Questions tagged [uncountable-nouns]

For questions about nouns that are viewed as a "mass" or "whole" that cannot be counted or separated. These nouns usually aren't used in the plural, with the indefinite article ("a" or "an"), or with numbers.

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44 views

Name is countable or uncountable?

Let's say I'm writing a story and there's a character named Jim and he sees 10 identical people who have similarities with his friend Emily, in fact, they look exactly like Emily. What would Jim ...
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2answers
550 views

Isn't "fog" uncountable when referring to a weather phenomenon?

I came across an example sentence on Merriam Webster: a climate marked by heavy fogs Isn't fog a noncount noun when used to refer to weather, according to the Cambridge Dictionary. The ODO and the ...
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2answers
12k views

"Any correction" or "any corrections": Are they interchangeble?

I know that the noun "correction" is both countable, meaning a change that makes something more accurate than it was before, and uncountable, meaning the act or process of correcting something. When I ...
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1answer
59 views

Why no article?

I'm a university student of English and we are studying "Articles" in our grammar module. Our teacher gave us this sentence, "You have egg on your tie." And asked us why we haven't used an article. ...
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1answer
1k views

paddy field - is it countable or uncountable noun?

In some areas, **some fields could be found among the river, houses, etc. Could I say "some paddy fields"?
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1answer
373 views

can we say "a much"?

My new phone has a much longer battery life. The sentence is copied from Cambridge dictionary. Why they have used “a” with uncountable noun "life"? Also can we write "a much"? We use much with ...
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1answer
2k views

The pronoun of the word "data"

I wrote: Web data extraction is the process of seeking and finding data on the Web, then extracting them/it from Web sources, and transforming them/it into structured data I know "data" is plural ...
2
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1answer
35 views

has good reason vs has a good reason

Tom has good reason to be angry. Tom may well be angry. My textbook says that the above two sentences are the same. What is the meaning of "reason" above?
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1answer
43 views

'at very high altitude', 'at very high altitudes': both are okay in this sentence?

I'd like to know and ask whether both the sentences below are correct. At very high altitude you will have difficulty breathing. At very high altitudes you will have difficulty breathing. My ...
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3answers
143 views

The building was destroyed by (a) fire

The building was destroyed by a fire. The building was destroyed by fire. I have almost always used “fire” as an uncountable noun. What’s the difference between the two sentences? Which example is a ...
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4answers
718 views

A fish\Two fish\Two fishes [duplicate]

Do I understand the next right? I caught a fish It will mean I just caught some fish in quantity of one. I caugh two fish Means I caught two fish that are of the same species I caught two fishes I ...
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3answers
243 views

Uncountable and countable

All the major dictionaries say that exercise, when denotes a physical activity, is an uncountable noun. Swimming is good exercise. (OALD) Cycling to work is good exercise. (Cambridge ...
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1answer
81 views

Neutral accent or a neutral accent (countable or not)

In the context of the sentence below, which should be applied so it's grammatical. The only thing that is good about our country (as a single noun) is our spoken English, we've got neutral accent. ...
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1answer
41 views

The countability of "memoir" and "stocktaking" in this sentence

I find two nouns in this sentence from a Time article very strange. The Atlantic columns are enriched with personal memoir, and a stocktaking, as Coates takes the reader through his own life and ...
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2answers
83 views

any reason behind writing looks are?

I know that the noun looks usually takes plural form, eg: Her looks are deceptive. But since looks is an uncountable noun, why does it take a plural verb? Shouldn't it be treated like the other ...
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2answers
664 views

In the sentence of concern, should I use the plural form of the noun?

If you like a song, and you think it's catchy, could you say this? Songs don't get much catchier than this. My concern is the plural songs, when people say things similar to Life can't/doesn't ...
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1answer
336 views

Listing differnet kinds of an uncoutable noun. Are they countable or uncountable?

How do you I refer to different kind of an uncountable noun? For example, this is a part of my writing: Using oil (coconut oil, olive oil) to moisturize your skin after bath. Those oil... I want ...
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2answers
218 views

Is the usage _a chalk piece_ acceptable in modern English?

Most teachers in India say chalk piece or a chalk piece instead of a piece of chalk. I know that chalk is uncountable and the correct usage is a piece of chalk. But I have read in certain books ...
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1answer
250 views

Is there not much sugar and many candies in the shop?

I had such a sentence: Are there not much sugar and candies in the shop? And I was confuseed with "are".On the one hand it should be "are" for we combine "sugar" = "it" and "candies" = they ...
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3answers
671 views

Why is "bad news seemS" and not "bad news seem"?

In an online English test I found that "bad news seem" is wrong, the correct would be "bad news seems" as in the sentence: Bad news seems to be more attractive than good news. I'm considering ...
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2answers
176 views

Is "profit" a special case?

Company profits are down from last year's figures. (Copied from Cambridge dictionary.) 1) Why don't we use a possessive s? 2) Why do we use plural profits? 3) Why don't we use “the”? When you ...
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3answers
147 views

Does this noun phrase (a variable name) take a singular or plural verb?

I'm writing a codebook that defines variables in a data set. Should the verb of the following sentence be singular or plural (refer/refers)? (Note that the italics appear in original; they are, ...
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1answer
193 views

Is it "human and physical capitals" or "human and physical capital"?

I am writing an essay that has this clause: Due to the flight of human and physical capitals as a result of lower transportation costs,... It gave me a pause because I realize "capital" in this ...
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2answers
707 views

Which auxiliary verb or copular to refer to uncountable nouns?

