Questions tagged [translation]

This tag is for question about determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages.

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13
votes
7answers
5k views

How do you say “enchufado” in English?

"Enchufado" or "enchufe" is a colloquial way of saying that a person got a job because a friend or relative gave it to him, instead of earning it themselves. I thought about the word "appointed" but ...
15
votes
9answers
7k views

An appropriate term for an overly by-the-rules person

In Swedish, we've got a term that loosely translates as paragraph jockey. It refers to a person, often a clerk or a referee, who is following all the rules, prescriptions and agreements ad absurdum. ...
33
votes
14answers
9k views

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying “It's another pair of sleeves”?

In a meeting an Italian told a puzzled English audience: "It's another pair of sleeves". It's an Italian way of saying: "it's another thing", or "this new argument is something different or off topic"...
22
votes
8answers
12k views

English equivalent of “garam” (warming) food?

I want to know how we say in English when we want to say that almonds or other dry fruits are "hot" for our body. I am an Indian, and in India, we use the word garam which literally means hot in ...
2
votes
1answer
11k views

Meaning of expression “ blanket rationale ”

I strongly agree with this point, and don't buy the blanket rationale that speed trumps everything in a startup. I couldn't find its meaning anywhere, what does blanket rationale mean?
9
votes
3answers
664 views

What is a not-cut-in/printed index called?

There are thumb indexes, also called a cut-in indexes (see also the images at Daumenregister). In contrast to this, there are also not-cut-in-indexes (that is, they are only printed, and leave a mark ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

English translation of Spanish imperfect tenses

I'm confused because my first language (Spanish) has imperfect and perfect tenses that don't exist in English. How do you know which English tense to use? Here's an example taken from the first ...
4
votes
1answer
118 views

putting feet on the donkey!

I'm translating the subtitle of a documentary about the artist "David Hockney" by B.B.C and someone says at about minute 9: "And he said this guy was just like this on his thing, and sort of ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

What do you call the pages at the end of a book(children books) that you can “break down”

Im a spanish speaker I do not know how to properly call this kind of "pages". The pages and the end of a children books that are meant to play or have figures for children to cut. In spanish we call ...
14
votes
4answers
9k views

English equivalent of French “quiproquo”

In English, quid pro quo refers to a barter-style exchange. I'll do this for you and you'll do something for me. There is this quote from the movie The Silence of the Lambs(1991) where Dr Lecter says: ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Which one do you call “pepper”, pimienta o pimiento?

So I always thought pepper was the english equivalent of the spanish word pimienta But now I look the translation for pimiento and it also returns pepper (Google Translator) Do you call both ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

English equivalent of French “quiproquo” (bis)

This question is related to this one and this other one, both regarding the same matter but from distinct points of view. After reading the above posts I remained unsatisfied because of what I see ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

What would be the equivalent of “Grundlagen” from German in a scientific paper?

I am required to make the first chapter of my scientific paper be called "Einleitung" in German, that would be "Introduction" in English, but the second one should be "Grundlagen", which I can't find ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Looking for an English equivalent to the following Spanish term [duplicate]

The term "paga fantas" is a person who does whatever it takes to gain a girl's approval, in hope that upon paying for a girl's drinks, doing her favors, carrying her bag/purse/handbag, listening to ...