Skip to main content

Questions tagged [verbs]

A verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
8 votes
8 answers
3k views

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

I read a paragraph on Halloween: On November 1, the souls of those who had died were believed to return to visit their homes, and those who had died during the year were believed to journey to the ...
James Mathai's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
274 views

Using "Delight" Without a Preposition

Both the following are commonly used: "to take delight in" and "they delighted in" Recently, I read in an article a usage that was different from these. The author had written, &...
Ammu's user avatar
  • 641
1 vote
3 answers
90 views

Is "fasten" transitive or intransitive in the sentence "He rose, his eyes still fastened on the piece of paper."?

Longman Online Dictionary gives out the following example sentence: He rose, his eyes still fastened on the piece of paper. Source: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fasten-your-eyes-gaze-on-...
Kt Student's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
34 views

Sub verb agreement

Father, mother and children (make/makes) a family. Which verb should I use here, make or makes, as family is a collective noun in singular form?
Pooja Mathew's user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
3k views

"Could" at the beginning of a non-question sentence

The sentence is the following: Could we have found a buyer who would continue operations, I would have certainly preferred to sell the business rather than liquidate it. I can guess the meaning of ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
71 views

Are there any "ditransitive" ergative verbs in English?

By ergative I mean verbs that can undergo alteration such that the object becomes the subject (reducing the number of arguments by one). E.g. She broke the vase. -> The vase broke. Are there ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 626
1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Any difference between dull and blunt in these contexts?

Okay, what I already know is that blunt is transitive verb (E.g. The setback blunted his desire to become an actor.) whereas dull can be both transitive and intransitive (E.g. The setback dulled his ...
S635's user avatar
  • 245
0 votes
1 answer
60 views

Subject + verb + personal object + bare infinitive: Can we follow this same formula for all subjunctive verbs?

My main question was prompted when I realized that there were other cases where subjunctive can be used with other verbs, such as with like, ask, etc. Can we follow this same formula for all ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
36 views

What’s the mood of “wish” in I wish sentences?

So, I have a task to identify the mood of bold verbs. As I understand “wish” in such sentences isn’t included in the Subjunctive mood? Pls help if I’m wrong I wish you would pay attention. (wish – ...
natbv22's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

"Spreading of misinformation" OR "spread of misinformation "

Why is first one wrong . The spreading of misinformation on social media is becoming a serious issue. OR The spread of misinformation on social media is becoming a serious issue.
Ankush's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
57 views

Most of the verbs keep the suffix "e" because were used with the first-person singular in the Middle English

I’m uncertain about the ending "e" in the final form of many verbs.From the ChatGPT response: "The main factor behind the retention of the final "e" in many verbs is indeed ...
Daniel's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
0 answers
30 views

'have got to do' vs. 'have to do' with repeated actions

I still have questions about the difference between 'have got to do' and 'have to do' in case of repeated actions. I understand that 'have got to' is informal spoken British. But there must be other ...
sanya6's user avatar
  • 27
3 votes
2 answers
221 views

'to+verb' vs 'to+be+verb-ing'

"Well, bout time for me to be hitting the ol' dusty trail" - Peter from Family Guy. "Well, bout time for me to hit the ol' dusty trail" - me. (1) Is the 2nd sentence correct ...
Teach_Me_Ingli's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Distancing/hedging expressions

I came across this question in an exam. I believe the option understood is the correct answer because I think after that we need a cluse and a clause cannot begin with to. Am I missing something? The ...
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
49 views

"She nods for him to open the box full of butter biscuits"

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 17) William sits as she reaches into her bag and pulls out a Tupperware box. . . Through the plastic, he recognises his ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,511
2 votes
2 answers
83 views

Is this subject/verb agreement correct?

You are insane if dumb old you wants to do that. You are insane if dumb old you want to do that. You are insane if you want to do that. You are insane if you wants to do that. Which two of these ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

When referring to a large entity (such as an organisation), do we use singular or plural? [duplicate]

Microsoft are forcing people to switch to Windows 11, or Microsoft is forcing people to switch to Windows 11?
roundabout's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

What does "sweeping classical music" mean?