If we take uncountable noun (or "mass noun") such as toothpaste which is marked in the dictionary as uncountable, then which auxiliary verb / copular (is / are) I have to use in the following ...
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1answer
293 views

Many nouns that can sometimes be countable and others uncountable [closed]

I really have a problem using such as these following nouns , disagreement, balance and alteration...etc . Because sometimes they can be considered countable and othertime uncountable. So how can i ...
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2answers
655 views

Is a noun 'Lyrics' a mass noun?

Additional information: According to the source a noun 'lyrics' as text of a song it isn't a mass noun; It means that it has singular and plural cases for such noun, but according to its examples ...
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3answers
192 views

Test question: The {people | peoples} of Europe are white-skinned [duplicate]

This question is from a test: The {people | peoples} of Europe are white-skinned. Which is correct? Can we use either?
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2answers
106 views

How to count consciousness?

I'm afraid I'm talking about my favourite topic, consciousness, wrong. Can you please check which of these cases of my trying to use the word on Reddit are correct? "Quantum wave form collapses ...
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1answer
4k views

"Police is" or "police are"? [duplicate]

I am aware that we alway treat the police as singular when we refer to it as social instutution. But what about if are refering to police as a group of people who are policemen? For example: There ...
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1answer
596 views

The police or police [duplicate]

He must have called the police. OR He must have called police. I think we use the first one when we know about a specific group of police officers which we have called and the second one, when, ...
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2answers
1k views

Countable/uncountable “judgement” vs. “evidence”

These procedures may be based on ∅ objective, scientific evidence or on a more subjective, aesthetic judgment. Here, “judgment” is countable, but “evidence” is not. For native speakers this might ...
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3answers
13k views

Which sentence is wrong?

I was doing an English test and I don't know how to answer this question. Which one of these sentences is correct? a) Could you give me an information, please? b) I have bought an interesting ...
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1answer
89 views

Should I place an article before "20/20 vision"?

Having (a) 20/20 vision is the desirable condition of the eye. If you have (a) 20/20 vision you don't need glasses. (A) 20/20 vision is required for certain job positions. Is the article "a"...
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2answers
133 views

How do native speakers distinguish countable nouns from uncountable nouns?

As an English learner (I'm Chinese), I've always been confused by the concept of countable and uncountable nouns. For example, I understand why "water" is uncountable, but why is “paper” ...
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2answers
138 views

Indefinite article before uncountable nouns

Please help me understand why the indefinite article is used in this case: "I had a marvellous time!"
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1answer
804 views

Why can "core" be a plural form of "core"?

According to WordHippo: The noun core can be countable or uncountable. In more general, commonly used, contexts, the plural form will also be core. However, in more specific contexts, ...
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2answers
2k views

“paint”: mass noun vs count noun

Jackson Pollock dropped paints on canvas seemingly at random. (Source) I have always thought the noun "paint" is uncountable when referring to color/colored liquid/solid pigment. But the above ...
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2answers
399 views

Can I use the word 'one' with the words 'glasses' 'pants' 'scissors' 'shorts'?

Notoriously known as 'only plural' nouns (scissors, pants, shorts, glasses) Question: Can I say (take these one glasses (spectacles), scissors, pants, shorts)?
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2answers
2k views

lemonade - countable or uncountable

Is "lemonade" countable or uncountable? Could I say the following sentence? Could you please bring me a lemonade? Or must I say "a glass of lemonade" ?
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1answer
8k views

Vegetable or vegetables?

The book I'm using writes vegetable in a plural form. I don't think this is correct. Do you like strawberries or lettuce? No. I like neither fruit or vegetables. Should it be written as: ...
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3answers
53 views

How can I count multiple heating?

I found the following sentence: There is too much heating. According to my dictionary, heating is an uncountable noun, so you cannot say heatings. However, it is possible that you have more than ...
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1answer
164 views

"A couple of weights" Is it grammatical to use "weight" as a countable noun?

I heard a line in the movie The Reluctant Fundamentalist Looks like you picked up a couple of weights, too, huh? The speaker of this line apparently suggests that the other party has gained weight....
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2answers
3k views

Why is mess used with article?

I looked in the Cambridge Dictionary and mess is an uncountable. I wonder why mess is used with 'a'? He makes a terrible mess when he's cooking. I look a mess
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1answer
26 views

Can we use 'one' after uncountable nouns?

For example, is it possible to say the following: 'Music degraded from a very good one to a bad one' If not, what's the natural way to say it? Many thanks!
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3answers
825 views

The word "exercise" as an uncountable noun [duplicate]

Swimming is good exercise. Swimming is a good exercise. I checked all the major dictionaries and they say that it is uncountable when it means (physical or mental activity that you do to stay healthy ...
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1answer
1k views

it’s a pleasure meeting you or it’s pleasure meeting you.Why do we put the article’a’ when pleasure is an abstract and uncountable noun?

How to use uncountable nouns as countable nouns? Here pleasure is abstract noun and how to identify uncountable nouns as countable nouns according to situations?
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2answers
3k views

Is "bit of oil" countable or uncountable?

If it is countable why do we say a little bit of oil and can I say the following? a little quantity of seeds
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1answer
824 views

Can a material noun be countable?

I get stuck to differentiate between some common and material noun. Can material noun be countable? Are egg, earth, nail, sun and moon material nouns? when can I use article in front of a ...
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2answers
463 views

Is the use of "supermarket" the same as the one of "school / jail / prison / court / church"?

Oxford Dictionary says that When a school is being referred to as an institution, you do not need to use the: When do the children finish school? When you are talking about a particular ...
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2answers
63 views

Is it okay to use "software" after version number?

The possible functional effect of the single nucleotide variations (SNVs) was assessed using the PolyPhen-2 v1.3.5 software. Since "software" is a noncount noun, and "v1.3.5" clearly indicates a ...

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