Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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Is the noun "time" always uncountable?

such long time such a long time I know that (time) is an uncountable noun but I'm a bit confused because I heard many people saying such a long time so which of them is correct?
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3 answers
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This is mashed potatoes or These are mashed potatoes

This question arose in the discussion of a language learning app. Its original sentence is in Russian and it says Это пюре а вот пицца. The translation from the app is This is mashed potatoes and ...
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I had a hard time vs I had hard times

I always don't understand how I can count time. In what situation can I use "a hard/good time" or "hard/good times"? Could you please show me examples of sentences, or explanations ...
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in the sentence "there is 2 litres of milk" is 2 litres countable or uncountable?

Is "2 litres" in the above sentence a countable noun? I have had mixed answers for this question. Some say yes, and some, no. I have read articles, but none give me any clear answer. ...
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Is the word "foods" countable or uncountable?

Sentence: Whole foods means food that's in its original form, straight from nature, typically whole fruits, veggies, whole grains, et cetera. I want to know why "means" not "mean" ...
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Should I use prices in the following sentence

The prices of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. or The price of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. Or if both are correct and it's ...
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Is it correct to use ''scores of (something)'' with uncountable nouns?

''Score of something'' means ''a lot of something.'' Although it is correct to use ''a lot of'' with uncountable nouns, I've never seen an example of ''scores of something'' used with an uncountable ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Is "fruit" used as a countable or uncountable noun?

I don't know if "fruit" works as a singular or a plural in these cases: HOW MANY fruit(s) or HOW MUCH fruit do you eat a day? Today I have had three fruit(s).
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Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? [closed]

Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? I mean, are there any English words that mean ‘substance or object’? If so, should I use an indefinite article, or not?
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6 votes
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The list of uncountable nouns that never take 'a/an'

There is a rule not use the article ‘a’ with uncountable nouns. Unless, we talk about a particular kind of the uncountable noun. For example, ‘a dreadful anger’, ‘a fragile calm’, ‘a great enthusiasm’ ...
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Name is countable or uncountable?

Let's say I'm writing a story and there's a character named Jim and he sees 10 identical people who have similarities with his friend Emily, in fact, they look exactly like Emily. What would Jim ...
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"merit": countable vs uncountable

The word "merit" seems to be used as both countable and uncountable, in both single and plural forms: "there is no much merit" — 23k results "the claim has no merit" — ...
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Is an adjective make uncountable noun countable?

I've mentioned in the previous question a few days ago that advice is an uncountable noun. I've seen when the noun is attached with an adjective beside it, there are some that have article a and some ...
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2 votes
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has good reason vs has a good reason

Tom has good reason to be angry. Tom may well be angry. My textbook says that the above two sentences are the same. What is the meaning of "reason" above?
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You can buy these from the supermarket. / ...supermarkets

Question: Where can I buy these cakes? Answer 1-You can buy these from the supermarket. (to refer to any supermarkets) Answer 2-You can buy these from supermarkets. I think that we can say ".........
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Is an uncountable noun treated as a singular noun?

For example, if a banana is mostly rotten, I can describe it just as ‘a banana is rotten.’ Water gets frozen from the top. If the water is mostly frozen (not in degree, but in amount), can I describe ...
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5 votes
2 answers
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Using "a" with the word "slang"

Can I use the word "slang" with an indefinite article "a"? For example: That phrase is an obvious slang. or That choice of words is an obvious slang.
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Error Detection in noun [duplicate]

I am confused in this sentence : There are two scores of books (A) / which are lying (B) / unused in the library (C) / no error (D). The answer is part (A) and error is mentioned as scores. I am ...
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I am working as a consultant in a/in/in the corporate sector?

I am working as a consultant in a/in/in the corporate sector? Which one is right? what does the sentence mean with articles and without articles? can the corporate sector be an uncountable noun? And ...
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Uncountable noun 1 OR Uncountable 2 ARE/IS

I have just read the following: These design rules play an important role, and reworking or enhancement of their function represent a possible outcome of ... Why not "represents"? I ...
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"A bit" and "a little" can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but if a noun follows

Page 557 of Collins English Usage reads A bit and a little can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but not with an adjective that is in ...
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Is "a very heavy security" correct in English?

Can I say in English "There is a very heavy security around that building" meaning that there are not only many security guards around the building, but there are also some other security-...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Can an uncountable noun be an apposition of a countable noun?

Can an uncountable noun be an apposition of a countable noun? For example, A castle, sand, is desturcted. It means a sand castle (a castle made of sand) is destructed.
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2 votes
1 answer
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Can "potion" be uncountable?

I don't understand why all dictionaries say "potion" is countable. That is we can not say "he drank some potion". Normally, a witch boils/makes a pot of potion. And then she just ...
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use plural verbs or singular verbs with the uncountable noun in this case?

As far as I know, 'spending' is a uncountable noun. In the Cambridge dictionary, it means 'the money that is used for a particular purpose, especially by a government or organization' and is labelled ...
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Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why not "a good battery backup"?

Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why is it not "a good battery back up"? Why do we have to omit the article? If you are looking for a smartphone with a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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There's an awareness of conspicuous consumption. Why is the article 'an' needed before awareness when awareness is an uncountable noun?

1.There's an awareness of conspicuous consumption. Why is the article "an" needed before awareness when awareness is an uncountable noun? Greenpeace works to promote awareness of the dangers ...
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1 answer
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Uncountability of “watermelon” and “pineapple”

I noticed that “watermelon” and “pineapple” are used as uncountable when the flesh of them is focused. Likewise, “strawberry” can be used as uncountable when strawberries are chopped or something?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Many colours and much colour

Many colours mean many types of colour, and much colour means a large quantity of colour, is it right? Colourful - Having much or varied colour https://www.lexico.com/definition/colourful
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1 answer
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They have to have a basic understanding of computers in order to use advanced technology.how is understanding countable here?Why the article 'a' used?

1.They have to have a basic understanding of computers in order to use advanced technology. 2.Yet in the long run would a wider sense of mutual understanding make us safer? In both cases 'a' is used ...
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1 answer
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How can a noun be countable and uncountable at the same time?

How can a noun be countable and uncountable at the same time? For example 'shock'. You can get a shock. I'm suffering from __ shock.
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2 votes
1 answer
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'at very high altitude', 'at very high altitudes': both are okay in this sentence?

I'd like to know and ask whether both the sentences below are correct. At very high altitude you will have difficulty breathing. At very high altitudes you will have difficulty breathing. My ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is it OK to say "I drink much water"?

There was a question like this: Which alternatives are correct? Sometimes only one alternative is correct, and sometimes two alternatives are possible. I drink ___ water every day. A much B a lot ...
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Society: countable, uncountable, or both in this particular case?

Could you please help with the following: are both options correct? If so, which one is preferred and why? Option 1: Our society had been gradually morphing from a very uncivilised one to the society ...
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2 answers
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Using "the" before a non countable nouns

The decomposition of microscopic animals at the bottom of the sea results in an accumulation of .... in porous rocks. the oil / oil Which one is correct and why? I know when we are talking about a ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Can we use 'one' after uncountable nouns?

For example, is it possible to say the following: 'Music degraded from a very good one to a bad one' If not, what's the natural way to say it? Many thanks!
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Why is there a definite article before “rain”?

Villagers are now waiting for the rain to come so that the rice will grow. Why is it the rain in this sentence, not rain without the definite article? We are talking about rain in general to come, ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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noun phrase or not subsumed into the word snow

Do you say (1) "There was three feet of snow" or (2) "There were three feet of snow" when referencing the amount of snow and NOT three-feet made of snow! I.e. is the phrase "...
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Is "in fiction" right?

It is all very well for such things to occur in fiction. Why not use in fictions?
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Use of indefinite article with non countable nouns [closed]

As per the article rule, we should not use an indefinite article before the non countable nouns. But following are the examples of the indefinite articles with non countable nouns. Day 3 has been a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Deviation from the dictionary meaning of "fall about" and unreasonable plural form of water

So now Della's beautiful hair fell about her, rippling and shining like a cascade of brown waters. (From O Henry's The Gift of the Magi) The phrasal verb "fell about" means "to laugh ...
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3 votes
3 answers
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"legal protection" vs "legal protections"

The following is an example from the Cambridge dictionary: The proposed law is intended to provide legal protections for farm workers. What would be the difference between "protection" and ...
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1 vote
3 answers
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"LegislationS" to indicate the laws (for the same subject matter) established by different provincial or state governments

I know that "legislation" is almost always used in its uncountable form. legislation: a law or set of laws suggested by a government and made official by a parliament But what about in the ...
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Indefinite article with non-count noun

Can anybody explain to me the use of the indefinite article in the following sentences: She had a great zest for life. The danger of being caught added a certain zest to the affair. "Zest" ...
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2 votes
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The building was destroyed by (a) fire

The building was destroyed by a fire. The building was destroyed by fire. I have almost always used “fire” as an uncountable noun. What’s the difference between the two sentences? Which example is a ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Why don't we use the definite article in "you have the experience of..."?

Consider these examples: Do you have the experience of working with kids? Do you have experience of working with kids? From what I have learned, we can use "the" with uncountable nouns ...
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1 answer
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Could you please suggest the correct article usage here?

In the following sentence, do I need an article before "external influence"? The juvenile being more vulnerable to (an?) external influence such as numerous marketing campaigns tend to be ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Uncountable Nouns vs. Plural Nouns

Meals are a time for human connection. Meals are a time for human connections. What’s the difference between these two sentences? To me both seem to have the same meaning, and I am unable to figure ...
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0 votes
3 answers
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Uncountable and plural nouns: "space"

Is this sentence true: there isn't any more space in my suitcase. In this case can we use space in plural or it remains as a singular form.
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1 vote
3 answers
1k views

The word "exercise" as an uncountable noun [duplicate]

Swimming is good exercise. Swimming is a good exercise. I checked all the major dictionaries and they say that it is uncountable when it means (physical or mental activity that you do to stay healthy ...
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