Questions tagged [verb-usage]

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The woman pulled back the curtain to disclose the hidden parrot

I am studying a group of synonyms, and have an impression, that ChatGPT gives me the wrong answers. For example, I suspect that this sentence does not sound idiomatic: The woman pulled back the ...
sanya6's user avatar
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6 votes
5 answers
534 views

Meaning of the verb "authenticate" in contexts

Here is a sentence from Cambridge Dictionary: They used carbon dating tests to authenticate the claim that the skeleton was 2 million years old. Does the sentence imply that the authentication was ...
Vova's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
129 views

They built a wall to avoid soil being washed away. - Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

They built a wall to avoid soil being washed away. - Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary I think it is better to say They built a wall to prevent/stop soil from being washed away. “Prevent” is used ...
joy2020's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
62 views

How common is the verb "wear down" and what proficiency level does it correspond to?

I would like to know how common the phrasal verb "wear somebody down" is in English. Additionally, I'm curious about the proficiency level at which it is usually taught or considered ...
Ali Ent's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
159 views

Correct usage of as well as and the usage of pronoun with as well as

Which sentence is grammatical? 1) He as well as I were invited to the party. 2) He as well as me was invited to the party. Almost all books seem to suggest that the verb should agree with the first of ...
Modern English's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
225 views

I wish he would come. vs. I wished he would come

I wish he would come. Does this sentence imply there is still a chance to come for him? I wished he would come. Does this sentence imply he didn't come in the past? The only difference is wish vs. ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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5 votes
3 answers
981 views

I’d rather come or go with you

I’d rather come with you. I'd rather go with you. Is there any difference between them? I think 'come' has the opposite meaning of 'go'
gomadeng's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
1k views

What are usages of "Get to + noun" and "Get to + verb"?

I attempted to categorize the various usages of the phrase 'get to' for a better understanding, but got difficulties due to the scattered information. Would you be able to assist me in organizing the ...
Rodrigo's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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They swindled hundreds of dollars out of him. vs. swindled him out of hundreds of dollars

They swindled hundreds of dollars out of him. vs. They swindled him out of hundreds of dollars. The question is 'swindle sb out of sth' vs. 'swindle sth out of sb' Why the two sentences above make ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
200 views

added vs included

Which is more appropriate: xyz feature is included in the abc website OR xyz feature is added to the abc website when talking about a new software release?
Kata's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
59 views

I loved her when I first saw her

Is the following sentence okay? Does the "love" mean "fall in love with"? I loved her when I first saw her.
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is this use of the verb 'tell' correct?

Is this use of the verb 'tell' correct? Suppose we have this situation. Mary tells Jack to wait at home until she comes back. Can I say this? Jack waited at home as told. I'm also in doubt whether ...
Fra's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
19 views

What does the verb ''have' mean here? [duplicate]

In this following definition does the verb ''have'' play in causative meaning? or what? Please, simplify it to me... for oneself (idiom): rather than have someone else (do or share something) She ...
Sakya Kim's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
111 views

need to do VERSUS need for doing

I know "need to do" is correct. I need to read this article. Sometimes I come across "need for doing" I see no need for doing it. Incidentally, I wonder if "need for doing&...
user1425's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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The rate for a room is £30, but breakfast is extra.(the verb "be" as "exist")

The rate for a room is £30, but breakfast is extra. The verb "is" in the sentence above means "exists", thus, extra is an adverb?
gomadeng's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
80 views

The terms have been agreed. vs. The terms have been agreed to

The terms have been agreed. vs. The terms have been agreed to. The verb 'agree' is used as 'transitive or intransitive'. I wonder which sentence is more common: with 'to' or without 'to' in case of ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
161 views

What does "would like to have + v3" mean? [closed]

I would like to have them removed but the process is a little confusing. I would like to have it deleted, but do not know the procedure. I would like to have saved it, obviously, but the game was on ...
Abdullah Al Mamun's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
45 views

The phrasal verb "go off"

If a sound goes off, does it mean the sound starts or the sound starts and lasts for some time? In other words, can I say "an alarm was going off all night"?
Vova's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
40 views

If I was there, I am not alive now or I would not be alive now.(indicative or subjunctive usage) [closed]

If I was there yesterday, I am not alive now or I would not be alive now. If I had been there yesterday, I am not alive now or I would not be alive now. Which one between 1 and 2 is more widely used ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
111 views

How to use 'wish + noun' for myself?

