Questions tagged [transitivity]

"Transitivity" is the number of Objects a verb takes. 'Intransitive' verbs take no Object; 'transitive verbs' take at least one Object; 'monotransitive' verbs take one Direct Object; and 'ditransitive' verbs take both a Direct Object and an Indirect Object. 'Ambitransitive' verbs may be either transitive or intransitive, and 'middle-voice' or 'labile' verbs may make an Object the Subject in the active voice

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Flee from vs flee

Look at the following sentences. Many people fled the city to escape the fighting. Refugees fled from the city. They fled the country in 1987. The family fled from Nazi Germany to Britain ...
I don't know who I am.'s user avatar
14 votes
5 answers
8k views

Why is it "you lied TO me" and not "you lied me"

Why do we say You tricked me You fooled me You deceived me You offended me You kissed me And so on and so on BUT you lied TO me and not you lied me?
user165427's user avatar
13 votes
3 answers
6k views

Can I rephrase the sentence "Can you explain this word to me?" into "Can you explain me this word."

Can you explain this word to me? Can I rephrase it as Can you explain me this word?
user48070's user avatar
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12 votes
1 answer
110k views

Consult VS Consult with

Can you guys help me out with the correct usage of "To consult"? Very often, I've seen people using "to consult with someone or something." If you could please give me some examples, that would be ...
Themacdaddynyc's user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
4k views

Why "be dealt cards" rather than "be dealing cards"?

I encounter such a confusing sentence: You are dealt two cards. I don't understand why we should use "dealt" rather than "dealing"(Present Progressive Tense) here? What is the normal tense of "...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
1k views

Do I need to use "of"

My mother finally approved of our plan. My mother finally approved our plan. My parents approved of my marrying girl. My parents approved my marrying girl. Do I need to use "of" or can be ...
JN Raju's user avatar
  • 439
10 votes
4 answers
2k views

Is "A Star Shoots" a complete sentence?

A star shoots. I read something like this somewhere. Can this be thought of as a complete sentence? How does one analyze this, grammatically? It looks as though it is missing some phrase. On the ...
saySay's user avatar
  • 1,586
9 votes
4 answers
4k views

"electricity was suddenly turned off" or "electricity suddenly turned off"

Randall has been writing his paper when the electricity suddenly turned off The difference between "was turned off" and "turned off" Can I use present perfect progressive has been if "the electricity ...
kikillaa's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
136k views

"Reply him" or "reply to him"

I always say sentences like "Reply him that you will deliver the report later". A friend of mine who is rather particular about English grammar says it should be "Reply to him that [...]". Is this ...
ADTC's user avatar
  • 233
9 votes
3 answers
49k views

Why Listen to Music, why not Listening Music

Maximum time I face this problem by saying listening music. Is there any traditional cause behind this? Can we use listen music or listening music? Seems there is only a slight difference, but why ...
Ranjit's user avatar
  • 201
9 votes
5 answers
4k views

Why do people say "explain to me", not "explain me"? [duplicate]

Is there any grammatical rule to know which verbs can (or better, must) be sometimes followed by "to"? Some examples are: Please explain to me why... She said to me that... I'm aware I could also ...
claudio sepulveda's user avatar
7 votes
5 answers
5k views

What is the meaning of ''cry oneself"?

I came across this phrase/these words while reading a novel. What does it mean? Like If I say : I cried myself. I wanted to cry myself. Does it mean crying over oneself? I mean crying over ...
Saqeeb's user avatar
  • 854
6 votes
2 answers
4k views

"talk money" or "talk about money"

Let's talk money. It's from an American show: Friends(Season02 Episode03), Usually, I would say "Let's talk about money, but why did she omit the word "about"?
Searene's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
17k views

"has not sold" vs. "didn't sell"

I got this email from a colleague: I am writing because product #55 has not sold and we would like to expand the list... Is this the right sentence structure or should it be written: I am ...
mql4beginner's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Ask him (about) the price of the car

How can I explain to my younger brother (and more importantly, to myself) that it's OK to drop about in: Go ahead and ask the clerk (about) the price of the car. That it would be wrong to include ...
Sara's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
890 views

In "Approval was given, and Ju's art displayed." how can the transitive verb 'display' be used without an object?

I have read a sentence like that from a magazine: "Approval was given, and Ju's art displayed." Since the word display is a transitive verb, how can it be used like this without an object?
teraphim's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
28k views

Should I say 'find...interesting' or 'find...to be interesting'?

