Questions tagged [verbs]

A verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence.

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2answers
28 views

Using the verb “fluster” intransitively

I was wondering whether Americans use "fluster" intransitively. The only dictionary which introduces the verb as both transitive and intransitive one is "The Free Dictionary" as in:...
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1answer
32 views

Create a verb from of the word “surgeon/surgery”

Is it possible to create a verb from the word "surgery" or "surgeon", which will has the same meaning as "to operate"?
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1answer
17 views

“expose and prosecute claims of fraud”

Is the phrase "claims of fraud" used properly here? To me, "expose and prosecute the fraud" is correct while "expose and prosecute claims of fraud" is wrong because, ...
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1answer
18 views

Removing 'is': which of these sentences is grammatically correct?

The program that performs Tagging is referred to as PoS Tagger and belongs to the group of Natural Language Processing (NLP) applications The program that performs Tagging referred to as PoS Tagger ...
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0answers
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Special usage of verbs - like “to have [some property]” - in sentences

What is the "grammatical category" of "to have" in these contexts? We choose these words to have length at least two. He built this car to have better aerodynamic properties. ...
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1answer
24 views

When to use to-be verb and when to not using to-be verb?

I'm still learning Part of Speech and some tenses, but in the basic, I got confused. Like this, "I work" and "I am Work" Why is the one using "am" and the other one is ...
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27 views

“Repulse” VS “Repel”

I know that the two verbs "repulse" and "repel" both can be used when negative energies are approaching you in the same sense, but I need to know how each word alters the meaning ...
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2answers
72 views

Is “having a baby” or “has a baby” mean she is pregnant?

Read each pair of sentences below, A and B. The sentence which follows each pair is related to one of the sentences in the pair. (For example, it could come after the sentence or describe the sentence....
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1answer
41 views

Is the usage of 'correct' correct here?

I had a conversation with my friend. Me: Thank you for sending this. Friend: Nothing. Me: I have to correct you that your response "nothing" is a kind of Chinglish and a proper one is &...
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9 views

How do I ask different questions which have a word “contribute” properly?

The difficulty is there is a word 'to' between the verb and a noun. A. The three sons also contribute to the family business. When the answer is expected to be the three sons, what are correct ...
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3answers
55 views

Which one is more common: “allow to reduce” or “allow reducing”?

Activation allows (to reduce/ reducing) the temperature of the process. I found that "reducing" can be used after "allow". Moreover, we can write "to reduce" after "...
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2answers
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Can one decide to distract oneself with or by something?

Is it correct to say "The girl he'd been long in love didn't reciprocate so he decided to distract himself with/by her friend and asked her out on a date" ? or "He decided to ...
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1answer
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Can I describe state as action without context?

For example, without context, can I describe the meaning of 'something is in the air' as 'something is going up in the air'?
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1answer
12 views

When practicing parallelism, do I need to include the “to” in infinitives?

For example: He likes to eat, sleep and play. He likes to eat, to sleep and to play. Which of these sentences is parallel? Are they BOTH parallel?
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1answer
18 views

“Trapped” or “To be trapped”

Emergency services attended the scene and found the man trapped in his car. A crew from the State Emergency Service (SES) with the assistance of Fire and Rescue extricated the man from the vehicle ...
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2answers
29 views

(Get / develop) a hunchback

I was wondering which choice is the common way to say that in everyday English speech: I've been breastfeeding for almost 11 months now and my posture (which used to be great) is awful. I am always ...
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1answer
29 views

“Quit” VS “Give up”

As you are aware, the verbs "quit" and "give up" have quite similar meanings and are often used interchangeably in the sense of stopping doing something: I gave up / quit smoking. ...
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2answers
25 views

You might want to/need to consider

You might want to consider quitting your barista job. You might want to spend more time studying and less time playing video games. Q1): I know "you might want to..." means "I suggest/...
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2answers
40 views

Second verb after the simple past

I recently noticed that if the first verb of a sentence is past simple, the second verb must be the base form of the verb. For example: I made her suffer. But I saw the following sentence in my book ...
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0answers
13 views

Start + to have / having

Could anyone possibly let me know whether using the gerund form of the verb "have" after the simple verb "start" is natural and idiomatic English or there is something wrong with ...
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2answers
31 views

“Suspect someone” VS “Be suspicious of someone”

I was wondering whether the words "suspect" as a transitive verbs and the phrasal verb "be suspicious of..." mean the same or not. Example: 1- No one knows who killed her, but ...
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17 views

Some questions about “can (not) help”

It would be highly appreciated that one helps me to find an equivalent for sentences below: In the OALD dictionary, it was written that: "sb can (not) help (doing) sth| sb cannot help but do sth&...
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What part of speech is the word “to” in “I left to get more snacks.”? [duplicate]

I don't think it's a preposition because a verb comes after it. Is it a particle?
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34 views

How does “going to” turn into “will”?

There are a lot of verbs confused me. Have to, going to, would like, etc... For example: If I say "I would like." what does it mean? Want? to like in past tense? And another is If I say &...
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1answer
27 views

why is it right to say “”mark someone's emergence as a crusader"?

