Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions about a body of words. It should not be used to inquire about the definition of a specific word.

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22 views

Are these rules, principles or something else?

There are some consideration different to typical grammar rules, such as Positive statements are often preferred, putting negative as early as possible, less is more (concise), etc. Is there a term to ...
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48 views

"turning point" in a physical road

I guess it's not clear to use "turning point" to refer to the area pointed out by the red circle in the image below, because "turning point" means "the time at which a ...
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2answers
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A person with mental disability

In the USA and the UK, What is the acceptable word for a person who is mentally abnormal? For instance, I've read that 'lunatic' is now considered to be offensive. Which of the following is acceptable ...
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130 views

what can I use instead of "less well defined"?

I have 2 models. Model-2 is more ambiguous than Model-1. I want to say Model-2 is less well defined, but it sounds strange already. What can I use instead of less well-defined?
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449 views

"occurrences" vs "recurrences"

Say a user selects an event in a calendar which is scheduled weekly. I want to give him the option to edit or delete the event only at the selected date, or edit all the events scheduled weekly. What ...
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218 views

"answer sheet" vs. "test paper"

In post meaning of "practice test notice", I called this thing "answer sheet", then I realized it might be test paper rather than "answer sheet". In contrast, the ...
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Learning vocabulary is a journey wihout destination, but exist ways to accelerate?

Is a hassle to learn vocabulary, I'm not saying is the devil and needs to be avoided, it's worth-while but I have been learning for the past year and I feel it consume a lot of my time and energy that ...
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20 views

word/phrase/term to refer to a teaching approach

Some teachers intentionally slow down their speech to let students hear them clearly, in the meanwhile, they keep the contraction to let students learn the pronunciation point. For example, when ...
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1answer
500 views

Grave danger or great danger [closed]

You're in grave danger. You're in great danger. Is 'great danger' correct? If then, what's the difference between 'grave danger' and 'great danger'?
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a word/phrase to refer to the behavior of hurting innocent people

Sarah tends to yelled at people who won't hurt her. Her boss criticized her in the morning for her failure on a contract and she felt upset. When she came home, she yelled at her husband to get some ...
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1answer
62 views

Drugs USE or drugs USED

I have a question that we use "Book rent" or "money spent" as nouns. So I think that noun (2)= noun (1) + past participle form of verb. For example, money spent (noun 2) = money (...
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Which one is correct, semester or semesters?

This information is for 4th and 5th semester? or This information is for 4th and 5th semesters?
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25 views

a word/phrase to refer to say bye

An English class just started, classmates say something like this How are you? I'm good. How about you? The sentences are called greetings. Suppose the class is closed/finished in a few minutes, ...
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129 views

Is there a word describing the feeling when cold water is drank, similar to "spiciness"?

Weird question, but you see how spicy food can be described by the word “spiciness”? How can one describe the feeling when cold water is drank? Do you know any adjective which describes this best?
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349 views

a kind of question where there is more than one option is correct

When I search "multiple choice questions", I get something like this where there is actually only one option is correct. What words could be referred to another type of question where there ...
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1answer
98 views

Why can't we write "common place"?

Is "common place" a not valid saying in English? As an example: can't we say like "We will meet in a common place"? Spell checkers always suggest to replace it with commonplace ...
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synonyms for "dislike"

Suppose someone else was trying to fool me and I found it. So I said "shame on you" to him. What he did makes me dislike/hate him. So, I would say I disrespect him as he was trying to fool ...
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2answers
43 views

get-out-of-jail-free card for being late

In a company, if an employee is being late, their wages for that month will be docked (one-time decrease). There is a thing called "late-coupon", some kind of get-out-of-jail-free card that ...
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1answer
208 views

"seen before" vs "already seen"

Please clarify the exact difference between: I've seen your hands before and I've already seen your hands Which sounds more natural in everyday English and which sound more common in formal talking or ...
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17 views

Can I use the word "debt" to talk about some tasks that I didn't do in due time?

Can the word "debt" relate to something not connected to money? More precisely, can I use it to talk about some tasks that I didn't do in due time? Example: I had to turn in math homework ...
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27 views

Questions on USE OF ENGLISH IN FCE exam

sorry for the stupid question, but I am preparing the student for FCE and we have such sentence: As a result ...it..... is common for old people to fall asleep during the day. Can we use here "...
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general questions version of "no such thing as"

The phrase "no such thing as" can be used to emphasize that something does not exist or is not possible. In contrast, the expression "very much so" is an emphatic way of answering '...
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3answers
71 views

Antonyms of "no such thing as"

From the Cambridge Dictionary there's no such thing/person (as): used to say that something or someone does not exist I've told you before, sweetie, there's no such thing as ghosts! I understand ...
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2answers
68 views

Is the story about Archimedes a myth?

From the Cambridge Dictionary myth: an ancient story or set of stories, especially explaining the early history of a group of people or about natural events and facts With the definition, a myth ...
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Is the most popular sport = the most prominent sport?

