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Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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3 votes
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Do you need {some/any} scissors? Yes. Do you have {some/any}?

A: Do you need _____ scissors? B: Yes. Do you have _____? a. any/any b. any/some c. some/any d. some/some My answer is b. any/some. Is that correct? Or is it choice c. some/any because some scissors =...
NRCSSD's user avatar
  • 39
-1 votes
1 answer
119 views

Why 'all this code' instead of 'all these codes'?

Sometimes I encountered the form all this + singular noun instead of all these plural nouns when it is obvious to mention not a single entity but a number of things. Why? Is it a kind of ...
TUALL's user avatar
  • 403
0 votes
0 answers
48 views

Words with plural-only nouns

Some words are used only with singular countable nouns, others only with plural countable nouns and others only with uncountable nouns Category singularcountable pluralcountable uncountable plural-...
Gostlly's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

"The furniture items placed in guest rooms include a sofa, writing table, cupboard, luggage rack"— Can I use "furniture" instead of "furniture items"?

books.google.ru: (1) The furniture items placed in guest rooms include a sofa, writing table, cupboard, luggage rack etc. I wonder if I can use just "furniture" here instead of "...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,753
2 votes
2 answers
350 views

What type of nouns are 'cattle', 'staff' and 'jeans'?

I was taught that there are four types of nouns: singular countable: journey, sheep, child plural countable: journeys, sheep, children singular uncountable: travel, water, fruit plural uncountable:...
Kyamond's user avatar
  • 400
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

Disproportionality vs disproportionalities

Should one use disproportionality or disproportionalities? Is only one option correct or are both correct? If both options work, what is the difference and which option is more idiomatic? There is ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
236 views

"I have two good news for you."

Maybe the same as This is a good news. This is good news, or News for plural, but I found "I have two good news for you." in https://math.stackexchange.com/a/4780391/1230831, making me ...
U. Windl's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
1 answer
302 views

"I want a cup of coffee" vs "I want a coffee" [duplicate]

As far as I'm concerned, the sentence "I want a cup of coffee" sounds natural, but what about "I want a coffee"? Is it correct? I used Google search to find the number of times ...
rdrg109's user avatar
  • 199
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Is it right that common nouns after "the whole" are countable and after "the whole of the" are uncountable?

Trying to understand when I need to use "the whole" before common nouns and when "the whole of the", I came across the following rule on wordreference.com: If a singular common ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,753
1 vote
1 answer
23 views

turn their ambition/ambitions into reality/a reality

Since 'ambition' and 'reality' can be either countable or uncountable, do I have to use them both countably like Sentence 1 or I can use one of them countably while the other one uncountably like ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
46 views

"contraband" as an uncountable noun

The word "contraband" is defined as follows and marked uncountable in a dictionary: goods that are illegally taken into or out of a country If so, is the following sentence okay? This ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 5,996
1 vote
1 answer
992 views

How many beans vs How much beans?

When talking about beans, lentils or chickpeas should they be considered as countable or uncountable? Would a person normally say "How many beans should I cook?" or "how much beans ...
heapOverflow's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why can we use the article "a" with 'a long history' when 'history' is uncountable?

There was a closely related previous question here but wasn't answered properly. Maybe the reason can be as simple as "because people use that way", but is there another clearer answer for ...
Gwangmu Lee's user avatar
  • 1,133
1 vote
2 answers
206 views

Mood: countable or uncountable

Some dictionaries, such as Cambridge dictionary, show that mood is a countable noun. The drink had put him in an amiable mood. Other dictionaries, such as Macmillan dictionary, show that mood can be ...
chenzhongpu's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
63 views

Is it "tiny amount" or "tiny amounts"?

Can we use tiny amounts of something? Or are we have to use only in singular form, such as "tiny amount of any liquid"? I've seen people use small amounts and/or a small amount of something, ...
Qaher's user avatar
  • 153
2 votes
1 answer
61 views

"It’s one of the greatest American literature." Is this sentence correct?

It's a quote from a material of an online English school. https://eikaiwa.weblio.jp/information/speaking-material/conversation-material/expert-literature-and-art "It’s one of the greatest ...
kuwabara's user avatar
  • 1,488
1 vote
1 answer
133 views

Would it be wrong if you don't add the article "A" and still use the auxiliary "IS" with the word "SHEEP"?

