Skip to main content

Questions tagged [word-choice]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

Can 'output' be used in the context of carbon emissions per person?

A freelancer I work with told me that I can replace emissions with output. Is it correct to use output when talking about carbon emissions per person? It sounds unnatural to me because how can a ...
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Can "show" be replaced by "present"?

The charts use the verb show. Is it good to use present instead? The charts present the average percentages in typical meals of three types of nutrients.
newbie forever's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
36 views

Knowing myself x Knowing me

In the sentence below, can either of the expressions "knowing myself" and "knowing me" be used? Knowing myself the way I do, I know I would never last in a job like that for a long ...
Itamar's user avatar
  • 1,243
0 votes
3 answers
65 views

Is "metro" used in British English?

This is an IELTS essay question I saw on a website. IELTS is a British test. Is the use of metros strange? Don't the British use 'underground railways'? Some cities have vehicle-free days when ...
newbie forever's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

When vs while vs as

I was cooking while she screamed Example number 1 shows that these two actions were happening at the same time. To make it more clear we could write (I was cooking while she was screaming). I was ...
Gregor's user avatar
  • 77
7 votes
2 answers
1k views

Are these labels or stickers?

I am inclined to call these labels as they are stuck onto something, e.g. an exercise book, a small medicine bottle or box and then you can write the child's name or the dosage on the label.
S635's user avatar
  • 233
1 vote
3 answers
38 views

Which verb is used for the voluntary termination of degree-awarding powers?

Which verb is used in BrE to express that a university voluntarily terminates its degree-awarding powers as a result of discontinuing the field of study to which the degree-awarding powers apply? I ...
Helen's user avatar
  • 1,796
2 votes
3 answers
232 views

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

I am not a native English speaker so I rely mostly on dictionaries. Normally, dictionaries have examples using structures of "get something/ somebody wet" or "get something/ somebody ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
1 vote
3 answers
73 views

How to say when I have a stomach-related long-term problem?

In my language, if you feel pain in your stomach but it automatically goes away after a while, it's a stomach ache. Maybe you ate something bad and it's not a serious problem. However, if the pain ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Can we call "an afternoon we hang out with our friends at a shopping mall" "an outing"?

According to some dictionaries, "outing" is "a short trip made by a group of people for entertainment/pleasure". But the definition of "an outing" on Merriam-Webster is a ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
0 votes
2 answers
31 views

Online stores don't have to pay for hefty "rental fees associated with the premises" - Alternatives for the words in quotes

Online stores don't have to pay for hefty rental fees associated with the premises. I'd like to use a noun phrase here, but I think the one I'm using in the sentence above is a bit too long. I'm ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
0 votes
2 answers
39 views

What word should I use when I want to refer to the different roads that are drawn from one city to other cities and connect them?

I am writing an article about ways to connect an ancient city with cities of the same time. But because these roads were paved or made of dirt, maybe a special word should be used for it.Which of ...
nahid mansoori's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
70 views

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

This is my daughter's math question. The way she did it is to count every cell one by one, which is not effective. So I told her "the first line is 10 and the second is 10 so we have 20 and we ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
-4 votes
2 answers
62 views

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

My son is throwing rocks into a pond with dirty black water and if the rock is pretty big it might splash the water all over the place and the water might get his clothes dirty. Can I say to him &...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
10 votes
13 answers
4k views

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

"Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times." Is there an precise adjective/phrase that means putting a lot of peer pressure on me that I can fill in the ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
-2 votes
2 answers
58 views

Is it correct to say "arrange the cup side by side in a row"? [closed]

According to my study, to arrange cups in a row means the face of each facing forward like this But this way of arrangement takes up too much space, so people arrange them like this But to describe ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
2 answers
43 views

Are "lay the newspaper on the floor" and "spread the newspaper on the floor" interchangeable?