In the sentence I find Area 51 interesting because there is so little information about it. Shall I add 'to be' before 'interesting'?
Rescy_'s user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
388 views

passed both -- meaning?

Source: US Congress passes Russia sanctions, arms for Ukraine Usage example with a context: Identical texts of the Ukraine Freedom Support Act passed both the Senate and House of ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

I stretch after waking up

I have seen this question in an article: Why do we stretch after waking up? Consider the following sentences: We stretch after waking up I stretch after waking up I (Subject) | stretch (Verb) | ...
user73963's user avatar
  • 1,377
5 votes
3 answers
13k views

What is the difference between “refer the letter” and “refer to the letter”?

I’m asking about usage of “refer” and “refer to”. Can one say “refer to the letter”? Is “refer the letter” enough?
Pradeep's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
131 views

Transitivity of "to map" in mathematical nomenclature

Is "to map" a transitive verb, so that I can say "a mapping b" (a related with b), or an intransitive verb, so that I can say "a mapping with b" or "a is mapped with b" or "a mapping to b"?
user1641513's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is "V-ing of something" structure always possible?

I just have read an article of gerund on Grammar girl and started to wonder. Can transitive verbs always have gerund form followed by "of objective" ? As shown on the site, they defuse the bomb. ...
JBL's user avatar
  • 728
4 votes
4 answers
2k views

"Tom played Mary a joke." is not natural? [closed]

I think "Tom played Mary a joke." is not natural and "Tom played a joke on Mary." is natural. What is your opinion?
Fellix's user avatar
  • 351
4 votes
2 answers
834 views

“Pharaoh was thought he was divine”

The funerals of Egyptian rulers were spectacular – while in Mesopotamia kings were regarded as the servants of the gods, in Egypt the pharaoh was thought he was divine. One of the highlighted parts ...
bart-leby's user avatar
  • 8,633
4 votes
2 answers
632 views

"speak English" vs "speak in English"

I don't get the chance to speak in English often. I've been told in doesn't need to be in this sentence, but does its inclusion make the sentence grammatically incorrect?
Soumya Ghosh's user avatar
  • 1,473
4 votes
3 answers
94k views

"Proposed her" vs. "proposed to her"

I get confused sometimes because I read both phrases(proposed her or proposed to her). So, please let me know, which one is correct? I proposed to her. vs. I proposed her.
user62015's user avatar
  • 3,987
4 votes
6 answers
5k views

Is "I have got a pencil" appropriate here?

A teacher passed out pencils to all the students in the class and said, "Has everyone got a pencil?" The students answered, (a) I have a pencil. (b) I have got a pencil. (c) I have one ...
user73963's user avatar
  • 1,377
4 votes
1 answer
5k views

Which one is correct. I oppose to taking a drug or I'm opposed to taking a drug?

Which is the correct sentence? 1)I oppose to taking a drug. 2)I'm opposed to taking a drug. I have a problem in understanding the 2nd one. "I'm opposed" makes sense when there is another subject ...
Gt_R's user avatar
  • 823
4 votes
3 answers
3k views

How to use separable three-word phrasal verbs with the object is a pronoun

I found something on this webpage: “get back from” is stated to be either: Inseparable, meaning return from somewhere, or Separable, meaning receive something originally lent to another person....
nkm's user avatar
  • 2,463
4 votes
2 answers
12k views

Is it correct to end a sentence with “I thought to myself”?

I was reading a novel and a sentence in the novel did not sound correct to me. Please check and let me know if it sounds normal or not. If it is correct, then please let me know what it means. From ...
user62015's user avatar
  • 3,987
4 votes
1 answer
328 views

Why didn't they use the passive form in the following sentence?

I was studying the past continuous in "Grammar in Use, Cambridge University Press" and I saw a sentence that is strange for me: I was doing something: I was in the middle of doing something at a ...
BugHunter's user avatar
  • 145
4 votes
1 answer
132 views

What did Obama mean when he said "we've surged intelligence-sharing"?

Last week, US president Barack Obama said: Third, we’re working with friends and allies to stop ISIL’s operations -- to disrupt plots, cut off their financing, and prevent them from recruiting more ...
Hugo's user avatar
  • 927
4 votes
2 answers
9k views

Which one of the following is a correct grammatical conclusion?

