Questions tagged [verb-usage]

The tag has no usage guidance.

9 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
2answers
14k views

"It was broken" vs "It got broken"

When we say "The glass was broken" it means when we looked at it, it had been broken before, that is, it shows a state that could be spread over a period of time. But when we say "it got broken" it ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

"This (should present/show/other) the (best/other) contrast of all"

While posting an answer on UX.stack (then moved to Graphic Design) I found out I wasn't sure about how to express this: The Go button size should be bigger and present the best contrast of all ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

arrange a party vs arrange for a party (Is there any difference?)

arrange a party vs arrange for a party (Is there any difference?) The verb 'arrange' can be transitive or intransitive. Is there any difference? There is another example: arrange an appointment vs ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Move off/Head off/Leave

Tom is at a party, hanging at the bar. A guy he knows, Matt, comes up to him to say hi. They talk, then - Matt: Well, it's good to see you again. Enjoy the party. Tom: Thank you. Matt moves off/heads ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

General term to refer to acquiring knowledge of news or an event

I am trying to find a way to refer to acquiring the knowledge of something new or to be aware of something that recently happened. Usually we can say, I heard on the news... I read on the ...
0
votes
0answers
33 views

On the usage of 'to call'

I cannot recall where exactly but in a book that discussed some common mistakes in English I got to read about why the sentence What is it called in English? is purely (or at least highly) ...
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Use "bridge" as an intransitive verb?

I found the following sentence: The system controller interfaces to the PCI bus and bridges to other buses. I can guess the meaning of it, but looking at all the dictionary the verb "bridge" does ...
0
votes
1answer
110 views

Should [good at something] be understood as active or passive?

I just wrote a psychology quiz and there was a "good at" question that I did not answer correctly. I would like to ask the thread's help on this one. The question was: Is the following a behavior ...
-2
votes
1answer
45 views

How to use the verb "assume" in the following situation?

I am a secret agent pretending to be Donald Trump. Which is the correct way to express that using the verb "assume"? I assume Donald. I assume the name of Donald. I assume the name "...