Normally "lay" means "to put somebody/something in a particular position" (meaning 1) but it also means "to spread something on something" (meaning 2). So, "lay the ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
2 answers
60 views

"Social men" who have entered the real world and experienced lots of social challenges and complexities?

In Chinese, we can distinguish students, or even teachers, in the ivory tower from those who have entered the real world, infused with challenges, unspoken rules or norms, and complexities, using the ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,539
-1 votes
0 answers
38 views

Is it natural to say "no more conditions" when one gives you a condition when you ask him to do something?

My daughter often gives a reason for not learning math, for example, "I'm tired" or "I have to play" etc. Then, I often say "no more excuses". But sometimes she gives me ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
1 answer
39 views

A is in 1st grade and B is in 2nd grade. Is it offensive to say "A studies in lower grade/class"?

I asked Chatgpt this question and it says "A studies in lower grade/class" is offensive because "lower class or grade" shows derogatory. But "class" or "grade" ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
1 vote
1 answer
34 views

In a data report about online shopping, can I use "cybershopping" or "e-shopping" as alternatives?

In my experience, whenever I want to replace "online"; "e-", "cyber-" and "virtual" are my go-to options. In this specific case, I find these alternatives--...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
14 votes
9 answers
3k views

Do you have an expression saying "when you are very hungry, bread is also delicious for you" or similar one?

In Vietnam we often say "when you are very hungry, rice is also delicious to you". When you are full, food doesn't taste good to you. But when you are hungry, even the most boring food ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
-2 votes
0 answers
28 views

Leaf and gravy dripping means

Leaf and gravy dripping over the browned skin, which increased the appetite and made everybody's mouth water. The sentence suggests that leaf and gravy was dripping over the brown roast skin of meat. ...
Abid's user avatar
  • 415
0 votes
1 answer
30 views

I went to my second job

I have been wondering if in certain contexts it is possible to say that we "go to the job". Normally "job" is reserved for meanings closer to "position" and "post&...
Penguin422's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Are "leave the phone for me" and "leave the phone to me" the same?

I guess "leave the phone for me" and "leave the phone to me" are different. Look at examples from the dictionary Did she leave a package for me? We left a good tip for our ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
6 votes
2 answers
316 views

"be they good or bad" or "be these good or bad"

The news industry should continue reporting news-worthy stories, be these/they bad or good, to ensure its profitability. I'd thought I could use either in the above sentence, but after running a ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
37 views

Is it correct to say “Students will *flock to you* if you are a good teacher”?

What I want to say is “If you are a good teacher, a lot of students will register for your class and study under you”. As far as I’ve researched, “flock to somebody” means “come and visit somebody in ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

are "day by day" and "by the day" the same?

The dictionary says "His health is growing worse day by day. = His health is growing worse by the day. [=his health is growing worse every day]" However, Chat GPT says "day by day" ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
1 answer
20 views

When do you use "ponder" and when do you use "mull over"?

In the following sample sentences from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, it seems to me that the two words are interchangeable in all instances without even the smallest change of nuance / ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
47 views

What does "then" signify in the context of "my whole life" already being mentioned?

In Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023), Mantis speaks to Guardians of the Galaxy: Mantis: I love you all. I do. But my "whole life" I did whatever Ego wanted, and then, I did whatever the ...
Cameron Melvin's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
22 views

Is the word "around" needed?

This is the line from "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)": Adam: I am the Warlock, Mum, and I am done with being ordered around. Is the word "around" needed?
Cameron Melvin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
25 views

How does "On the ground!" really fits here?

With weapons in her hand, Nebula speaks to Adam Warlock, who is trying to catch Rocket: Nebula: On the ground! According to the dictionary, "On the ground!" means "among the general ...
Cameron Melvin's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Is it natural to say "drink it up to this level"?

I want my son to drink warm water in the early morning so that he can easily empty his bowel before going to school because it's not nice if he has to do it at school. But, he doesn't like it very ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
2 answers
25 views

is this sentence too long "stand up the footstool so that it is on its side"?

