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Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

The tag has no usage guidance.

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1answer
18 views

The/A or no article: Fishing line

Does the word fishing line have a plural? Wikipedia says that there is a plural, and in the Longman Dictionary it is uncountable. There are no articles in similar sentences: Canada Goose ...
3
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1answer
22 views

Is technology a mass noun?

I am wondering if the sentence below is correct: The company transferred critical 5G technologies to one of its partners in order to make it's supply chain more efficient. Can you also use it ...
2
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1answer
26 views

Neutral accent or a neutral accent (countable or not)

In the context of the sentence below, which should be applied so it's grammatical. The only thing that is good about our country (as a single noun) is our spoken English, we've got neutral accent. ...
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2answers
38 views

Using 'shame', 'pity', and 'honor' as countable and uncountable nouns

Sometimes "a" is used with shame/pity/honor, sometimes it's not. What's the difference? How to understand when it should be used. Have pity! Please have a pity on the helpless. Shame on you! ...
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1answer
33 views

Can a material noun be countable?

I get stuck to differentiate between some common and material noun. Can material noun be countable? Are egg, earth, nail, sun and moon material nouns? when can I use article in front of a ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Do we say “stocks” when we refer to stocks in general?

But stock can become plural when used synecdochically to refer to a stock market, a portfolio, or a segment of a market—for example Found the above, but it didn't cover the example when we speak of ...
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2answers
39 views

use of Indefinite Article

I have doubt about use of article in below sentence. A cake is necessary when you have party. Does sentence uses correct article?
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1answer
30 views

Uncountable word “pain”

As regards the word pain being uncountable, which of the following is correct: I had a severe pain last night. I had severe pain last night.
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3answers
25 views

How can I count multiple heating?

I found the following sentence: There is too much heating. According to my dictionary, heating is an uncountable noun, so you cannot say heatings. However, it is possible that you have more than ...
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1answer
54 views

Why is “little” not the correct option to fill “only ___ milk left”?

In Destination B2 book, these definitions are given for quantifiers little and a little: little: uncountable nouns, means 'not much' a little: uncountable nouns, means 'some' Now, given the ...
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1answer
17 views

Multiple adjectives before uncountable noun

If I say Sick, leave and benefit entitlement information is available here Should I use is or are here in this sentence?
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1answer
27 views

When sentence's subject contains uncountable noun and plural noun. Is it singular or plural?

Physical training and activities benefit(s) children. This subject should be followed by singular or plural verb? "Activities" is plural and "training" is uncountable and should be treated as ...
0
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1answer
19 views

a … quantity of + plural countable nouns

I learned that "a ... quantity of ..." is typically followed by uncountable nouns. I'd like to know whether there are restrictions on it when it is followed by plural nouns. For example: a large ...
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1answer
25 views

How to use furniture in this sentence?

Is it correct to say: The only furniture that I have is a bed Or I have to put some sort of modifier before it? For example: The only piece of furniture that I have is a bed.
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2answers
28 views

“Different influences”?

Then trade would have different influence on wages and employment. This is a line I am writing. I know that "influence" is both a count and noncount noun and that it is used mostly uncountably to ...
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2answers
28 views

“Through critical engagement with philosophical texts” or “Through a critical engagement with philosophical texts”

Through (a) critical engagement with philosophical texts, I examine the phenomena and provide an in-depth analysis. This is a line I am writing. The noun "engagement" seems tricky. Scrolling down ...
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2answers
50 views

“Comment on their character” or “comment on their characters”?

I would like to say a few words to comment on their character(s). I am wondering if "character" in the sense of qualities of personality is a count noun and can be pluralized. Macmillan and Cambridge ...
0
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1answer
51 views

Is “There were hundreds of students, not much of whom were girls” correct?

Is the sentence " "There were hundreds of students, not much of whom were girls" correct? Can we use much instead of many in these structure.
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2answers
77 views

When is “labor” countable and what does “labors” mean exactly?

I saw a line in the English subtitles of a non-English show: Stop playing. Go all out to fight me, or you will end up using up all of your labors. I first went and made sure the subtitles were ...
0
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1answer
39 views

“Ramen” or “ramens” in “He bought a pack of ramen(s)”

He bought a pack of ramen. He bought a pack of ramens. He bought two packs of ramen. He bought two packs of ramens. He bought a ramen. He bought two ramens. Which ones are grammatical?
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2answers
18 views

as much / many as

I'd like to know whether many or much should be used in the following: a. A whale could weigh as much / many as two tons. b. The company bought as much / many as two tons of cotton. I'd ...
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3answers
1k views

different “culture” or different “cultures”

I believe this is simple, yet crucial and time-worthy to know amongst ELLs. As a traveler, I've experienced different culture/cultures across the world. First off, culture is an uncountable noun. ...
2
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1answer
42 views

can we say “a much”?

My new phone has a much longer battery life. The sentence is copied from Cambridge dictionary. Why they have used “a” with uncountable noun "life"? Also can we write "a much"? We use much with ...
2
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2answers
65 views

Is “profit” a special case?

Company profits are down from last year's figures. (Copied from Cambridge dictionary.) 1) Why don't we use a possessive s? 2) Why do we use plural profits? 3) Why don't we use “the”? When you ...
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2answers
370 views

Is “prose” ever a count noun?

He writes a crystalline prose (source) I find this countable usage of "prose" from the Oxford Dictionaries very unusual. I have never seen "prose" used countably. In contrast, several dictionaries ...
0
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1answer
31 views

about using “a” or “the” before the feeling noun “content”

This question is about whether using a or the is possible or not in front of a noun that means a feeling, which, in this post's case, is content(satisfaction). The sentence below is from the entry ...
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1answer
56 views

Is the word “news” always singular?

