you lied me"

Why do we say You tricked me You fooled me You deceived me You offended me You kissed me And so on and so on BUT you lied TO me and not you lied me?
1 vote
1 answer
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Why the answer is "that" in "The area that the city now occupies..."?

Here is my test: The area ....... the city now occupies was originally swampland. A. that B. where C. on which D. on that I chose B, but the answer is A. Can you explain it to me?
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1 answer
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Could "run late" and "run out of something" be transitive verbs

I know "run late" and "run out of something" are usually intransitive verbs. But could "run late" and "run out of something" be "transitive verbs"? ...
0 votes
1 answer
248 views

Questions are raised or raise or rise?

They raised important questions concerning this problem. Important questions are raised concerning this problem. Important questions raise concerning this problem. I know that 1 and 2 are correct. ...
1 vote
2 answers
70 views

What is the grammatical structure: "The dog licked the dish clean."

The dog licked the dish clean. Which rules of grammar does it follow? Can I interpret the sentence like 'The dish got clean due to dog's licking of the dish' ?
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1 answer
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Understand the verb "provision" with/without an object in IT context

I came across a video about AWS in which the instructor said the following (extracted from its transcript): EC2 instances are virtual machines that you can provision with minimal friction to get up ...
0 votes
2 answers
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Is it possible to use differentiate/change intransitively?

The company tried to differentiate to gain an advantage over the rivals. The company tried to change to gain an advantage over the rivals. I wonder if it's correct to use "differentiate" and ...
-2 votes
1 answer
48 views

distinguish - transitive or intransitive [closed]

Merriam-webster dictionary says that in: distinguish X from Y - distinguish is transitive distinguish between X and Y - distinguish is intransitive Do you agree? If it's true, what's the ...
0 votes
1 answer
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Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs? I think I’m asking that probably because some transitive verb phrases goes before prepositions.
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1 answer
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Is this sentence meaningful?

Is this sentence correct? I felt the tea hot. Is felt or feel used like this?
-1 votes
1 answer
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Can I use "fail" as intransitive verb in the following way?

according to this source: "https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fail" a:to disappoint the expectations or trust of: her friends failed her b:to miss performing an expected service or ...
0 votes
1 answer
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Is "seep" just intransitive?

I was reading "Tunnels" and I found the next sentence: ...walls were caked with efflorescence and streaked with chalky lime scale where fissures had seeped moisture. I looked the word &...
3 votes
2 answers
2k views

The difference between "…to {get, arrive, reach, come} here on time."

This is a B2 question taken from an old English test paper. The student has an original sentence and is given a new word which they must use to create a new sentence–using between two and five words–...
0 votes
2 answers
511 views

How to differentiate between a transitive and intransitive verb?

My teacher told me that some verbs are transitive and they requires an object after them. She gave me a long list of transitive and intransitive verbs to learn. Can anyone give me the logic why a ...
2 votes
3 answers
422 views

The proper word for 'make it to wobble'

I'm trying to find a proper word for russian 'шатать' (to cause a wobble, to sway, to rock) in context of causing possible damage or instability due to unexpected movements. The literal meaning of the ...
0 votes
0 answers
1k views

Whether the `v.` means both `vi.` and `vt.`?

Does the "v." in a dictionary mean both "vi." and "vt."? We know in dictionary, "vi." means intransitive verbs, and "vt." means "transitive verbs&...
0 votes
0 answers
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Can "trust" and "dismiss" be used without an object?

a. You are a bit too quick to dismiss. b. Do not be so quick to dismiss. c. You have a tendency to trust. d. You trust too much. Are the above sentences grammatically correct? I think 'dismiss' and '...
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

Can coats button themselves? (Active vs. Passive)

While doing copywork today, I came across this sentence: Tall and well made, the men dressed in dark silk coats that buttoned down the sides of the chest and were elaborately embroidered in silver or ...
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is 'dream' a transitive verb or intransitive verb?