I'm watching the Johny Depp/Amber Heard trial documentary on Netflix and there is a musical composition worked into the footage of a cityscape when a narrator talks about the penthouses he owned and ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
125 views

Verb "to convict" with prepositions

I have a question regarding the use of the verb "to convict" with preposition "on". We can use this verb with the preposition "of" plus a noun or gerund. He was ...
Beqa's user avatar
  • 387
1 vote
2 answers
45 views

What's the meaning of "I’d been to in a long time"?

Though it was the least intelligent movie that I’ve seen this year, it was the most exciting one I’d been to in a long time. I don't understand this portion meaning "I’d been to in a long time&...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
71 views

Is "wrought havoc" the past tense of "work havoc"?

In the book entitled The Webs of Humankind, it says: Introduced crowd diseases wrought havoc for five or six generations (of indigenous peoples). https://www.merriam-webster.com/grammar/do-you-wreak-...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,051
0 votes
1 answer
26 views

What will be the subject verb agreements

They or I ___ responsible for it.
Hazera Begum's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Are they going to put/hold off the wedding till May?

I am trying to translate a dialogue into English. Which is idiomatic: 1. — Are they going to put off the wedding till May? — Yes, they couldn't get it organized any earlier. 2. — Are they going to ...
sanya6's user avatar
  • 27
-1 votes
2 answers
113 views

Why is "could had" incorrect and "could have" correct?

I have recently realised that I have been wrongly using "could had" instead of "could have" It just seems like a popularly accepted fact that "could" cannot be used with ...
nsrCodes's user avatar
  • 117
0 votes
2 answers
58 views

Can a weapon slay a person?

Does the subject of the verb "slew/slay" have to be a person? Consider the following sentence I wrote: Ram then fired an arrow that slew Subahu. Is the above sentence correct? Here, "...
Shoes's user avatar
  • 119
2 votes
2 answers
70 views

How many times can you use “to” before verbs?

If a sentence describes a goal, then how many times should “to” be used there? My goal is to practice conversation and to improve my vocabulary. Or My goal is to practice conversation and improve ...
Alextoo7's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
403 views

When should I use a verb or a gerund/noun after 'to' in English?

I know that the following sentence is grammatically correct: Repetition is key to strengthening your memory. I'm confused about something. I am an intermediate English learner. I had assumed that ...
user avatar
15 votes
4 answers
4k views

What does "zigs when others zag" mean?

From Merriam-Webster's entry for zig zigs when others zag. From Senate rankings: 5 seats most likely to flip: “It’s going to be tough,” one Democratic operative conceded. “But Montana has that ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 4,051
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Would you say "I would like to express my worries ON/IN or ABOUT"?

I know ABOUT is way more common but could you also use: ON? I asked ChatGPT (sorry) this same question and it gave me the following answer: "I would like to express my worries on the current ...
Daniel Costa González's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
27 views

Should I use plural or singular form of verb in those sentences

I'm confused, with those sentences, first I thought I should use GRANTS in all, but in second thought I'm not sure what is the subject of those sentences. Is the word "completing" / "...
Sandra's user avatar
  • 11
4 votes
1 answer
65 views

What does "let go" mean in "lets her hearing aid go"?

This context comes from the movie "Fight Club" (1999). "A foot of concrete is important when your next-door neighbor lets her hearing aid go and has to watch game shows at full volume. ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
482 views

Cut off and cutoff/cut-off

From my understanding: cut off is a verb and cutoff or cut-off is a noun. Am I right? Or is the BBC right? Can "cut off" also be a noun? I am confused because of the following sentences ...
E.V.'s user avatar
  • 399
3 votes
1 answer
609 views

A very complicatedly structured sentence

I was reading Never Split the Difference: Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It when I encountered a very complicatedly structured sentence in the "September 30, 1993" section of ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,581
0 votes
1 answer
131 views

How do you feel ? and How are you feeling?

