Questions tagged [verbs]

A verb is a word used to describe an action, state, or occurrence.

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4
votes
1answer
225 views

Should I use “force” or “squeeze” in the following sentence?

I want to write the following sentence; it sounds a bit strange to me, but I couldn't find a better way to write it. Moreover, having more then one (something) force/squeeze us to take into account ...
5
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2answers
3k views

Use of “shan't” in speech

Let's assume that someone says, "I shall do this" to me. As a response or a teasing way, Can I use, "You shan't..!" ? Well, I used this once - when a friend of mine replied: "Huh?" Is it OK to use "...
4
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2answers
2k views

What is the verb that describes a chicken opening its wings slightly to balance itself?

The context I want to use it in is as follows: Even within that confined space the chickens bustled around. Bobbing their heads in every direction, they balanced themselves by lifting their ...
5
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2answers
7k views

What is the difference between 'been home' and 'gone home'?

Is there any difference between the following sentences? He has not been home for a week. He has not gone home for a week. Which sentence would best emphasize the fact that the subject has ...
5
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4answers
3k views

Is “Births” correct as third person singular of “To birth”?

I have this doubt now that I'm writing down a translation of a text: the word "birth" can be either a noun or a verb, but its usage in different sentences is not completely clear to me. For example, ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Verb + Preposition (how to learn)

I have been learning English recently, but I have problems with learning English verbs and prepositions. I know how some verbs work. I let you do it I allow you to do it I said to you a week ago I ...
7
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4answers
3k views

“To correct” or “to correcting”?

Please tell me whether this sentence is correct. The first step to correcting a mistake is patience. I think that after to the verb must be in its infinitive form. Am I mistaken?
6
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1answer
3k views

Using 'supplement' as a verb

Recently I had to write an application letter, and when my teacher examined it; he marked the following sentence as incorrect (because of the supposedly wrong usage of 'supplement') I would like to ...
5
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2answers
2k views

“Relating” Vs “Related” in the following sentence?

While studying an online article, I came to a sentence: The media firm had uploaded some videos on the internet relating to these banks as well as Prudential Life Insurance and Life Insurance. ...
3
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1answer
818 views

“Increasing/growing/enhancing the response time” — with the meaning of “making bigger”

I would like to say that some actions I take will make the "response time" bigger. In other words, the delay will be bigger. Some options came to my head, but I don't know which one I should use. ...
5
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1answer
337 views

“Has” or “have” in this sentence?

Mr. Raj is one of the famous teachers who has/have come to teach you now. I'm confused between the two. I think have should come. But here noun is singular so has could also come.
4
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2answers
141 views

correct usage of verb

Am I correctly using the verb in both cases? There might be situations where the above strategies become invalid due to inconsistency of parameters or data issues. Inconsistency of ...
6
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3answers
1k views

Difference between “Let someone taste” and “Have someone taste”

I tried a new recipe for coming guests. After cooking I let my sister taste it. Can I also say, "I had my sister taste it"? I don't know the difference of these two sentences in terms of meaning. Is ...
3
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1answer
298 views

How does a preposition interfere with the intransitive/transitive usage of the verb “beckon”?

She indicated or beckoned for him to retrace his steps and come in. I came across the above piece probably written on an online English newspaper, but I'm not sure. Is for correct after beckoned? ...
7
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5answers
16k views

Which is the appropriate word here : 'wish' or 'want'?

I read the two sentences below and I am confused as to which one is more appropriate. I wish you to be mine. I want you to be mine. The word wish refers to desire and the word want refers to need. ...
6
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1answer
91 views

Is “be” always stative?

Can I use the verb be in present perfect continuous tense or it is always stative? Are there any exceptions?
6
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1answer
7k views

“worth to be verb-ed” vs. “worth verb-ing” [closed]

I read somewhere that Kynesian theory was contradicted, and therefore worth to be abandoned, ... —Dorigo G., in a comment on Paul Krugman's blog My grammar book says that this sentence is ...
2
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1answer
2k views

“ … a place where they can go … ” vs. “ … a place where to go … ”

Language changes, as everything does. Doubly important, then, that these members have their club. “This is a full-time job for me, but I don’t mind,” Mr. Allen said. “I see these people get ...
3
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0answers
702 views

Usage of verb in past tense [closed]

Being a non native speaker of English I was shocked when one of my friends used this sentence: Did you called me yesterday? According to my understanding it should be: Did you call me yesterday?...
2
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1answer
137 views

“Slip up” usage

December home sales slip; up 12.8% in 2012 December home sales slip up 12.8% in 2012 December home sales slip up; up 12.8% in 2012 December home sales slip up up 12.8% in 2012 1 is the original ...
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1answer
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Are archaic third person singular forms of verbs useful to English learners?

I just noticed a song of P.J.Harvey: "The Words That Maketh Murder". "Maketh" seemed very interesting; so I've searched for it, and found this Wikipedia entry. Maketh: (archaic) Third-person ...
6
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1answer
4k views

Is the word “think” stative or dynamic?

When can I use present continuous for think?
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2answers
3k views

Verbs describing a state or situation: passive form

"English Grammar Today" book says that "We don't usually use the passive with some verbs that describe a state or situation." If this is an actual rule, why, for example, have I found a lot of ...
7
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1answer
2k views

Infinitive and Gerund Construction

English isn't my mother tongue. I'm familiar with the notions of infinitive and gerund but I sometimes just don't know which of the two should be used in combination with which verb. Thomson and ...
8
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4answers
299 views

Phrasing a question

How ungrammatical/colloquial is to structure questions without the usage of an auxiliary verb? Is it possible to communicate well using only the second type? What impression does this make on an ...
3
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1answer
147 views

Can adjuncts be put between a verb and its complement?

I think he knows more or less everything that goes on here, you know. (Harry Potter) I’ve heard, in English, adjuncts cannot be put between verbs and their complements. For instance: *I think he ...
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2answers
3k views

Usage of “make” and “become”

Is it always valid to use make as a verb which causes a change by force in the personality/emotions/behaviors of objects? Is it always valid to use become before all human emotions/senses/adjectives ...
4
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1answer
573 views

Gerund & participle: “She stormed out, 'slamming' the door so hard that the mirror fell off the wall”

She stormed out, slamming the door so hard that the mirror fell off the wall. As fa as I know, in Italian language slamming functions as a gerund there, but, very often—as it could be the case ...
5
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2answers
115 views

Usage of 'split'

In a book, I encountered this sentence: Kosovo was a province of Yugoslavia before its split. This sentence portrays split as a noun/action. Now, I usually encounter split as: Kosovo was a ...
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1answer
10k views

Why say “Wait your turn” but “Wait FOR…” everything else?

Why in English is the word "for" not used in the phrase "wait your turn?" Wouldn't it make more sense to say "Wait for your turn" as for other things on which one waits? Wait for the stop light not ...

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