Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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2answers
30 views

Equipment or equipments? [closed]

I am having a conversation with some international learners of English. I am assuming that the term equipment is singular and plural. A chat friend insists that the term equipments is the appropriate ...
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1answer
24 views
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1answer
17 views
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1answer
23 views

I am leaving town for a few days. can I use definite article ’the’ before the uncountable noun ’town’ here

Here the town is an uncountable noun When referred to work place or place where I live and don’t use an article.But in the conversation if I had mentioned the word town or spoke about it already,...
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1answer
17 views

We are hoping for ‘mutual divorce’ or ‘a/the mutual divorce’. Is divorce here countable or uncountable?

How to recognise uncountable nouns.? When should we avoid using articles especially before the nouns that act as both countable and uncountable nouns?
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1answer
23 views

Should I use an article in “extract text from document” phrases?

I am writing an article about the extraction of an entire text from a document. I am not sure if I should use "a", "the", or nothing in "extract text" phrases. Sample sentences: "How to extract text ...
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1answer
50 views

Can I say “this water” or “that furniture”? [closed]

Can I say "this water" or "that furniture" ? If I can, what does it mean?
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1answer
58 views

Can we say “He is a scum”?

According to dictionaries, "scum" can be used in countable or uncountable sense; but "He is a scum" sounds wrong to my ears. Can the sentences "He is a scum" and "He is scum" be used interchangeably?
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0answers
11 views

There are much\many *(un)countable* and *(un)countable*

I worry about a sentence in which I combine two objects which are (un)countable. For example: There is much water and sand in this lake There are much water and sand in this lake On the one hand, ...
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1answer
22 views

What’s the difference between We need someone to take ownership of the issue. and We need someone to take ‘the’ ownership of the issue?

What does having ‘the’ before ownership in the second sentence indicate? When to use ‘the’ if I want to use ‘the’ before ownership?
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1answer
22 views

it’s a pleasure meeting you or it’s pleasure meeting you.Why do we put the article’a’ when pleasure is an abstract and uncountable noun?

How to use uncountable nouns as countable nouns? Here pleasure is abstract noun and how to identify uncountable nouns as countable nouns according to situations?
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1answer
29 views

What’s the difference between abide by law and abide by the law? What does the article the’ before the word law represent?

Is the phrase abide by law is correct? How to use articles after prepositions like by and in ?
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2answers
37 views

Sleep - countable?

So my first assumption is, of course, that you have to say "I had little sleep", but so many people say "I had a little sleep", and I can't understand why "sleep" becomes countable all of a sudden. Is ...
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4answers
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A fish\Two fish\Two fishes [duplicate]

Do I understand the next right? I caught a fish It will mean I just caught some fish in quantity of one. I caugh two fish Means I caught two fish that are of the same species I caught two fishes I ...
6
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1answer
1k views

“got any eggs” vs. “got any egg”

Have we got any eggs? vs Have we got any egg? What is the difference between these two sentences in terms of meaning?
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2answers
29 views

Do “I ate many noodles today” and “you should eat many vegetables” sound wrong?

According to dictionary "noodle" is a countable noun and often in plural form I learned that we can use "many" before countable nouns. Does "I ate many noodles today" sound wrong? In addition, "...
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0answers
16 views

“I need to dig deeper in hard disk” VS “I need to dig deeper in the hard disk”?

I need to dig deeper in hard disk or I need to dig deeper in the hard disk. Which one is right? Is hard disk uncountable? Is hard disk uncountable noun in the first sentence if the ...
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1answer
20 views

Much more/many more

I undestand we use many more when talking about things we can count, with countable nouns. And much more with uncountable ones. But I was wondering if there were cases where they could be ...
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1answer
51 views

What’s the difference between due to lockdown and due to a lockdown? Can I use article before the word lock down?

People are working from home due to lockdown or people are working from home due to a lockdown? Which one is true? And why the other one is not true incase one of the usages is not correct?
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1answer
23 views
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2answers
41 views

'My source has video of the crash site' and why not 'my source has a video of the crash site'? Why the article ‘a’ cannot be used?

My source has video of the crash site. and why not my source has a video of the crash site? Why the article a cannot be used? Also there are other sentences like we had a video made of our wedding. ...
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0answers
30 views

How to use the word abuse as a countable noun?

Holding animals in captivity is considered abuse. or Holding animals in captivity is considered an abuse. I am confused about having an article or no article before the word abuse. I am ...
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1answer
908 views

Is 'optimism' countable?

Cambridge Dictionary offers the sentence below as an example of give rise to: International support has given rise to a new optimism in the company. Although it's shown in Cambridge Dictionary and ...
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1answer
43 views

When “education” should be a singular noun and when should it be an uncountable noun?

Cambridge dictionary states that "education" can be both a singular noun like "an education" and an uncountable noun like "zero-article education". As far as I know it depends whether the context is ...
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2answers
72 views

A bit of toothpaste?

My English learner app said "a bit of toothpaste" was wrong but didn't say the reason. Could you please tell me why? The app test goes like this. Choose the correct one: a bit of ______ A)...
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1answer
103 views

“All leaves are cancelled.” or “All leave is cancelled.”?