Why a state verb FEEL is used in How are you feeling? question? I know it has also a dynamic meaning - touch or exemine -but in this question the meaning is different, in`t it
Tatiana Kirova's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is 'teach a school' in this context correct?

I am reading A woman makes a plan: advice for a lifetime of adventure, beauty, and success by Maye Musk, but I've never seen the use of 'teach' in 'teaching this modeling school' in this context: “...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,581
5 votes
4 answers
421 views

Is it ok to write "to term something as something"? If not, how can one use the verb term in this case?

E.g., is the following sentence ok? We term this prompting technique as SuperPrompting. If not, how can one use the verb term in this case? I believe one could use: This prompting technique is ...
Franck Dernoncourt's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
67 views

Using word who with phrases

Can we say "I saw my friend who was parking his car." ? Or is it correct to say "I saw my friend parking his car." ? If both of them are correct so in the second one the relative ...
Amir Dashti's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

Is it correct to use the phrase"be with no access to X"?

Is it correct to say the below? She was hungry for knowledge but with no access to information. Or does it require using the verb, namely: She was hungry for knowledge but had no access to ...
Ania's user avatar
  • 89
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

Why is remain a verb

I was taught a verb "is a doing word" well remain is not doing anything, it is describing the state of not doing anything Prices remain the same She remained seated Standards remain high ...
WendyG's user avatar
  • 2,460
1 vote
0 answers
20 views

...this is what he used to do back in law school. Check me

In the movie "The Wolf Of Wall Street" there is a scene in which one of the friends of the titular Wolf brings him to his friend from college who now runs a big bank in Switzerland in order ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
31 views

As for Wednesday we better meet / met before noon because

(UK English, native: German) I need to make a proposal for an appointment in an E-mail. So far I have suggested some possibilities for Monday and Tuesday and now I would like to offer one last ...
user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
58 views

Do make distance on/get distance on mean the same thing?

Today I've heard "make distance on" in the context on skateboarding. A guy on YouTube was talking about a process of him skating a long and circular rail. He spoke of how it was very hard to ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

The teachers do not allow [us/our] eating in the classrooms

Does the verb 'allow" allow such structures as The teachers do not allow us eating in the classrooms. The teachers do not allow our eating in the classrooms.
sanya6's user avatar
  • 27
3 votes
1 answer
303 views

"What are their values?" what is the subject in sentences like this?

A few hours ago, a kid asked me the subject of a sentence, which was "Linda makes black forest cake", and I answered 'Linda' by explaining 'Who makes the cake' 'the doer' of that action (...
hwkal's user avatar
  • 650
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

What do I have to use "I had to" or "I have to"?

What is the difference between the following 2 sentences. The first: To solve the problem I have to create a new file. The second: To solve the problem I had to create a new file. The context where ...
User051209's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

to dispose (oneself) in a heavily negligent manner

While looking up the word "flop" in the American Heritage Dictionary I stumbled on this definition: "flop": to dispose (oneself) in a heavily negligent manner: to flop oneself in a ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
117 views

Can you use the verb pour with solid substances, like "pour flour"?

Can I use verb POUR in a sentence for solid substance eg: flour, sugar and salt etc?
Taqi's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

Clarification on the Use of Dual Verbs in Relative Clauses

I recently encountered a sentence structure that has piqued my curiosity, and I'm hoping to get some insights from the community here. The structure involves the use of two verbs in a relative ...
kokomi's user avatar
  • 147
0 votes
1 answer
37 views

One soon gave out his last breath [closed]

This context comes from the book "The Wager" by David Grann. It's the beginning of the book in which a group of emanciated survivors found onboard a small drifting boat is described: "...
Static Bounce's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Use of have/had in this sentence

Given these two sentences, talking about a show/concert that has been just experienced: I didn't enjoy it as much as I had hope to. I didn't enjoy it as much as I have hope to. My hunch tells me ...
spengler's user avatar

1
2 3 4 5
58