I dream of winning a gold medal in next Olympics. Is the verb – dream – in this sentence transitive or intransitive? If it happens to be transitive, how can we passivize the sentence? I ...
-1 votes
2 answers
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"My room bulb blew out/fused" "How does candle blow out" [closed]

I think "My room bulb blew out/fused" is wrong. Shouldn't it be: "My room bulb has been blown/fused"? A bulb cannot blow or fuse itself. Doesn't it require an object to blow/fuse ...
2 votes
1 answer
4k views

Passive construction(for infinitive verb)

1 Active voice: He expects me to help him. Passive(book answer): He expects to be helped by me. Passive(my answer): It is expected by him that i should help him. passive(my answer): It is expected by ...
1 vote
1 answer
66 views

When change is transitive and in which situations intransitive

I'm not sure when exactly the verb "change" can be passive or not. With googling, I figured out that it could not be passive when you are talking about a change happening in someone's ...
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

'Agree terms' or 'Agree TO terms'?

I have had a disagreement with a teacher over the correct structure of a sentence. My teacher said that the sentence "...and if they agree terms, they will have a deal." is correct. However, this ...
0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Can subjects be used as objects? [duplicate]

This robot is designed to play with. (The robot is designed for being played, so I can play with the robot.) This water is too hot to drink. (The water is too hot, so I cannot drink the water.) “Play ...
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

When do we use tell+infinitive with to ? (Not tell + object + to)

I'm looking for an example of using 'tell + infinitive with to'. My book said 'tell' can be used with infinitive to, but didn't give me an example. I think that it generally comes 'tell+object+...
0 votes
2 answers
19 views

throws 'noun' into, and throwing into 'noun'

I am wondering if there are alternatives to the classic throw 'noun' into, something that does not require that middle noun? Would this still work for ex : She stops, violently throwing into a pond ...
3 votes
3 answers
216 views

The intransitive word "disagree"

The word "disagree" is intransitive so why in this sentence It is unusual for you and Tom to disagree" is there no "with" or "upon" to follow it? Is its meaning the same as "It is unusual for you ...
12 votes
1 answer
113k views

Consult VS Consult with

Can you guys help me out with the correct usage of "To consult"? Very often, I've seen people using "to consult with someone or something." If you could please give me some examples, that would be ...
3 votes
2 answers
5k views

"see the example below for understanding" versus "see the example below to understand"

Which sentence would sound more natural? Are both of them grammatically correct? Which do you think is more correct? See the example below for understanding how it works. See the example below to ...
0 votes
0 answers
166 views

Intransitive verb “throw.”

I found out “throw” can be intransitive, so can “I throw at the target” be used instead of “I throw the ball at the target”?
0 votes
1 answer
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Is it true that if an action verb or stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition it is intransitive?

"If an action verb or a stative verb is immediately followed by a preposition, it is intransitive." For example: I left for work. I was thinking about you.
12 votes
2 answers
142k views

"Reply him" or "reply to him"

I always say sentences like "Reply him that you will deliver the report later". A friend of mine who is rather particular about English grammar says it should be "Reply to him that [...]". Is this ...
2 votes
1 answer
16k views

"In order to help serve you better..."

This sentence is from a Japanese book for English language learners. It's a transcript of a public announcement recording. I was asked whether the sentence is correct. I am not a native speaker and ...
0 votes
2 answers
39 views

"So as to make difficult the test" or "So as to make the test difficult"

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. We changed the questions so as to make difficult the test. b. We changed the questions so as to make the test difficult. Or can one use (c) instead of (d)? c. We ...
1 vote
1 answer
243 views

Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs?

Are prepositional verbs transitive verbs? I ask that because some prepositional verbs can become passive verbs and the “object of preposition” can become the “subject” of passive prepositional verb.
1 vote
2 answers
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Transitive verbs VS intransitive verbs

As per my knowledge: A transitive verb takes a direct object. Some examples: I watched a movie. He played cricket. An intransitive verb does not take a direct object. Some examples: ...

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