Using Google Translate, I have this translation from Russian to English: каковы спортивные новости? what are the sports news? I know, that the word "news" is uncountable, so it is ...
1
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1answer
64 views

countable and uncountable at the same time. What does that mean?

In Cambridge online dictionary there are nouns which can be countable or uncountable at the same time. Example https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/society?q=Societies 1) What does ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Is “release” countable when used to mean “to let go” or “to make available”?

Is "release" a count noun or mass noun in the meaning of "let someone or something out of a place"? I see conflicting information from different dictionaries, even within the same dictionary. ...
1
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1answer
53 views

Determiner all + uncountable noun - which of the following sentences is correct?

All water has been filtered. or All water have been filtered. ? I've already searched about this especially in youtube. From what I learned, if it's an uncountable noun after determiner all, it ...
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4answers
218 views

Have a good command of something – is “command” countable or uncountable?

I am confused, the following examples are from the Oxford dictionary, all from the same entry (2). Why in some cases it is "a command" and in some it is treated as uncountable? ‘he had a brilliant ...
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2answers
49 views

Indefinite article before uncountable nouns

Please help me understand why the indefinite article is used in this case: "I had a marvellous time!"
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1answer
130 views

When is “dress” a mass noun?

I find the singular/uncountable usage of "dress" strange in this sentence. Expansive skirts on fashionable dress of the period proved the perfect blank canvas to showcase chintzes lush with ...
2
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1answer
34 views

The countability of “memoir” and “stocktaking” in this sentence

I find two nouns in this sentence from a Time article very strange. The Atlantic columns are enriched with personal memoir, and a stocktaking, as Coates takes the reader through his own life and ...
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9answers
5k views

What's the correct unit for homework?

Consider the case when a teacher has thirty students in the class. The noun "homework" is uncountable so he cannot say "I have thirty homeworks to grade every week." My question is that if there is ...
3
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3answers
395 views

How to ‘guess’ if a noun is countable or uncountable?

Not all the time I have access to dictionaries. In school, I learned that abstract nouns are not countable; however, English is an ever-evolving language and nothing can be so certain here including ...
3
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2answers
42 views

‘A fried rice’, ‘ fried rice’, or ‘ a bowl of fried rice’

I came across this sentence in an English book: A fried rice is 2,500 dong. I know that rice is a mass noun so it cannot be counted, and if ‘fried rice’ refers to the name of a dish, it is correct ...
4
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4answers
218 views

Using “fashion” countably vs. uncountably: “in (a) timely/similar/dramatic fashion”

I have always thought fashion is countable when used to signify a particular manner (e.g., I will get that done in a timely fashion), but I just encountered these sentences in the Oxford Dictionaries (...
2
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2answers
188 views

“paint”: mass noun vs count noun

Jackson Pollock dropped paints on canvas seemingly at random. (Source) I have always thought the noun "paint" is uncountable when referring to color/colored liquid/solid pigment. But the above ...
0
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1answer
91 views

How do we come to know a noun in a sentence is a countable or uncountable noun?

Road is countable and uncountable noun. (see Cambridge) ex. The traffic on the road was quite bad. Definite article [the] is placed before road. As per the rule the can be placed before countable ...
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1answer
75 views

“A couple of weights” Is it grammatical to use “weight” as a countable noun?

I heard a line in the movie The Reluctant Fundamentalist Looks like you picked up a couple of weights, too, huh? The speaker of this line apparently suggests that the other party has gained weight....
0
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3answers
173 views

Consultation: “uncountable noun” or “countable noun”

I have a question related to usage of the word consultation. Can you please tell me if I should use singular or plural form of the word in the following context? Consultations require a personal ...
2
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2answers
46 views

Does this noun phrase (a variable name) take a singular or plural verb?

I'm writing a codebook that defines variables in a data set. Should the verb of the following sentence be singular or plural (refer/refers)? (Note that the italics appear in original; they are, ...
3
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2answers
66 views

any reason behind writing looks are?

I know that the noun looks usually takes plural form, eg: Her looks are deceptive. But since looks is an uncountable noun, why does it take a plural verb? Shouldn't it be treated like the other ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Much problem/much problems?

Let's say you are describing your future house's space. Spaciousness is key so I would not have much problem/problems moving around places in the house. I know that ''problem'' is countable noun, ...
19
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4answers
6k views

Can “staff” ever be pluralized?

I am under the impression that the word staff is uncountable/singular when referring to a collection of employees in a company. This is corroborated by some online sources I have found: Macmillan and ...
2
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2answers
72 views

In the sentence of concern, should I use the plural form of the noun?

If you like a song, and you think it's catchy, could you say this? Songs don't get much catchier than this. My concern is the plural songs, when people say things similar to Life can't/doesn't ...
2
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1answer
187 views

The police or police [duplicate]

He must have called the police. OR He must have called police. I think we use the first one when we know about a specific group of police officers which we have called and the second one, when, ...
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3answers
1k views

Why some countable nouns treated as uncountable?

since the inception of the iPod we have seen numerous audio formats come to market yet only a select few of them have been adopted on a mass scale. (Source: What is the best audio format? - ...
3
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2answers
135 views

Isn't “fog” uncountable when referring to a weather phenomenon?

I came across an example sentence on Merriam Webster: a climate marked by heavy fogs Isn't fog a noncount noun when used to refer to weather, according to the Cambridge Dictionary. The ODO and the ...