How do we use the word "leave" in a sentence? Is it ever pluralized? Is it correct to say "How many days leaves do you get per year?" or "How much leave do you get per year?"
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1answer
30 views

Articles before uncountable noun form of “Need”

I am really confused as to why there is an article before the singular uncountable form of " need" noun. I stumbled upon this while looking out for its usage in Oxford learner's dictionary. "There's ...
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1answer
1k views

“Police is” or “police are”? [duplicate]

I am aware that we alway treat the police as singular when we refer to it as social instutution. But what about if are refering to police as a group of people who are policemen? For example: There ...
2
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3answers
100 views

Uncountable and countable

All the major dictionaries say that exercise, when denotes a physical activity, is an uncountable noun. Swimming is good exercise. (OALD) Cycling to work is good exercise. (Cambridge ...
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1answer
36 views

Can we count an uncountable noun to mean that it is a type of something

Can we count an uncountable noun (or an usually uncountable noun) to mean that it is a type of something? Examples: 1 This thing is a food. (to mean that this is a type of food.) 2 This ...
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1answer
34 views

have a friendship or have friendship

BBC: I have friendship with all the living beings The New York Times: I have multiple doormen and I have a friendship with one of them According to Cambridge, friendship is both countable and ...
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2answers
435 views

“What fruit do you like” or “what fruits do you like”?

Let's say I want to know the name of fruits a person likes. Do I have to say fruit or fruits? For example: What fruit do you like? What fruits do you like?
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1answer
132 views

Is “quality” countable or uncountable in the following context?

I used to think that when quality refers to the standard of something, it is a mass noun. However, a sentence I saw the other day complicated the issue. It reads like this: "Using this definition, ...
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1answer
25 views

Which article is aloud to be used with the term “launch power”?

I'm having problem with the usage of articles for the word "power", namely "launch power" (the power at the input of a glass fiber): "power" is uncountable in this case: Power" can also mean ...
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0answers
19 views

Can I say he is misusing the Uncountables?

The youth of today dream of high-quality educations. Is this sentence correct? A teacher often use the Uncountable Nouns such as knowledges, educations, sugars as plurals. Can I say he is misusing ...
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1answer
38 views

Which linking verb to use with countable and uncountable nouns

Here is my example: "Cloud phone solutions work over the internet, so the only on-site hardware you would ever need (is/are) the phones." Hardware is uncountable, but phones is countable. Is the ...
2
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1answer
49 views

Why no article?

I'm a university student of English and we are studying "Articles" in our grammar module. Our teacher gave us this sentence, "You have egg on your tie." And asked us why we haven't used an article. ...
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0answers
67 views

aspect of vs aspect to difference

I don't understand why aspect noun takes "to" preposition later on. I would trust the professional's advice in that aspect of economics. There are many fascinating aspects to the complex procedure. ...
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2answers
85 views

Non-countable nouns in English that end on “-s”

The word "news" appears to be plural - Oxford Dictionary says its origin is "Late Middle English plural of new, translating Old French noveles or medieval Latin nova ‘new things’." Yet in modern ...
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3answers
579 views

“Distance” vs “a distance”

I would like to understand in which cases the word distance is a mass noun and in which it is not. Indeed, distance is something that one can measure, so for me it looks like it should be a mass noun. ...
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2answers
664 views

lemonade - countable or uncountable

Is "lemonade" countable or uncountable? Could I say the following sentence? Could you please bring me a lemonade? Or must I say "a glass of lemonade" ?
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2answers
757 views

What is correct - grape flavor or grapes flavor?

Its very confusing which is correct: grape flavor or grapes flavor We had a debate in our office regarding the collective noun - Grapes As per user3169 [in ELL]: "You should use grapes though, ...
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1answer
645 views

Why do we say “involve any risk” and not “involve any risks”

Financial Times: The near-obsession with defending the rating has ensured that where the bank loan involves any risk..... The Guardian: This is not at all to say that we should demonise youth ...
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3answers
100 views

How do I know whether a noun is countable or not? [duplicate]

I'm new learner and often confused with countable nouns. Is there any way that I can know whether a noun is a countable noun? Thanks
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2answers
64 views

I am suffering from a headache

1. I am suffering from a headache. 2. I am suffering from toothache. 3. I am suffering from backache. According to Raymond Murphy headache is countable because it is common, while toothache, ...
2
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2answers
168 views

Is the usage _a chalk piece_ acceptable in modern English?

Most teachers in India say chalk piece or a chalk piece instead of a piece of chalk. I know that chalk is uncountable and the correct usage is a piece of chalk. But I have read in certain books ...
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1answer
33 views

about use of an article in front of 'trim'

I'd like to ask about use of an article before the noun 'trim' when 'trim' means: "material that is used to decorate clothes, furniture, cars, etc., especially along the edges, by being a different ...
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1answer
1k views

Water, a water and waters

1. Water boils at 100°c. 2. Still waters run deep. Based on the two sentences we can say that water is both uncountable and countable.If water is countable "a water" should be there as in the case ...
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1answer
43 views

Shall I use an article with the phrase “increasing trend”?

If I want to use the word increasing trend, shall I consider it countable or uncountable? i.e. should I write: With an increasing trend towards using the Internet, the need for security is becoming ...
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0answers
22 views

(a) test administration

If you encounter a problem during a test administration, please first report your concern to the test center supervisor. From https://www.lsac.org/lsat/taking-lsat/lsat-test-center-problems-...

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