I am practicing independent writing for TOEFL iBT test. I have read a passage which says that universities should focus more on research. I also have a listing in which the lecturer believes that ...
Marco Dinatsoli's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
252 views

Standardness Of "Try Back"

Suppose John went to some office building and inquired with the receptionist about someone that worked there, and that someone happened to be away at that moment. Then John said to the receptionist: ...
meatie's user avatar
  • 7,565
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

"prize awarded him" vs. "prize awarded to him"

The verb award is ditransitive, Oxford Dictionary says: 1. [with two objects] Give or order the giving of (something) as an official payment, compensation, or prize to (someone) ‘The ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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4 votes
4 answers
10k views

What is the difference between "disapprove" and "disapprove of"?

Does adding "of" makes any difference in the sentences? For example: He disapproved of people marrying more than once. Can't I write in following way? He disapproved the people... Another ...
Vikas's user avatar
  • 525
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Verbs that can be changed into passive contruction?

A transitive verb that expresses an action can be transformed into passive construction. For example, "The boys carried the piano into the house" can be revised into "The piano was carried by the boys ...
April's user avatar
  • 2,993
3 votes
3 answers
404 views

Transitive verb + interrupter + object?

To what extent can someone interrupt a transitive verb and its object, and what is possible to use to make sure it has no mistakes either in grammar or meaning? For instance, look at this sentence: ...
Bavyan Yaldo's user avatar
  • 3,037
3 votes
1 answer
293 views

Changing subjects in a sentence: treated to, adsorbed with?

Can I change the first sentence to the following sentence? 1) The cells were treated with enzyme A. -> The enzyme A was treated to the cells. 2) The protein was adsorbed to the nanoparticle. -> The ...
Cdk270's user avatar
  • 121
3 votes
3 answers
2k views

"The tea is hot" - Is the verb BE transitive or not here?

I came across a question: Whether this sentence is transitive or not.. The tea is hot. According to me, it should be transitive. The tea is (what?) Please explain.
Manav Bansal's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Doesn't… (negative), but…. (short positive)

I've just learned a very basic way of shortening sentences: He likes tea (positive), but she doesn't (short negative). I haven't got a car (negative), but my sister has (short positive). But, what ...
viery365's user avatar
  • 681
3 votes
3 answers
7k views

You also can reach us easily Or You also can reach TO us easily

"You also can reach us easily" "You also can reach to us easily" Using the "to" would be grammatical? Added : When we ask them to email us or call us - "You also can reach (to) us easily by [email] ...
arm's user avatar
  • 535
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

The difference between "…to {get, arrive, reach, come} here on time."

This is a B2 question taken from an old English test paper. The student has an original sentence and is given a new word which they must use to create a new sentence–using between two and five words–...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 26.2k
3 votes
2 answers
142 views

Is "bother" an ergative verb?

I have this list for comparing verbs for their being ergative or not. As you see, bother is not on that list. But I have sentences in which that verb seems to be ergative. For example: She may bother ...
Abbasi's user avatar
  • 649
3 votes
1 answer
2k views

Can Intransitive verbs such as "arrive" take objects?

I am learning English grammar. I am not a beginner and I am following an English grammar book to improve my grammar. The book gives some examples of intransitive verbs (verbs that don't take any ...
Waheed Khan's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is "drive a road" grammatical?

I read somewhere When driving a 2 lane road for a long period of time with very few places to pass other vehicles, a line of cars tends to develop behind the “slow” vehicle. When using the verb "...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
9k views

grammars on "shoot me an email" vs "shoot me with an email"

According to several online pages, there are different grammatical interpretations of the structure of the phrase - shoot someone an email. To complicate it further, I've seen online a similar phrase "...
B Chen's user avatar
  • 1,216
3 votes
1 answer
158 views

"They seated themselves (?) either side of Harry"

In Harry Potter III, my attention was caught by the following construction: Hermione and Ron were looking daggers at each other, and when they got into class, they seated themselves either side ...
user74785's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is 'dream' a transitive verb or intransitive verb?

I dream of winning a gold medal in next Olympics. Is the verb – dream – in this sentence transitive or intransitive? If it happens to be transitive, how can we passivize the sentence? I ...
Syam Kumar. V's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
781 views

Can the verb 'release' be used as an intransitive verb?

Volkheimer leaps immediately into a squat, his head coming around as the hounds release toward him, and Werner’s heart feels as if it has been blown to pieces in his chest. Volkheimer’s arms come ...
whitecap's user avatar
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