I have this confusion when I am trying to construct a sentence concerning the usage of the verb wish. I've tried to look up dictionaries, but I'm still perplexed because it has a lot of options. ...
user516076's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
234 views

What's the difference between verbs "spot" and "see"? What verb fom follows them?

How does a differ from c, and b from d? a. John spotted Bill enter the house. b. John saw Bill enter the house. c. John spotted Bill entering the house. d. John saw Bill entering the house.
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
68 views

Does the word "Yahoo" have a verb meaning?

Reading this article, I noticed a fun expression saying, "DO YOU, UH. YAHOO?" Checking it on the Internet, I found several sites quoting the wording. From the context in the article, what ...
Takashi's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
277 views

Is "give" or "gives" the correct way in this case? [closed]

I am trying to understand what form is correct in this sentence. "Full access" gives/give permission to see the report about scheduled hours. For context, we are explaining what "full ...
Castberg's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
186 views

Is it correct to use "derive from" in the following context?

According to dictionaries, "to derive" means "to get something from something else" and "to come from something". But I'm not sure if it can be used in the following ...
Bold70's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
246 views

treat with the enemy for peace (is this phrase idiomatic?)

treat with the enemy for peace 'treat' is used like: treat people with respect I wonder if the phrase above is idiomatic or not.
gomadeng's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
286 views

She’d come off her new bike and hurt her knee. (she'd) [closed]

She’d come off her new bike and hurt her knee. before you see and hurt her knee. What was the intrepretation of 'she'd' when you (as native English speakers) first read the sentence above? she ...
gomadeng's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
92 views

object of "refill": food or container?

I think "refill" as a verb only takes containers such as cups and bowls as objects. However, I am wondering whether it can take food as objects. Could we say "refill one's rice, beer, ...
Apollyon's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
314 views

Overtake, cut off usage

I have two questions: Relating to the usage of the word 'overtake'. Is this word common in colloquial English? If I say 'I overtook the truck in front of me', does this sound unnatural or very formal ...
userJu's user avatar
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14 votes
3 answers
6k views

Which is more appropriate? "I was married" OR "I have been married"?

Suppose, we're (I and my wife) asked by people how long our marriage is since we got married. Which tense should I use? Past tense or perfect tense or else? We were married for 15 years. We've been ...
user516076's user avatar
  • 5,012
2 votes
2 answers
65 views

Using the verb "fix" in the following context

I made up the sentence: A and B agreed to meet each other at 8 a.m. tomorrow to sign the contract. How to express this sentence idiomatically using the verb "fix" instead of "agree&...
Vova's user avatar
  • 309
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

meaning of "braced for more sobbing" [closed]

This passage is from The Children's Bach by Helen Garner someone laughed up high, there was a scuffling somewhere in the house, Dexter was up, he would see to it. Her muscles let go and she was away. ...
Viser Hashemi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
59 views

"You must not forget ..... (turn) off your stove, it's very dangerous."

I saw this fill in the blanks question on my practice book and it left me confused You must not forget ..... (turn) off your stove, it's very dangerous. For the book, answer is to turn. My answer ...
Shadow Bender Panda's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
71 views

The committee split over government subsidies. (split-split-split)

The committee split over government subsidies. How can I make clear the meaning of the sentence in case I want to differentiate 'present form of split' from 'past form of split'?
gomadeng's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
644 views

arrange a party vs arrange for a party (Is there any difference?)

arrange a party vs arrange for a party (Is there any difference?) The verb 'arrange' can be transitive or intransitive. Is there any difference? There is another example: arrange an appointment vs ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,306
0 votes
2 answers
401 views

What's the common verb to describe a rainbow?

