Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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4
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1answer
274 views

Why “desert” in the following examples are used as uncountable?

Below are some dictionary examples in which the noun desert is used as an uncountable: this area of the country is mostly desert (Longman) drought and deforestation are turning fragile ...
4
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2answers
7k views

Verb for two uncountable items

What verb form should I use when talking about two uncountable items? Which of these sentences is correct? 1.There are lightning and thunder. 2.There is lightning and thunder.
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3answers
5k views

Countable and uncountable nouns

I just asked some question and I have another one and this one is more unsettling to me than the previous one. So, how can you tell which nouns are countable and uncountable? I understand you cannot ...
4
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2answers
16k views

When do I say "food" or "foods"?

As I have read that the noun "food" is generally uncountable, I am not quite sure when I should use "food" as a countable noun. For instance, Chicken and rice are food or Chicken and rice are ...
4
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1answer
133 views

Missing article in this construction involving an uncountable noun

In this YouTube video from 1:00 to 1:06 the following sentence is said: I can take anything that inspires me and make it part of our music. Should there be the indefinite article a before part? Is ...
4
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2answers
695 views

Can different languages "have different grammars", or do they "differ in their grammar"?

I became curious why in English grammar lacks an article in this Wikipedia page: The subjunctive mood in English grammar includes particular verb forms that are used in certain clauses, chiefly ...
4
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1answer
37 views

You can buy these from the supermarket. / ...supermarkets

Question: Where can I buy these cakes? Answer 1-You can buy these from the supermarket. (to refer to any supermarkets) Answer 2-You can buy these from supermarkets. I think that we can say ".........
4
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2answers
3k views

"These" with uncountable nouns

I know that "These" can only be followed by plural nouns. ex: These flowers are beautiful. My questions are: Can I use multiple uncountable nouns after "These"? ex: These milk, butter, and bread ...
4
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1answer
522 views

Disconnect (the / zero article) power before attempting to repair electrical equipment

Could you please advise which article should be used in the below sentence? I and my friend are doing an exercise of filling suitable article(s) (a / an / the / no article) into the blank of the ...
4
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2answers
4k views

"Why didn't you buy some [or any] cheese?"

As I know some is used for positive sentences and any for negative as well as question forms. But what about negative questions? Why didn't you buy any cheese? or Why didn't you buy some ...
4
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1answer
2k views

News for plural

I am aware that news is singular and uncountable, so I cannot say it is a great news, for instance. If someone tells me a piece of news I say That's great news. But and if someone tells me two ...
4
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2answers
3k views

Interest VS interests in THIS phrase

I understand the concept of countables and uncountables in interest(s). Engineering and Math interest me. Books interest him. His interests include sports. he only seeks his own interests. ...
4
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1answer
633 views

Indefinite articles before non-count nouns

Sometimes, I am confused with uncountable nouns. As far as rules are concerned, we can't use an indefinite article before a non-count noun. But at times we break the rules when it follows an adjective....
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3answers
1k views

How to ‘guess’ if a noun is countable or uncountable?

Not all the time I have access to dictionaries. In school, I learned that abstract nouns are not countable; however, English is an ever-evolving language and nothing can be so certain here including ...
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3answers
32k views

Money - Countable or Uncountable noun

This page suggests that we use much with only uncountable nouns whereas the use of many/several is limited to countable nouns only. So I conclude that money is uncountable noun as I've heard people ...
3
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6answers
34k views

"making noise" or "make a noise"?

I was beginning to get confused on this sentence structure. I wager a noise is not singular or is it? Stop making a noise Stop making noise Which of these is a good way to present this situation?...
3
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2answers
4k views

Collective noun query: "A fleet of cars are parked."

Which of the following is correct according to the rule of collective nouns: A fleet of cars are parked. A fleet of car are parked. A fleet of car is parked.
3
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2answers
409 views

Do you need help (or _a_ help) in Biology or Chemistry? Join our Tutoring Club! (article use)

Am I right to think the following announcement wrong in its use of the indefinite article? Do you need a help in Biology or Chemistry? Consider joining our Friday Chemistry and Biology Tutoring ...
3
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3answers
229 views

"legal protection" vs "legal protections"

The following is an example from the Cambridge dictionary: The proposed law is intended to provide legal protections for farm workers. What would be the difference between "protection" and ...
3
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2answers
7k views

Without (the / no article) air and water, living things could not survive

Could you please advise whether I should use definite article 'the' in the below sentence? I'm helping my little sister with an exercise of filling suitable article(s) into the blank of the sentence: ...
3
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3answers
213 views

When to use the uncountable form of a noun?

I understand that certain nouns are both uncountable and countable at the same time. Some of these nouns have different meanings in different form so choosing which form to use is relatively easy. ...
3
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3answers
6k views

"There is a fog." Is the noun used correctly?

My kid saw the scene and told me, There is a fog. Do we use "a" before fog?
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2answers
69 views

countable counterpart of "fruit"

I was taught that the noun "fruit" is non-countable in English. If so, then what would be its countable counterpart? I am sure there should be one because the need for that is quite practical. Let'...
3
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2answers
751 views

How can "curiosity" be countable

I've seen the phrase "A curiosity about the incident." I do understand the curisosity has to do with the incident, but how can curiosity be countable in the first place? Can I also say a hatred ...
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2answers
19k views

should it be ice cream or ice creams?

Should the term ice cream, in the sentence below, be countable or uncountable? The bowl consists of mini scoops of chocolate, vanilla and strawberry ice cream. The bowl consists of mini ...
3
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1answer
44k views

A lot of experience or a lot of experiences?

