Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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3
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3answers
32k views

Money - Countable or Uncountable noun

This page suggests that we use much with only uncountable nouns whereas the use of many/several is limited to countable nouns only. So I conclude that money is uncountable noun as I've heard people ...
115
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10answers
24k views

Why do we say "I love cake" but "I love cars"?

Why do some nouns need to be in the plural for that structure to work, while some are ok in the singular? E.g.: I love pizza, I love beef, etc. I always thought it was a matter of countable x ...
11
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3answers
5k views

Using indefinite articles before adjectives: "Let's have a good breakfast"

Let's have breakfast Let's have a good breakfast I've learned that indefinite articles aren't used before uncountable nouns, so why is a used before the adjective "good" here? Is there an ...
7
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1answer
7k views

Confusion about 'less' and 'fewer' in sentences with countable/uncountable nouns

There were no less (or no fewer) than fifty persons in the dining hall. In 25 words or fewer/less, please summarize what took place. fewer / less calories? The hamburgers should contain no less/fewer ...
8
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3answers
30k views

"Some" and "Any"; countables and uncountable

I'm doing my English homework and my book says these sentences are correct: 1) Do you have any wine? 2) Can I have some water, please? My questions are: These sentences are structured differently. ...
12
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3answers
13k views

Does an uncountable noun take an article if it has an adjective before it?

We all know that uncountable noun does not take an article. But then, if there's an adjective modifying an uncountable noun what should happen? An article before adjective + uncountable noun? OR ...
8
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3answers
10k views

Is the sentence "Paul drinks much milk" grammatically correct or not?

I'm doing my homework. The question is Is this sentence ‘Paul drinks much milk.’ grammatically correct? For me the answer is yes, because the quantifier "much" is used before non-count ...
4
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1answer
4k views

Indefinite article before uncountable "drink" nouns, e.g. "a water"

I have been reading Bad for You (a novel) for the last seven days. I have seen in the novel that the writer used the indefinite article a before a uncountable noun water. I glanced at Linc again. ...
3
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3answers
1k views

How to ‘guess’ if a noun is countable or uncountable?

Not all the time I have access to dictionaries. In school, I learned that abstract nouns are not countable; however, English is an ever-evolving language and nothing can be so certain here including ...
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2answers
1k views

Uncountable nouns taking singular verbs when they are used as a body or a group

1) The team is at the top in this competition. 2) The team are full of high spirits. There are certain nouns which take singular verbs when referred as a group or body. A team is probably never ...
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2answers
17k views

My favorite fruit is grape/grapes

Let's say you are asked by your teacher what is your favorite fruit, then you say: "my favorite fruit is grape/grapes" Which one is correct in terms of the general selection according to what I ...
5
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1answer
1k views

Is "singular noun + and + singular noun" singular or plural?

When I type "[singular noun] and [singular noun]" in Word 2010, I find some interesting things. Bread and butter is essential. (the auto-correction warns me of subject-verb disagreement.) ...
3
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2answers
64k views

The furniture is/are

The furniture in our classroom ___ uncomfortable. Should I use is or are here? I found on the internet things like all of furniture is and house full of furniture is. But nothing about my example. ...
5
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2answers
62k views

"Part of the team" vs. "a part of the team"

I see both of these are used: I'm part of Acme's technical team. I'm a part of Acme's technical team. Which one sounds more natural when introducing myself in an email? Is "Part" ...
7
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2answers
14k views

"Have you ever had surgery?" Why does surgery in this sentence have no article?

Can't we ask instead, Have you ever had a surgery? Is surgery a countable noun? I guess we can speak of surgeries in the plural form. Why should we use zero article in this sentence? Update: What ...
2
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1answer
43 views

'at very high altitude', 'at very high altitudes': both are okay in this sentence?

I'd like to know and ask whether both the sentences below are correct. At very high altitude you will have difficulty breathing. At very high altitudes you will have difficulty breathing. My ...
2
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1answer
336 views

Listing differnet kinds of an uncoutable noun. Are they countable or uncountable?

How do you I refer to different kind of an uncountable noun? For example, this is a part of my writing: Using oil (coconut oil, olive oil) to moisturize your skin after bath. Those oil... I want ...
2
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3answers
239 views

Uncountable and countable

All the major dictionaries say that exercise, when denotes a physical activity, is an uncountable noun. Swimming is good exercise. (OALD) Cycling to work is good exercise. (Cambridge ...
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1answer
820 views

Can a material noun be countable?

I get stuck to differentiate between some common and material noun. Can material noun be countable? Are egg, earth, nail, sun and moon material nouns? when can I use article in front of a ...
7
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2answers
30k views

Is experience countable or uncountable?

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
20
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11answers
7k views

Is "bananas is" possible by any chance?

My brother is a highschooler. His mid-term English-language exam is early next month. His teacher gave him an assignment in preperation for the exam. One of the questions given is: (Bears - bananas ...
4
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1answer
132 views

Missing article in this construction involving an uncountable noun

In this YouTube video from 1:00 to 1:06 the following sentence is said: I can take anything that inspires me and make it part of our music. Should there be the indefinite article a before part? Is ...
20
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5answers
637 views

Can "zero" be used to describe uncountable nouns?