I'm preparing for the IELTS. So, I'm trying to use high-level vocabulary as much as possible. Consider the following sentences. In Japan, the most popular sport is baseball. In Japan, the most ...
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26 views

self-admiration or self-appreciation

If X believes that whatever abilities he has he gained all on his own. X merely ignores the factor that many of the abilities are by birth too and you have your abilities given to you by God. X thinks ...
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2answers
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What "bad loser" means in this context?

Here is an example given in the Cambridge dictionary for bad: She's just a bad loser (= she is unpleasant when she loses). Why does bad go back to "she" instead of "loser"? I would translate this ...
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224 views

What would you call this large bowl-shaped container? [duplicate]

What do you call this thing (on the picture)? Laundry and water is put in it.
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Could I call "give me a place to stand on, and I will move the Earth" a saying, an aphorism, an apothegm and an adage?

From the Cambridge Dictionary saying: a well-known wise statement that often has a meaning that is different from the simple meanings of the words it contains adage: a wise saying ...
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Truth or Reality: what fits best?

I read an article title 'Truth about denial of gravity'. The title seems to be giving an impression that the writer would support the denial but indeed he was against the denial. He believed in the ...
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1answer
68 views

When to use gigantic,large ,humongous and huge [closed]

When should I use gigantic, large ,humongous and huge
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48 views

Is it strange to call food the means to achieve a purpose?

I guess the following is grammatically correct. Patricia is a chef. She is preparing the food for tomorrow's party. The preposition "for" indicates the reason of her preparing, which is the party. ...
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50 views

To achieve the goal, he is willing to use anything, even friendship

Suppose a city is building 5G infrastructure, something like base station. There are three manufacturers selling those devices. The mayor of the city has not decided to choose which manufacturer. ...
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What is the exact meaning of the word additional?

I would like to ask one question regarding the meaning of the word additional. Does the word additional carry on the connotation of optional? Like for example if I write "additional settings" in a ...
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Emotion vs Feeling

According to Oxford dictionary, feeling is something you feel through the mind or through the human senses. While emotion is ​a strong feeling such as love, fear or anger; the part of a person’s ...
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4answers
462 views

Whichever or which?

There is something that has been bothering me: the nuance between "Whichever and Which" For instance: Choose which/ever time that suits you best to talk to me Take which/ever of these ...
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2answers
226 views

Is there a word for large group of horses? [closed]

Is there a word for large group of horses? I know there's "flock" for birds, but I am wondering if there's a similar word for horses and land mammals.
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What does 'opening storyline' mean in this sentence?

Today I was studying my physics textbook and this sentence shows up "....filling the tank of your car in the opening storyline with gasoline." I can't seem to understand what it means. Google says ...
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26 views

meaning: Mr. Just About

Does "Mr. Just About" make sense as a nickname for someone who does not care about precision? I'd appreciate your help.
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48 views

Is "public image" a common phrase to refer to something like public "ego"?

From the Merriam-Webster dictionary Definition of public image = the opinion that many people have of a person The scandal ruined his public image. I guess I understand the meaning and the ...
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1answer
40 views

a term to refer to "take away part of their salary"

In my company, employees should work from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm, 5 days a week. My company buys employees insurance, provides stock options to employees and pay wage monthly and had never been delayed. ...
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66 views

"Unbelief" or "disbelief"

If someone believes in God but rejects His words or orders or speaks some blasphemous words, is it called "unbelief" or "disbelief"?
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Is it common to use "work environment" and "work circumstance" to refer to relationship?

When I say something "My colleagues and I have a harmonious relationship. We are willing to help each other all the time", I am describing my "work environment", "work circumstance" or something else?
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What's the difference between 'restriction on' and 'restriction of'?

I have seen both forms in usage and couldn't work out the rule behind which preposition should be used in which context.
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21 views

Is there any difference between the terms 'define' and 'qualify'?

I have looked up their etymologies but cannot come to a nuanced demarcation between the terms. I know both generally imply limiting of a concept; in the case of 'qualify', extending to general ...
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1answer
411 views

Is "oftimes" a real word?

I have to do an translation of the text. There is a sentence: "In doing so they draw on any, and oftimes all, available sourses". It seems like "oftimes" is an abbreviation for "oftentimes" but I'‎m ...
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should we use a dash "-" between words of an adjective when omit a noun?

I know the question may seem too vague and weird, so let's go right to the example for more clarification: Scholars ask the-upper-class countries to help the-lower-class in the breakout of the ...
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1answer
103 views

Is it idiomatic to say "There are some chips on the wall"?

chip (n) 4 MARK a small hole or mark on a plate, cup etc where a piece has broken off chip in There’s a chip in this bowl. The edge of a wall is very prone to get broken since hard objects ...
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1answer
80 views

What is the difference between "pronounced" and "noticeable"

I have encountered "pronounced" a couple of times, but still wondering what it means exactly. I checked these dictionaries for this word: Longman, Cambridge, and Oxford, but in none of them, they ...
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Is it proper to say "don't let the error messages clobber up the results"?

I think I heard expressions such as "so many error messages... clobbering up the results", meaning we might expect to see some results on a computer terminal (such as in a command prompt), but the ...

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