When I'm in a job review, and I want to say that I'm experienced in something, what is the correct form to say it? (Of course, except of "I am experienced" etc.) 1) I have a lot of experiences ...
3
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1answer
5k views

"worth the effort" vs. "worth the efforts"

Is the noun used "differently" in "worth the effort" vs. "worth the efforts" ? According to Merriam-Webster, effort has the following 5 definitions - conscious exertion of power : hard work a ...
3
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1answer
111 views

Is technology a mass noun?

I am wondering if the sentence below is correct: The company transferred critical 5G technologies to one of its partners in order to make it's supply chain more efficient. Can you also use it ...
3
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4answers
293 views

Using "fashion" countably vs. uncountably: "in (a) timely/similar/dramatic fashion"

I have always thought fashion is countable when used to signify a particular manner (e.g., I will get that done in a timely fashion), but I just encountered these sentences in the Oxford Dictionaries (...
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4answers
35k views

Can we use 'availabilities' as the plural of 'availability'?

If -s/es can be added to a noun (to form a plural noun), then we understand that it's a countable noun. Is the noun availabilities the plural form of the noun availability? If it's not so, then how ...
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2answers
64k views

The furniture is/are

The furniture in our classroom ___ uncomfortable. Should I use is or are here? I found on the internet things like all of furniture is and house full of furniture is. But nothing about my example. ...
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1answer
3k views

Search of fertile land or lands?

In this youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=40&v=iWDKsHm6gTA It says: Groups of people that shared a single language and culture often split into smaller tribes, going ...
3
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1answer
42k views

Is "money" considered singular or plural? [duplicate]

I am writing this sentence: If you have anyone here, I can give it to him/her, and he/she will transfer them to you. Have I used them correctly in that sentence, or have I should have said it? ...
3
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1answer
54 views

Should I use an article in “extract text from document” phrases?

I am writing an article about the extraction of an entire text from a document. I am not sure if I should use "a", "the", or nothing in "extract text" phrases. Sample sentences: "How to extract text ...
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3answers
512 views

How much shrimps?

if i want to ask about the amount of shrimps that a person eats (kilograms) per year, should i ask How many shrimps do you eat? - > I eat 1 kilo a year. Or maybe I should ask How much ...
3
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1answer
196 views

how much deposit?

Dictionaries typically say the noun deposit is countable, but a Google search shows there are some instances of "how much deposit" on some British and Australian sites. Do you think it's natural to ...
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2answers
2k views

"Companies will increase their capacity" or "capacities"

Companies will increase their production capacity in 2017. Companies will increase their production capacities in 2017. A Google search shows that "capacity" is more common. But I wonder, would ...
3
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1answer
66 views

noun phrase or not subsumed into the word snow

Do you say (1) "There was three feet of snow" or (2) "There were three feet of snow" when referencing the amount of snow and NOT three-feet made of snow! I.e. is the phrase "...
3
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2answers
668 views

‘A fried rice’, ‘ fried rice’, or ‘ a bowl of fried rice’

I came across this sentence in an English book: A fried rice is 2,500 dong. I know that rice is a mass noun so it cannot be counted, and if ‘fried rice’ refers to the name of a dish, it is correct ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Does "begin work" sound natural?

I came across a line in a book: The indigotin would be dissolved in vats of alkali to make a yellowish dye, indigo white. It was then ready for the dyers to begin work. Begin work here sounds ...
3
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2answers
182 views

beat somebody to 'a' pulp ( why is pulp countable here?)

I just stumbled over this phrase and I'd like to know why the rule of countable/uncountable nouns doesn't seem to apply here? Pulp is not a countable unit.
3
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4answers
13k views

Usage of "any" or "some" in "Would you like ..... wine?" [duplicate]

I have got another test question: Would you like ..... wine? any some This test assumes that the only correct answer is 'some' and some people argue that the use of 'any' in this ...
3
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1answer
116 views

Is 'subject-predicate form' to be used as countable or uncountable noun?

Willard Quine writes about Kant's formulation of an analytic statement that 'it limits itself to statements of subject-predicate form'. In this context I want to ask a question about the form - what ...
3
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1answer
457 views

Gerund supporting or Noun support

I ran into this sentence yesterday and I am wondering whether or not I could change support to supporting. In short, labor's support among the public is heavily concentrated among Democrats. For ...
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3answers
3k views

How do we know when we use an article with uncountable nouns?

English has countable nouns and uncountable nouns. But I sometimes see the use of article with uncountable nouns in a sentence like 'we have an utmost importance'. Here is an example. I bring up, ...
3
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1answer
695 views

Usage of "much" instead of "many" with countable noun (e.g. Americans)

I found the sentence below in the GMAT exam preparation book: However much Americans may agree that the financing of elections with special interest money undermines democracy and that campaign ...
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8answers
2k views

Is it 'oils' or 'oil'?

In this sentence, is oil allowed (mass noun) or should it be oils? Hurry and get your hands on any of our premium Shell engine oil/oils and get a free cleaner at a great price! (This sentence would ...
2
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3answers
110 views

"he is out of touch and incapable of rescuing Russia from crisis" -- why not "from a crisis"? -- which is grammatically more correct?

Example with a context: Putin and his allies blame the economic problems on what they call external factors, principally the West. Others, including former allies who worked with him, say he is out ...
2
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2answers
35k views

Is "funds" a plural or singular noun?

The dictionary enlists it as "fund," but the word "funds" is used quite often and it means money (Ok, it can have other meanings as well. I get that) Do I say, then, how much funds did the ...
2
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1answer
235 views

Can "potion" be uncountable?

I don't understand why all dictionaries say "potion" is countable. That is we can not say "he drank some potion". Normally, a witch boils/makes a pot of potion. And then she just ...

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