Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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indefinite article with uncountable nouns

Two sentences: (1) She has great experience in her work. (2) ‘She spoke with a great enthusiasm about the new plans. Question: Why is there no article ‘a’ with ‘great experience’ in the first ...
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2 answers
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Is it not many variety or not much variety?

Is it very confusing when we have to decide many or much on things we're not sure whether it's countable or cannot be counted. Money can be counted, but still it is with much? So who decides the logic?...
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Difference between abuse and abuses

1. He shouted vulgar abuse at me. 2. He shouted vulgar abuses at me. Which sentence is correct or both are correct? Is the word 'abuse' a countable or uncountable noun?
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Noncountable Noun With Plural Verb?

I'm currently struggling with whether to use a single or plural verb after an uncountable noun for the same event that happens multiple times. Example: The catalyst for these celebrations are/is ...
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2 answers
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When do I need an article between an uncountable noun and a preposition

I have a question about uncountable nouns when they follow a preposition. I know that in general we don't use an article with uncountable nouns if we want to talk about something in general, e.g. &...
2 votes
1 answer
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How can I know if "analysis" is countable or uncountable?

According to dictionaries, analysis can be both countable and uncountable. What is the rule to know if I should use the countable or uncountable form? For example: Completing consulting projects for ...
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5 votes
2 answers
790 views

Saying "a syrup" while syrup is uncountable

In Cambridge Dictionary, syrup is marked as an uncountable noun and there is no entry of it being countable. Quite contrary, in one of the examples of "syrup" in Cambridge Dictionary it has ...
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Using '(the) most' with uncountable nouns

Is it correct to say: The most money was spent on education. Saudi Arabia produced the most oil. And is there a difference between using the most and just most in the aforementioned examples? Is it ...
1 vote
1 answer
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Is it less funds or fewer funds?

As far as I know, countable nouns are used with 'few' and 'fewer,' whereas uncountable ones go with 'little' and 'less.' However, I encountered these examples: Reduced saving means less funds for ...
3 votes
4 answers
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Plural nouns are used in these situations, but why do they have different meanings?

So, someone has told me that I should use the plural nouns when mentioning my favorite animals. Otherwise, it would sound like I wanted to eat them. For example, I like cats instead of I like cat. If ...
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1 answer
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Some advice vs. advice vs. a piece of advice vs. any advice

What are the differences, in terms of the amount of advice asked for, between the following questions: Can you give me advice? Can you give me some advice? Can you give me a piece of advice? Can you ...
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Do we use articles with the word "attire?"

Do we use articles like a with the word "attire?" For instance, would you say, "I'm sure she'd look great in a black attire?"
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Does "worth of sth" need a singular verb or a plural verb?

I have come across this sentence: 1 $4 million worth of souvenirs and gift items have been produced for the event. If I am not mistaken, the "have been produced" refers to the word "...
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How to understand whether 'use' acts as a countable or uncountable noun [duplicate]

According to Macmillan Dictionary, the noun 'use' can be both countable and uncountable. How to understand whether it is countable or uncountable in a given context? Here're some examples I saw that ...
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What is the difference between 'ambitions' and 'ambition'?

I found a sentence below: When guided by a sense of moral purpose, they were able to channel their ambitions and summon their talents to enlarge the opportunities and lives of others. (Extract from ...
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"food vs foods" and "clothing vs clothes"?

There are two pair sentences about products in Japan, as follows. Which one, each, is better or (more) correct? And why? food vs foods 1a) More than 60% of food consumed in Japan is imported from ...
8 votes
4 answers
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Does the noun 'English' have to be always uncountable?

Does the noun 'English' have to be always uncountable? Grammarly doesn't like my using an indefinite article before the noun 'English' because, I suppose, it's an uncountable noun. So for instance: ...
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3 votes
3 answers
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Can noun "land" be countable when it refers to a certain plot?

The noun land is considered uncountable, at least for most cases. However, to my opinion, there is a situation when this word would appear more natural being countable noun. I mean plots of land, i.e. ...
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3 answers
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Is "She has as long hair as mine" a correct sentence?

Is this sentence correct and natural to you? She has as long hair as mine. If this is not correct or natural, why?
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Is 'a coffee' correct? [duplicate]

My knowledge says coffee is uncountable unless it's used in such a context like 'a cup of coffee' or 'a blend of Argentinian and Brazilian coffees' which are one of the best delicious things in the ...
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1 answer
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"they'd"/"there'd" be too much of "a distraction"/"distraction"?

What sentence is correct? 1 They'd be too much of a distraction. 2 They'd be too much of distraction. 3 There'd be too much of a distraction. 4 There'd be too much of distraction.
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2 answers
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three foods & three pieces of food

as far as I know: In the UK "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a fruit". In the USA "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a piece of fruit". For ...
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Are plural-only and singular-only nouns always uncountable?

