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Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

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2
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1answer
38 views

Why no article?

I'm a university student of English and we are studying "Articles" in our grammar module. Our teacher gave us this sentence, "You have egg on your tie." And asked us why we haven't used an article. ...
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0answers
16 views

aspect of vs aspect to difference

I don't understand why aspect noun takes "to" preposition later on. I would trust the professional's advice in that aspect of economics. There are many fascinating aspects to the complex procedure. ...
-1
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2answers
77 views

Non-countable nouns in English that end on “-s”

The word "news" appears to be plural - Oxford Dictionary says its origin is "Late Middle English plural of new, translating Old French noveles or medieval Latin nova ‘new things’." Yet in modern ...
5
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3answers
385 views

“Distance” vs “a distance”

I would like to understand in which cases the word distance is a mass noun and in which it is not. Indeed, distance is something that one can measure, so for me it looks like it should be a mass noun. ...
1
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2answers
44 views

lemonade - countable or uncountable

Is "lemonade" countable or uncountable? Could I say the following sentence? Could you please bring me a lemonade? Or must I say "a glass of lemonade" ?
4
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2answers
478 views

What is correct - grape flavor or grapes flavor?

Its very confusing which is correct: grape flavor or grapes flavor We had a debate in our office regarding the collective noun - Grapes As per user3169 [in ELL]: "You should use grapes though, ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Why do we say “involve any risk” and not “involve any risks”

Financial Times: The near-obsession with defending the rating has ensured that where the bank loan involves any risk..... The Guardian: This is not at all to say that we should demonise youth ...
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3answers
32 views

How do I know whether a noun is countable or not?

I'm new learner and often confused with countable nouns. Is there any way that I can know whether a noun is a countable noun? Thanks
0
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2answers
54 views

I am suffering from a headache

1. I am suffering from a headache. 2. I am suffering from toothache. 3. I am suffering from backache. According to Raymond Murphy headache is countable because it is common, while toothache, ...
2
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2answers
98 views

Is the usage _a chalk piece_ acceptable in modern English?

Most teachers in India say chalk piece or a chalk piece instead of a piece of chalk. I know that chalk is uncountable and the correct usage is a piece of chalk. But I have read in certain books ...
1
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1answer
29 views

about use of an article in front of 'trim'

I'd like to ask about use of an article before the noun 'trim' when 'trim' means: "material that is used to decorate clothes, furniture, cars, etc., especially along the edges, by being a different ...
0
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1answer
89 views

Water, a water and waters

1. Water boils at 100°c. 2. Still waters run deep. Based on the two sentences we can say that water is both uncountable and countable.If water is countable "a water" should be there as in the case ...
-1
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1answer
37 views

Shall I use an article with the phrase “increasing trend”?

If I want to use the word increasing trend, shall I consider it countable or uncountable? i.e. should I write: With an increasing trend towards using the Internet, the need for security is becoming ...
0
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0answers
22 views

(a) test administration

If you encounter a problem during a test administration, please first report your concern to the test center supervisor. From https://www.lsac.org/lsat/taking-lsat/lsat-test-center-problems-...
0
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0answers
28 views

Patient, countable or noncountable

"The company works with hospitals to develop VR games for patients. And we make sure that they’re re-orientable, so that the patient, whether they’re lying down or sitting up can enjoy them. VR is ...
1
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1answer
23 views

a better understanding of this structure

Parents have a better understanding for\of their children than schools. Fathers and mothers have a better knowledge about their children than schools. Why “a” is used here although “...
1
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1answer
39 views

ordinal numbers modifying uncountable nouns?

I'd like to know whether it is grammatical in contemporary English to modify an uncountable noun with ordinal numbers. Is it right to say, "first disobedience" or "second importance"?
1
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1answer
30 views

Is “set” countable or not?

This question comes from this post. This figure is trying to illustrate 4 spaces defined by 4 different set of standard basis. In mathematics, the standard basis (also called natural basis) for ...
0
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2answers
50 views

Use of Uncountable or mass nouns in the plural form

Most grammar sources and Grammarly app say that uncountable nouns can not be used in plural form! However, what about the case when we talk about different types of uncountable noun? For example, let ...
0
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1answer
35 views

“fruit and vegetable intake” vs “fruit and vegetables intake”

In the answer to the question Vegetable or vegetables it is said that in English, only vegetables but not vegetable can be used, since it is not considered a mass noun. I'm aware the following is not ...
1
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1answer
103 views

Vegetable or vegetables?

The book I'm using writes vegetable in a plural form. I don't think this is correct. Do you like strawberries or lettuce? No. I like neither fruit or vegetables. Should it be written as: ...
1
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1answer
20 views

How can an uncountable noun be associated with plural nouns?

I collected data on income in some countries and found that (all) the income data is close to each other. I am not sure that the expression "is close to each other" in the sentence above I created ...
2
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1answer
416 views

“worth the effort” vs. “worth the efforts”

Is the noun used "differently" in "worth the effort" vs. "worth the efforts" ? According to Merriam-Webster, effort has the following 5 definitions - conscious exertion of power : hard work a ...
0
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1answer
40 views

Why is “coma” countable in “go into a coma”?

I came across a phrase “go into a coma” and wonder why “coma” is countable here. Is there any rule which determines a noun followed by “go into” is countable or uncountable? Here are some other ...
0
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1answer
32 views

ordinal numbers with uncountable nouns

I know countables can be used with ordinal numbers. We can say "the second book," etc. But what about uncountables like "information"? I'd appreciate your help.
3
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3answers
133 views

When to use the uncountable form of a noun?