I researched the word sheep, and its special singular and plural features. I understand plural and singular is the same and it can take "is" or "are" and the word will not change. ...
Yunus's user avatar
  • 7,401
2 votes
5 answers
868 views

this batch of honey

Let's say we have a number of batches of honey, each batch consisting of a number of containers). Two of the batches belong to John. One of those two batches is expensive and the other one isn't. ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,965
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What's the difference between "build a rapport" and "build rapport"?

I had a look on the Internet and came across both "build a rapport" (eg. I enjoy building a rapport with customers) and "build rapport" (eg. I enjoy building rapport with customers)...
Eclairyang's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

indefinite article with uncountable nouns

Two sentences: (1) She has great experience in her work. (2) ‘She spoke with a great enthusiasm about the new plans. Question: Why is there no article ‘a’ with ‘great experience’ in the first ...
Olek's user avatar
  • 161
1 vote
2 answers
460 views

Is it not many variety or not much variety?

Is it very confusing when we have to decide many or much on things we're not sure whether it's countable or cannot be counted. Money can be counted, but still it is with much? So who decides the logic?...
Mallimika's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

When do I need an article between an uncountable noun and a preposition

I have a question about uncountable nouns when they follow a preposition. I know that in general we don't use an article with uncountable nouns if we want to talk about something in general, e.g. &...
DerivativesGuy's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
387 views

How can I know if "analysis" is countable or uncountable?

According to dictionaries, analysis can be both countable and uncountable. What is the rule to know if I should use the countable or uncountable form? For example: Completing consulting projects for ...
user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
914 views

Saying "a syrup" while syrup is uncountable

In Cambridge Dictionary, syrup is marked as an uncountable noun and there is no entry of it being countable. Quite contrary, in one of the examples of "syrup" in Cambridge Dictionary it has ...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,060
1 vote
2 answers
91 views

Using '(the) most' with uncountable nouns

Is it correct to say: The most money was spent on education. Saudi Arabia produced the most oil. And is there a difference between using the most and just most in the aforementioned examples? Is it ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
348 views

Is it less funds or fewer funds?

As far as I know, countable nouns are used with 'few' and 'fewer,' whereas uncountable ones go with 'little' and 'less.' However, I encountered these examples: Reduced saving means less funds for ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
432 views

Plural nouns are used in these situations, but why do they have different meanings?

So, someone has told me that I should use the plural nouns when mentioning my favorite animals. Otherwise, it would sound like I wanted to eat them. For example, I like cats instead of I like cat. If ...
neko sama's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
210 views

Some advice vs. advice vs. a piece of advice vs. any advice

What are the differences, in terms of the amount of advice asked for, between the following questions: Can you give me advice? Can you give me some advice? Can you give me a piece of advice? Can you ...
A Slow Learner's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
33 views

Do we use articles with the word "attire?"

Do we use articles like a with the word "attire?" For instance, would you say, "I'm sure she'd look great in a black attire?"
Nopeyes21's user avatar
  • 189
1 vote
3 answers
203 views

Does "worth of sth" need a singular verb or a plural verb?

I have come across this sentence: 1 $4 million worth of souvenirs and gift items have been produced for the event. If I am not mistaken, the "have been produced" refers to the word "...
alireza's user avatar
  • 1,060
1 vote
2 answers
125 views

How to understand whether 'use' acts as a countable or uncountable noun [duplicate]

According to Macmillan Dictionary, the noun 'use' can be both countable and uncountable. How to understand whether it is countable or uncountable in a given context? Here're some examples I saw that ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

"food vs foods" and "clothing vs clothes"?

There are two pair sentences about products in Japan, as follows. Which one, each, is better or (more) correct? And why? food vs foods 1a) More than 60% of food consumed in Japan is imported from ...
T.K.Tommy's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

Does the noun 'English' have to be always uncountable?

Does the noun 'English' have to be always uncountable? Grammarly doesn't like my using an indefinite article before the noun 'English' because, I suppose, it's an uncountable noun. So for instance: ...
Fra's user avatar
  • 1,683
3 votes
3 answers
502 views

Can noun "land" be countable when it refers to a certain plot?