As far as I understand, based on the literal meanings of the words "countable" and "uncountable": A noun is called countable when it can be counted, i.e. can be used with cardinal ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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counting an uncountable noun : chicken

I learned that sometimes I can count uncountable things in such a sentence like this: "I like this coffee much more than other coffees." Then, can I count pieces of chicken saying like this? ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Is the noun "time" always uncountable?

such long time such a long time I know that (time) is an uncountable noun but I'm a bit confused because I heard many people saying such a long time so which of them is correct?
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3 answers
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This is mashed potatoes or These are mashed potatoes

This question arose in the discussion of a language learning app. Its original sentence is in Russian and it says Это пюре а вот пицца. The translation from the app is This is mashed potatoes and ...
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2 answers
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I had a hard time vs I had hard times

I always don't understand how I can count time. In what situation can I use "a hard/good time" or "hard/good times"? Could you please show me examples of sentences, or explanations ...
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in the sentence "there is 2 litres of milk" is 2 litres countable or uncountable?

Is "2 litres" in the above sentence a countable noun? I have had mixed answers for this question. Some say yes, and some, no. I have read articles, but none give me any clear answer. ...
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1 answer
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Is the word "foods" countable or uncountable?

Sentence: Whole foods means food that's in its original form, straight from nature, typically whole fruits, veggies, whole grains, et cetera. I want to know why "means" not "mean" ...
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1 answer
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Should I use prices in the following sentence

The prices of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. or The price of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. Or if both are correct and it's ...
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Is it correct to use ''scores of (something)'' with uncountable nouns?

''Score of something'' means ''a lot of something.'' Although it is correct to use ''a lot of'' with uncountable nouns, I've never seen an example of ''scores of something'' used with an uncountable ...
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4 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is "fruit" used as a countable or uncountable noun?

I don't know if "fruit" works as a singular or a plural in these cases: HOW MANY fruit(s) or HOW MUCH fruit do you eat a day? Today I have had three fruit(s).
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Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? [closed]

Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? I mean, are there any English words that mean ‘substance or object’? If so, should I use an indefinite article, or not?
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6 votes
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The list of uncountable nouns that never take 'a/an'

There is a rule not use the article ‘a’ with uncountable nouns. Unless, we talk about a particular kind of the uncountable noun. For example, ‘a dreadful anger’, ‘a fragile calm’, ‘a great enthusiasm’ ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Name is countable or uncountable?

Let's say I'm writing a story and there's a character named Jim and he sees 10 identical people who have similarities with his friend Emily, in fact, they look exactly like Emily. What would Jim ...
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1 answer
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"merit": countable vs uncountable

The word "merit" seems to be used as both countable and uncountable, in both single and plural forms: "there is no much merit" — 23k results "the claim has no merit" — ...
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2 answers
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Is an adjective make uncountable noun countable?

I've mentioned in the previous question a few days ago that advice is an uncountable noun. I've seen when the noun is attached with an adjective beside it, there are some that have article a and some ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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has good reason vs has a good reason

Tom has good reason to be angry. Tom may well be angry. My textbook says that the above two sentences are the same. What is the meaning of "reason" above?
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4 votes
1 answer
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You can buy these from the supermarket. / ...supermarkets

Question: Where can I buy these cakes? Answer 1-You can buy these from the supermarket. (to refer to any supermarkets) Answer 2-You can buy these from supermarkets. I think that we can say ".........
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Is an uncountable noun treated as a singular noun?

For example, if a banana is mostly rotten, I can describe it just as ‘a banana is rotten.’ Water gets frozen from the top. If the water is mostly frozen (not in degree, but in amount), can I describe ...
5 votes
2 answers
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Using "a" with the word "slang"

Can I use the word "slang" with an indefinite article "a"? For example: That phrase is an obvious slang. or That choice of words is an obvious slang.
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1 answer
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Error Detection in noun [duplicate]

I am confused in this sentence : There are two scores of books (A) / which are lying (B) / unused in the library (C) / no error (D). The answer is part (A) and error is mentioned as scores. I am ...
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1 answer
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I am working as a consultant in a/in/in the corporate sector?

I am working as a consultant in a/in/in the corporate sector? Which one is right? what does the sentence mean with articles and without articles? can the corporate sector be an uncountable noun? And ...
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Uncountable noun 1 OR Uncountable 2 ARE/IS

I have just read the following: These design rules play an important role, and reworking or enhancement of their function represent a possible outcome of ... Why not "represents"? I ...
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"A bit" and "a little" can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but if a noun follows

Page 557 of Collins English Usage reads A bit and a little can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but not with an adjective that is in ...
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Is "a very heavy security" correct in English?

Can I say in English "There is a very heavy security around that building" meaning that there are not only many security guards around the building, but there are also some other security-...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Can an uncountable noun be an apposition of a countable noun?

Can an uncountable noun be an apposition of a countable noun? For example, A castle, sand, is desturcted. It means a sand castle (a castle made of sand) is destructed.
2 votes
1 answer
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Can "potion" be uncountable?

I don't understand why all dictionaries say "potion" is countable. That is we can not say "he drank some potion". Normally, a witch boils/makes a pot of potion. And then she just ...
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use plural verbs or singular verbs with the uncountable noun in this case?

As far as I know, 'spending' is a uncountable noun. In the Cambridge dictionary, it means 'the money that is used for a particular purpose, especially by a government or organization' and is labelled ...
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Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why not "a good battery backup"?

Looking for a smartphone that has "good battery backup"? Why is it not "a good battery back up"? Why do we have to omit the article? If you are looking for a smartphone with a ...

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