I understand that certain nouns are both uncountable and countable at the same time. Some of these nouns have different meanings in different form so choosing which form to use is relatively easy. ...
0
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1answer
19 views

The use of the indefinite article with uncountable nouns after the phrase “more of”

I came across it in this article. Chloe Foster, a clinical psychologist at the Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma in London, says shyness in itself is quite common and normal and doesn’t cause ...
0
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0answers
12 views

“the data that were observed.” When to use plural verbs and pronouns with mass nouns?

I was bumping into the word them used together with mass nouns in some translations from Chinese, but according to this ELL post, we don't use plurals with mass nouns. And now I encounter the 10k ...
0
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1answer
42 views

Can you use “including” after an uncountable word?

Can you use "including" after an uncountable word? Because the question is highly context-dependent I will just give you the sentence. He watched all of the porn including the bad ones. Sorry, I ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Shouldn't it be “…garbage is dumped” instead of “are’?

Garbage is singular and I don't think quantity has something to do here. Woman: Talk dirty to me! Man: 14 billion pounds of garbage are dumped into the ocean every year. Most of it is plastic.
3
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2answers
43 views

countable counterpart of “fruit”

I was taught that the noun "fruit" is non-countable in English. If so, then what would be its countable counterpart? I am sure there should be one because the need for that is quite practical. Let'...
2
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1answer
49 views

Is there not much sugar and many candies in the shop?

I had such a sentence: Are there not much sugar and candies in the shop? And I was confuseed with "are".On the one hand it should be "are" for we combine "sugar" = "it" and "candies" = they ...
1
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1answer
83 views

Countable/Uncountable Nouns (Use of “some”)

My grammar book says I can say "I've seen some good movies" but couldn't say "I've seen good movies". What is wrong with second sentence?
1
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1answer
249 views

'Morning'-->countable or uncountable?

1)There is written in the Macmillan dictionary that the word 'morning' can be both: countable or uncountable. Could you give me an example sentence where 'morning' is uncountable? 2) Is 'morning' ...
3
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2answers
44 views

How much shrimps?

if i want to ask about the amount of shrimps that a person eats (kilograms) per year, should i ask How many shrimps do you eat? - > I eat 1 kilo a year. Or maybe I should ask How much ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Only dead fish “go” or “goes”?

In the following quote, why does it use "go" instead of "goes"? Only dead fish go with the flow. Don't be a dead fish!
0
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1answer
32 views

uncountable noun used with countable noun

The controller controls power supplied to the PCs. Does the sentence above imply that each PC will be supplied with an equal amount of power? If so, does the following make sense when each PC may be ...
0
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1answer
26 views

How to express one-to-one correspondence for uncountable noun

Ramp A produces light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to it from battery A. Ramp B produces light of an intensity that depends on electric current supplied to it from ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Is *flood* used as *a flood*?

I wonder if the word flood can be used as a flood. I think the word like water cannot be used as a water because it is a collective noun. In my dictionary, it writes both countable and uncountable. ...
1
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2answers
130 views

Is “bit of oil” countable or uncountable?

If it is countable why do we say a little bit of oil and can I say the following? a little quantity of seeds
2
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2answers
107 views

Why is “bad news seemS” and not “bad news seem”?

In an online English test I found that "bad news seem" is wrong, the correct would be "bad news seems" as in the sentence: Bad news seems to be more attractive than good news. I'm considering ...
1
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1answer
17 views

Is it correct to use “the education of a nation's youth”?

In the following sentence, is it correct to use the phrase 'the education of a nation's youth'? is the word 'youth' singular or plural? The education of a nation's youth will shape its future.
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3answers
78 views

Is 'potential' countable noun?

I've konwn that 'potential' is uncountable noun so far. But i saw one vedio named Vox channel which said "In any human endeavor, There is a potential for error" In that sentence, potential is ...
0
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2answers
381 views

a glass of milk , two glasses of milk which one takes singular verb and which one plural?

milk is uncountable but when uncountable nouns is placed in a countable container then it becomes countable . So , when i use a glass of milk it becomes countable but either it is singular or not ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Can 'singer' be used as an uncount noun?

Singer Mizuki Nana and her sister took viewers by surprise with their voracious eating of roasted duck. Macmillan learner's dictionary says 'singer' is a count noun. Might I trouble you to tell me ...
0
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1answer
37 views

The/A or no article: Fishing line

Does the word fishing line have a plural? Wikipedia says that there is a plural, and in the Longman Dictionary it is uncountable. There are no articles in similar sentences: Canada Goose ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Is technology a mass noun?

I am wondering if the sentence below is correct: The company transferred critical 5G technologies to one of its partners in order to make it's supply chain more efficient. Can you also use it ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Neutral accent or a neutral accent (countable or not)

In the context of the sentence below, which should be applied so it's grammatical. The only thing that is good about our country (as a single noun) is our spoken English, we've got neutral accent. ...
1
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2answers
166 views

Using 'shame', 'pity', and 'honor' as countable and uncountable nouns

Sometimes "a" is used with shame/pity/honor, sometimes it's not. What's the difference? How to understand when it should be used. Have pity! Please have a pity on the helpless. Shame on you! ...
1
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1answer
118 views

Can a material noun be countable?

I get stuck to differentiate between some common and material noun. Can material noun be countable? Are egg, earth, nail, sun and moon material nouns? when can I use article in front of a ...