For whatever reason, I had in mind that the common verb used to describe a rainbow's "state" is bent, as in "a rainbow bent over the landscape". However, I just Googled "...
HeyJude's user avatar
  • 137
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Thrive-throve-thriven vs thrive-thrived-thrived

thrived vs throve Could they be different in their usage? There are two forms of inflection: ed-ed (regular) vs. irregular (like drink-drank-drunk) When native speakers use the verbs as past which ...
gomadeng's user avatar
  • 4,306
-2 votes
1 answer
53 views

How to use the verb "assume" in the following situation?

I am a secret agent pretending to be Donald Trump. Which is the correct way to express that using the verb "assume"? I assume Donald. I assume the name of Donald. I assume the name "...
Vova's user avatar
  • 309
0 votes
2 answers
147 views

Is 'wet' only meant to be used for water and watery substances?

Today I stumbled upon this question: "If you dip a glass rod in water it gets wet while if you dip that same rod in Mercury it doesn't. Give reason." I know that's a physics question and I ...
lee's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
39 views

Meaning and usages of "short circuit" as a verb

What is the meaning of "short circuits" as a verb in the following sentence: Technology short circuits this thinking by making the problems obsolete. Is this use formal and where it can be ...
Rwy5's user avatar
  • 123
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

How to use "soak"?

Which is incorrect? I soaked the beans overnight. The beans was soaked overnight. The beans soaked overnight.
Vova's user avatar
  • 309
-1 votes
1 answer
54 views

"An arm bruises" vs "an arm is bruised"

Which is incorrect? I have bruised my arm. My arm has bruised. My arm has been bruised. My arm got bruised.
Vova's user avatar
  • 309
1 vote
2 answers
93 views

Move off/Head off/Leave

Tom is at a party, hanging at the bar. A guy he knows, Matt, comes up to him to say hi. They talk, then - Matt: Well, it's good to see you again. Enjoy the party. Tom: Thank you. Matt moves off/heads ...
Englishmaster's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
195 views

would have usage

I know that the usage of would have carries two main meanings: one is often paired with but, say, I would have loaned you the money, but I didn’t have any; the other is used in conditional sentences ...
Raymond's user avatar
  • 39
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

Trained ECDL or taught ECDL

Which verb is better to use: He trained ECDL to them last year. or He taught ECDL to them last year. P.S: ECDL stands for European Computer Driving License
Lipton's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
1 answer
19 views

"Manage the summer heat" or "manage with the summer heat"?

Could you tell me if I have to include with in the following question? How do you manage (with) the summer heat, especialy when it's scorching hot days on end? What I am trying to aks is how the ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
81 views

Is it natural and correct to say "I can't feel my fingerst" meaning my fingers are numb?

Is it natural and correct to say I can't feel my fingerst meaning my fingers are numb? For example: I guess I had better go to the doctor. I can't feel my fingers at all. If it doesn't sound right,...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
298 views

Verbs for pliers?

What are verbs for pliers? Like, can it be a verb? Such as they "pliers" something. Or, do one use pliers to clip, tweeze, pince, grip, or slam something? I am not even sure if these are proper ...
Superuser's user avatar
  • 731
2 votes
1 answer
41 views

Can the verb "kick start" be used in this sentence? Kick-start your skills in just 1 month

Can the verb "kick start" be used in this sentence? Kick-start your skills in just 1 month Context: Let's say I want to invite somebody to take a 1-month course and improve his/her skills. I want to ...
English Lerneriene's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
26 views

way to say a woman had been runing to the house and now near the house

I have the text which have the "run to" construction: I held my breath as the woman ran to the house. For me the text in up means: "I watched the woman and held my breath in the moment she began ...
ZWA's user avatar
  • 345
0 votes
1 answer
471 views

"shift by 1 day" vs. "shift 1 day later"

I wonder which form(s) are correct amongst the following: All deadlines have been shifted by 1 day due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. All deadlines have been shifted 1 later due to the ongoing ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar