Questions tagged [word-choice]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

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1answer
16 views

Do we say “put your hair roller on your hair / head / bangs”?

Look at this picture Do we say "put your hair roller on your hair / head / bangs"? But I didn't feel that a hair roller can be used in the same way as a hat or a hairband. We can say "put your ...
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1answer
14 views

Is it 'freshman female representative' or 'freshwoman representative'?

Lexico has the word 'freshwoman', but, unlike 'freshman', it doesn't have the meaning 'a newcomer or novice, especially someone newly elected to Congress'. Which option would be better? 'Freshman ...
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1answer
10 views

Looking for a verb that describes stopping the light of the candle

If I have a candle which is lightning and I want to stop it by my touching the wick and stop it mechanically by my fingers at the moment because I want to sleep. Do I want to extinguish it, or to put ...
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1answer
25 views

Confused! The differences between “coconut juice”, “coconut water”, “coconut milk”, “coconut cream”?

juice [uncountable, countable] the liquid that comes from fruit or vegetables; a drink made from this a glass of fruit juice a carton of apple juice lemon/lime juice Add the ...
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1answer
16 views

What phrase or verb do you use to say that someone accidentally has left a pen or marker mark on their face?

What phrase or verb do you use to say that someone accidentally has left a pen or marker mark on their face? Which one of the following communiate the idea the best? You marked your face with the ...
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1answer
24 views

How would you word the sentence “if you cancel in the three days before the tour date, all application fee is on your charge”?

How would you word the sentence "if you cancel in the three days before the tour date, all application fee is on your charge"? I want to say that if you do not cancel the tour date 4 days before the ...
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1answer
36 views

What do you call the place where car tires are changed, oil is checked and if there is something wrong with your car, it is fixed?

What do you call the place where car tires are changed, oil is checked and if there is something wrong with your car, it is fixed there? I would like to know what people call that plece in American ...
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1answer
35 views

Concerned or worried?

Could someone please tell me which one of "concerned" and "worried" that has the strongest meaning? He was concerned/worried.
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1answer
23 views

“There is not + noun” vs “There is no + noun”

I am wondering why in sentences with "There is/are" "not" sounds so unnatural, for example: There are not shops in this village. I assume that the one correct version is "There are no ...
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1answer
36 views

Is “deterred” appropriate here?

Can I use "deterred" in this context? Tori ran over to her grandfather, not deterred by the big beard he'd grown since she last saw him.
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23 views

The use of the word “startle” in context

Let's say I am creeping up on my friend who is in his chair leaning far back. And then what I do is I tilt his chair way back to make him believe that he is going to fall over just to scare him. Is it ...
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1answer
48 views

Is my nationality Dutch or Netherlands?

I'm from the Netherlands. English has taught me to say "I'm Dutch". But through many travels I've noticed that non-native English speakers confuse this with "Deutsch", which is German for, well, ...
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23 views

Is 'leashfully' an English word?

Here is an activity question from an English textbook intended for primary class students. In this question the word 'leashfully' is seemed to fill the dash marked 'f'. But is 'leashfully' a correct ...
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1answer
33 views

Meaning of the verb “swing”, Can we swing while our feet are in contact with a surface?

swing 1 MOVE FROM A FIXED POINT [intransitive, transitive] to make regular movements forwards and backwards or from one side to another while hanging from a particular point, or to make something ...
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1answer
41 views

Has everybody gotten their homework back?

I am a TA (teacher assistant) at a university and want to make sure I have distributed all the graded homework to my students so I said Has everybody gotten their homework back? Is this a right ...
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22 views

Is it idiomatic to say “you're eating like you're starving”?

be starving (also be starved American English) to be very hungry You must be starving! When a person eat quickly and take large mouthfuls of food because he is starving. What is the idiomatic ...
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3answers
39 views

Difference between “deliver” and “send”

In the (7) blank the answer is " Deliver " but can we use " Send " instead?
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2answers
65 views

What is the opposite of “in the dark”?

the dark [singular] the lack of light in a place, especially because it is night Are the children afraid of the dark? in the dark All the lights went out and we were left in the dark. ...
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1answer
21 views

Should the following sentence use “not surprising” or “not surprisingly”?

He hadn't arrived yet. Not surprising/surprisingly. It was too early. I think it can go both ways? Maybe the sentence could mean: Not surprisingly, he hadn't arrived yet. Or: He hadn't ...
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1answer
23 views

Do we say “you need good manual dexterity” or “you need to be skillful”?