If the footstool is on its side like this, we can not sit on it. So we say "lay the footstool flat" or "lay the footstool down flat" What about do it the other way round? Say a ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
7 votes
5 answers
2k views

Is it correct to say "a picture of teen Uncle James"?

When someone is a grown-up, how can we refer to photos which were they were taken when they were younger? I remember someone told me I can say "a photo of baby you/ baby him / baby Mary...". ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
2 answers
37 views

Do you say "stand at the beginning of the queue" the same way we say "stand at the end of the queue"?

In the dictionary, "end" is used for both time and space. For example, -They get married at the end of the movie. (time) -The bank is right at the end of the street. (space) Also in the ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
4 votes
2 answers
279 views

Assignee, appointee or something else entirely?

In my native language, we have a word for people performing some kind of assignment, including contractors, expert consultants, external reviewers, (student) representatives,board members and so on ...
Helen's user avatar
  • 1,796
3 votes
3 answers
451 views

Is “bonding event" the best term for an event at which people can bond with each other?

I'm struggling to come up with a word that means an event where we can bond with each other, not just for a team or a company division, but maybe for family members or people in the same community, ...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
8 votes
10 answers
4k views

Is there a word that means both "house" and "apartment"?

In my language, there's a word that can be used to call both "house" and "apartment", and even "home". I searched and found the word "dwelling" which means &...
Phoebe's user avatar
  • 1,135
3 votes
1 answer
310 views

Do we say "skip doing something" such as "skip cooking breakfast"?

Most dictionaries just say "skip + Noun", for example, "skip school/class/the meeting/ breakfast...". I don't understand why they don't have the structure "skip doing ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
1 answer
65 views

What does a history teacher at school ask a student to prepare by the next lesson? A report, a paper, a presentation or what?

For example, on the topic of "ancient Egyptian culture", "the life of Alexander the Great", "reasons of the Second World War" or something else. That is, the student ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

Do I need an article? [closed]

In a sentence: "... in the play "Wooden House"." Do I need to place "the" before "Wooden House"(Play name). I feel like I don't because "play" has it ...
Gleb's user avatar
  • 131
2 votes
1 answer
29 views

Congratulations on/for your successful performance?

In the sentence: "Congratulations on/for your successful performance..." What is the correct option "on" or "for"?
Gleb's user avatar
  • 131
6 votes
1 answer
684 views

The UK's population or The UK population

I always thought that the correct structure to talk about the population of a country is "Country + 's + population", for example, the UK's population and France's population. However, ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
6 votes
5 answers
3k views

Is there any object we own but don't possess?

I'm trying to tell the difference between possess and own. According to the Cambridge and Oxford dictionaries, possess is more formal than own and means to have or own something. To my mind, although ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

difference between "personally know anyone" and "know anyone"

(1) I don't personally know anyone who works at an employment agency. (2) I don't know anyone who works at an employment agency. My non-native friends think "know anyone" doesn't make any ...
ansonman's user avatar
  • 632
0 votes
1 answer
14 views

word choice: [given to us] or [given to our efforts]

I have written down the sentences below. (1) Thank you very much for all the help and support you have given to our efforts. (I made it up.) (2) Thank you very much for all the help and support you ...
ansonman's user avatar
  • 632
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Come vs go - a specific case which hasn't been covered

I've read some posts differentiating come and go on the site, however, there's a case which hasn't received that much attention, which is when the speaker and the listener are both at the same place, ...
An IELTS Learner's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
29 views

Is "think on your feet" used with positive or negative meanings?

I checked 2 chatbots and one says "think on your feet" is used in positive sentences and the other says it is used in negative ones. The dictionary just says "think on your feet: to ...
Tom's user avatar
  • 24.3k
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

The difference between sound and voice

I am confused about the noun meaning between "sound" and "voice because I want to express the meaning "i like your sound/your voice/the sound of your voice." I search the ...
lou xiu's user avatar
  • 43

1
2 3 4 5
151