The Everglades: River of Grass. Published in 1947, the book educated the nation about the dangers facing one of the most fragile ecosystems and marked its author's emergence as a famous conservation ...
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1answer
37 views

What is the meaning of “call” in “television networks called the election for Joe Biden”?

News media use these kind of expressions of "call" a lot recently. For example the following sentences quoted from NBC News: One side of a deeply divided country is celebrating this weekend....
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2answers
22 views

“propose” without a suggestion

Is "proposes" used properly in the following? The following that-clause is not a suggestion. In his book “Mother Tongue: The English Language”, Bill Bryson states that this richness of ...
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1answer
14 views

Attack + (to / on) (someone / something)

I was wondering which preposition works with the verb "attack"? 1.a- Army forces have been attacking the town since dawn. 1.b- Army forces have been attacking to the town since dawn. 1.c- ...
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2answers
21 views

“Get out” VS “Leak out”

I have stumbled on two phrasal verbs which perhaps mean the same thing. However, I decided to make sure whether they are interchangeable or there is any issue that I need to bear in mind prior to ...
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2answers
35 views

How can I tell the difference between a preposition and a phrasal verb?

For example: "I looked up the word." Some people believe "up" is a particle but others believe that it's a preposition because it's followed by "the word". I'm writing a ...
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1answer
28 views

To read & write is what literacy is

Hope you all are doing well. Please let me know if the following sentence is syntactically correct: The ability, skill and willingness to read & write is what literacy is. Another question is ...
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1answer
25 views

Can we use came for feature

The other day, me and my friend argued about something we both not sure if it’s correct or not, he answered my phone call and spoke to my cousin, my cousin asked about me, “where is mouhanad”, my ...
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1answer
34 views

simple present or present perfect, which one to use and when?

So, to be more specific, I am confused between when to use the simple past tense and when to use the present perfect(has/have)? Based on the context, can anyone please tell me when to use them and how?...
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0answers
21 views

How do you tell when a phrasal verb ends with a preposition?

For example: I looked up the word in the dictionary. I understand that "up" isn't a preposition, but what is the procedure to determine whether a phrasal verb ends in a preposition?
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1answer
26 views

What part of speech is the word “running” in “I kept running”?

What part of speech is the word "running" in "I kept running"? I think it's a noun (gerund) but I'm not totally sure.
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1answer
38 views

“Marry someone” or “Marry to someone”

I was wondering which sentence below is grammatically correct? 1- Before getting to know him, I had so many proposals and I could have married anybody I wanted. But I chose him! 2- Before getting to ...
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0answers
20 views

For someone to + verb

8 minutes for this guy to fall down to earth yet it takes one hour for my Uber eats to be delivered I saw this comment on a video on YouTube and I'd like to know if when I use 'for someone to + verb',...
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2answers
12 views

What is the difference between “Will you get to know” and “Will you know”?

For example, what is the difference between "Will you get to know your daughter" and "Will you know your daughter"? In what situations do you use "get to"?
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1answer
16 views

Pass / hand somebody something

I have come across both of the verbs "pass" and "hand" when people want to ask each other something. For instance, I have heard both sentences below at the table: 1- Please hand ...
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1answer
19 views

“Come across” and “Stumble on”

I am wondering if the verb "stumble on" can be a substitute for "come across" in the following case without any change in the meaning? When I was looking up in the dictionary, I .....
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1answer
62 views

Is it “glowed” or “glown” when conjugating “glow”?

I want to say he's glown with brilliance but the spell checker barks at me for misspelling, like if it prefers glowed. This resource commands the latter, while this one the exact opposite. I've also ...
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1answer
16 views

What is the appropriate answer to this clause?

Woman: Hi, how’s your new job going? Man: I’m trying to ____ with the fact that expecting a perfect job is unrealistic. A. bring it on B. get the news C. say to myself D. come to terms I'm very ...
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1answer
25 views

Is it ok to use “would” for future reference?

Is the below sentence correct:- we would be using these spices from next time onwards. Probably, would is used as past tense for will, but if the above sentence is correct, than why are we using it ...
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1answer
18 views

Why “does” the Extinction occur?

Why does the Extinction occur? Can I place "does" in that position? What is the correct position of does?
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32 views

Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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2answers
292 views

Is war a verb in “If they come to war”?

I remember hearing a sentence in Game of Thrones season 3, it went like: Ser Barristan, if they come to war, kill that one first. Daenerys tells Ser Barristan to kill one of the rude master of ...
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1answer
27 views

Dry + (out / off / up)

I was wondering which choice is correct in each example below: First case: I spilled a glass of water on the table last night, but Candy came by and we left the home immediately so I didn't clean ...
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1answer
18 views

crush + direct object + resultative adjective

I'd like to know whether the verb crush can take a direct object and a resultative adjective. Is the following correct? The rock crushed the driver dead/flat.
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1answer
51 views

“The violence on TV shows are bad for childrens” or “The violence on TV shows is bad for childrens”

I'm confused with these two. Which of them is grammatically correct? "The violence on TV shows are bad for childrens" "The violence on TV shows is bad for childrens" My teacher ...
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1answer
39 views

Drawing/Attracting

Tim completely lost his cool and started yelling at the waitress, drawing/attracting everyone's attention. Two questions: Are both "drawing" and "attracting" okay in a example ...

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