The noun land is considered uncountable, at least for most cases. However, to my opinion, there is a situation when this word would appear more natural being countable noun. I mean plots of land, i.e. ...
Ilya Loskutov's user avatar
-1 votes
3 answers
228 views

Is "She has as long hair as mine" a correct sentence?

Is this sentence correct and natural to you? She has as long hair as mine. If this is not correct or natural, why?
Kosuke's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
4 answers
647 views

Is 'a coffee' correct? [duplicate]

My knowledge says coffee is uncountable unless it's used in such a context like 'a cup of coffee' or 'a blend of Argentinian and Brazilian coffees' which are one of the best delicious things in the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
53 views

"they'd"/"there'd" be too much of "a distraction"/"distraction"?

What sentence is correct? 1 They'd be too much of a distraction. 2 They'd be too much of distraction. 3 There'd be too much of a distraction. 4 There'd be too much of distraction.
Stats Cruncher's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
85 views

three foods & three pieces of food

as far as I know: In the UK "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a fruit". In the USA "an item of fruit" can be replaced with "a piece of fruit". For ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,753
0 votes
2 answers
105 views

Are plural-only and singular-only nouns always uncountable?

As far as I understand, based on the literal meanings of the words "countable" and "uncountable": A noun is called countable when it can be counted, i.e. can be used with cardinal ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,753
1 vote
2 answers
809 views

counting an uncountable noun : chicken

I learned that sometimes I can count uncountable things in such a sentence like this: "I like this coffee much more than other coffees." Then, can I count pieces of chicken saying like this? ...
Nigutumok's user avatar
  • 556
2 votes
1 answer
385 views

Is the noun "time" always uncountable?

such long time such a long time I know that (time) is an uncountable noun but I'm a bit confused because I heard many people saying such a long time so which of them is correct?
Kirollos Aziz's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
492 views

This is mashed potatoes or These are mashed potatoes

This question arose in the discussion of a language learning app. Its original sentence is in Russian and it says Это пюре а вот пицца. The translation from the app is This is mashed potatoes and ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,012
0 votes
2 answers
871 views

I had a hard time vs I had hard times

I always don't understand how I can count time. In what situation can I use "a hard/good time" or "hard/good times"? Could you please show me examples of sentences, or explanations ...
Nigutumok's user avatar
  • 556
1 vote
2 answers
1k views

in the sentence "there is 2 litres of milk" is 2 litres countable or uncountable?

Is "2 litres" in the above sentence a countable noun? I have had mixed answers for this question. Some say yes, and some, no. I have read articles, but none give me any clear answer. ...
kavish Bhardwaj's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
269 views

Is the word "foods" countable or uncountable?

Sentence: Whole foods means food that's in its original form, straight from nature, typically whole fruits, veggies, whole grains, et cetera. I want to know why "means" not "mean" ...
erika999's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
776 views

Should I use prices in the following sentence

The prices of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. or The price of books sold online are cheaper than those in the local bookstores. Or if both are correct and it's ...
jxhyc's user avatar
  • 229
0 votes
3 answers
973 views

Is it correct to use ''scores of (something)'' with uncountable nouns?

''Score of something'' means ''a lot of something.'' Although it is correct to use ''a lot of'' with uncountable nouns, I've never seen an example of ''scores of something'' used with an uncountable ...
user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is "fruit" used as a countable or uncountable noun?

I don't know if "fruit" works as a singular or a plural in these cases: HOW MANY fruit(s) or HOW MUCH fruit do you eat a day? Today I have had three fruit(s).
zenith3's user avatar
  • 947
-2 votes
1 answer
46 views

Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? [closed]

Is there a grey area between substance noun and object noun? I mean, are there any English words that mean ‘substance or object’? If so, should I use an indefinite article, or not?
user09827's user avatar
  • 305
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

The list of uncountable nouns that never take 'a/an'

There is a rule not use the article ‘a’ with uncountable nouns. Unless, we talk about a particular kind of the uncountable noun. For example, ‘a dreadful anger’, ‘a fragile calm’, ‘a great enthusiasm’ ...
Olek's user avatar
  • 161

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