“There was zero courage in this verdict,” he said. ”I think this goes to the jury not wanting to make a difficult decision." I learned that mass nouns cannot be enumerated. Yes, I know that zero ...
19
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9answers
9k views

What's the correct unit for homework?

Consider the case when a teacher has thirty students in the class. The noun "homework" is uncountable so he cannot say "I have thirty homeworks to grade every week." My question is that if there is ...
7
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3answers
759 views

How to distinguish countable and uncountable senses?

The general rule is to use an article for countable nouns (i.e. nouns permitting a plural) and no article for uncountable nouns. However, some nouns may be countable in one sense and uncountable in ...
6
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3answers
3k views

Is it 'lesser' or 'less' when describing an amount of water?

From the following sentences, which one is more grammatically correct? Carbohydrates in diet need less amount of water in comparison to proteins and fats. Carbohydrates in diet need lesser amount of ...
4
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1answer
503 views

Disconnect (the / zero article) power before attempting to repair electrical equipment

Could you please advise which article should be used in the below sentence? I and my friend are doing an exercise of filling suitable article(s) (a / an / the / no article) into the blank of the ...
4
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2answers
4k views

"Why didn't you buy some [or any] cheese?"

As I know some is used for positive sentences and any for negative as well as question forms. But what about negative questions? Why didn't you buy any cheese? or Why didn't you buy some ...
3
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2answers
19k views

should it be ice cream or ice creams?

Should the term ice cream, in the sentence below, be countable or uncountable? The bowl consists of mini scoops of chocolate, vanilla and strawberry ice cream. The bowl consists of mini ...
3
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2answers
7k views

Without (the / no article) air and water, living things could not survive

Could you please advise whether I should use definite article 'the' in the below sentence? I'm helping my little sister with an exercise of filling suitable article(s) into the blank of the sentence: ...
2
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2answers
35k views

Is "funds" a plural or singular noun?

The dictionary enlists it as "fund," but the word "funds" is used quite often and it means money (Ok, it can have other meanings as well. I get that) Do I say, then, how much funds did the ...
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3answers
13k views

Which sentence is wrong?

I was doing an English test and I don't know how to answer this question. Which one of these sentences is correct? a) Could you give me an information, please? b) I have bought an interesting ...
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1answer
108 views

Plural and countability of the word 'performance'

Algorithms A and B provide good performance. Algorithms A and B provide good performances. Could you please tell me which one between the above sentences is correct ? Algorithm A provides ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Why do we say "involve any risk" and not "involve any risks"

Financial Times: The near-obsession with defending the rating has ensured that where the bank loan involves any risk..... The Guardian: This is not at all to say that we should demonise youth ...
5
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2answers
2k views

Is is grammatical to use a mass noun after the phrase "the majority of"?

The majority of people who have a church wedding ... is grammatical because "people" is a countable noun, but, for example, "driving" is not: The majority of driving is done on country roads or ...
5
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1answer
24k views

"How many...." vs. "How much fish"

What is the correct way to say the following phrase: How many fish did you catch yesterday? How much fish did you catch yesterday? Is fish countable or uncountable here? Given the answer ...
4
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4answers
2k views

Why are "software", "advice", and "information" uncountable?

Sometimes in English I encounter words which are uncountable, while they may be countable in my native language causing some mistakes in my sentences, and I wonder why they are uncountable. For ...
4
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1answer
2k views

News for plural

I am aware that news is singular and uncountable, so I cannot say it is a great news, for instance. If someone tells me a piece of news I say That's great news. But and if someone tells me two ...
3
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3answers
6k views

"There is a fog." Is the noun used correctly?

My kid saw the scene and told me, There is a fog. Do we use "a" before fog?
3
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4answers
13k views

Usage of "any" or "some" in "Would you like ..... wine?" [duplicate]

I have got another test question: Would you like ..... wine? any some This test assumes that the only correct answer is 'some' and some people argue that the use of 'any' in this ...
2
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3answers
110 views

"he is out of touch and incapable of rescuing Russia from crisis" -- why not "from a crisis"? -- which is grammatically more correct?

Example with a context: Putin and his allies blame the economic problems on what they call external factors, principally the West. Others, including former allies who worked with him, say he is out ...
2
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1answer
1k views

paddy field - is it countable or uncountable noun?

In some areas, **some fields could be found among the river, houses, etc. Could I say "some paddy fields"?
1
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1answer
273 views

Countable/Uncountable Nouns (Use of "some")

My grammar book says I can say "I've seen some good movies" but couldn't say "I've seen good movies". What is wrong with second sentence?
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2answers
3k views

What is the difference between functional relationship and functioning relationship?

What is the difference between functional relationship functioning relationship
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1answer
173 views

'Level' - no article? With an article?

The world 'level' is a bit tricky for me as it appears either with or without the definite article. I'm trying to understand when I can get rid of the definite article and when it should stay. I ...
0
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1answer
6k views

Water, a water and waters

1. Water boils at 100°c. 2. Still waters run deep. Based on the two sentences we can say that water is both uncountable and countable.If water is countable "a water" should be there as in the case ...