​dexterity (uncount): skill in using your hands or your mind You need good manual dexterity to be a dentist. mental/verbal dexterity skillful (adj): ​(of a person) good at doing something,...
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2answers
25 views

“Carefully” vs “Cautiously”

Teacher) She ignores what I ask her through the class and often talks to other students when I'm teaching and distracts me. I have warned her several times so far, but she always overlooks my ...
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17 views

“Comprehend” or “Understand”

Please have a look on the definition below: That is, both words mean "grasp the meaning of," but in some cases understand stresses the final result, while comprehend stresses the process of getting ...
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2answers
41 views

What is it called? a socket? an extension cord? or both?

socket: 1 a place in a wall where you can connect electrical equipment to the supply of electricity SYN power point British English, outlet American English exˈtension ˌlead British English, ...
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2answers
52 views

is it idiomatic to say “She is going to the deathday party”?

deathday (noun): the day of a person's death or its anniversary In some Asian countries, every year a family often holds a party for its members and guests to celebrate / memorize the deathday of one ...
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Do we say “to strap the hat behind the neck” or “to put the strap of the hat around the neck and fasten it”?

strap somebody/something + adv./prep. to fasten somebody/something in place using a strap or straps He strapped the knife to his leg. Everything had to be strapped down to stop it from ...
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12 views

'This' v. 'that' when referencing smth just mentioned

I don't know, suppose it's something like this (I made up the sentences myself): Dolphins have a smooth, streamlined body. This/that helps them accelerate up to 34.5 mph. Sometimes, even in ...
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23 views

Do you say “don't leave your sleeve pendulous, roll it up”?

pendulous (adj): hanging down loosely and moving from side to side The sleeve seems to be a bit too long, which makes you uncomfortable. Do you say "don't leave your sleeve pendulous, roll it up"? ...
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14 views

is it idiomatic to say “the plastic tube is broken”?

broken (adj) that has been damaged or injured; no longer whole or working correctly a broken window/plate a broken leg/arm/bone pieces of broken glass How did this dish get broken? ...
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0answers
25 views

Is it “you, who refuses” or “you, who refuse” or other?

I'm writing a piece in the second person and I've stumbled on a weird complexity of grammar that I can't wrap my head around. My original sentence in the first draft: "You, who refuse to even think ...
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1answer
17 views

Is electro-resuscitate a word? Can it be used?

I thought I would find the word in the dictionary. However, after doing a Google search I found out I was wrong. The term electro-resuscitation has been used though: ... Giovanni Aldini, Professor ...
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38 views

Would you say “to face the screen of the smartphone downwards” or “ to turn the smartphone upside down”?

right side up ​(North American English) with the top part turned to the top; in the correct, normal position I dropped my toast, but luckily it fell right side up. upside down: ​in or into a ...
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1answer
39 views

could we use the verb “poke” without an agent who caused it?

poke [intransitive, transitive] to quickly push your finger or some other pointed object into something or someone poke somebody/something with something Andy poked the fish with his finger ...
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21 views

Should the plural form of a word or phrase have an apostrophe?

I thought they should have an apostrophe. Since you add one with letters (e.g. There are two x's in this equation). So I thought you were supposed to write: They are many why's that don't have an ...
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1answer
34 views

How to use “right side up”, “upside down”, “sideways” correctly?

right side up ​(North American English) with the top part turned to the top; in the correct, normal position I dropped my toast, but luckily it fell right side up. upside down: ​in or into a ...
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1answer
28 views

Awareness on X vs. awareness of X

Example, should one say "awareness on depression" or awareness of depression"? I'm confused because I found both usages. Example: We'll also be hosting an event raising awareness on depression ...
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3answers
109 views

Reach manhood or reach to manhood?

1) When he reaches to manhood, he will visit England. OR 2) When he reaches manhood, he will visit England. Which of the two is correct?
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20 views

Using “for good.”

After the final blow, he was knocked out for good. Is for good used correctly in this sentence?
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4answers
56 views

What noun do you use for an occasion of below zero temperatures?

What noun do you use for a period of very cold weather in which temperature drops below zero? Can I use the word frost For example: There was a strong frost last night.
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1answer
40 views

what are the differences between the verb: “flick” and “flip”?

flick 1-[transitive] flick something + adv./prep. to hit something lightly with a sudden quick movement, especially using your finger and thumb together, or your hand She flicked the dust ...
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2answers
31 views

Should I say “My child coughed sputum / phlegm / mucus up” in general everyday English?

​sputum (uncount): liquid from the throat or lungs, especially when it is coughed up (= forced up from the lungs, etc) because of disease blood in the sputum ​phlegm (uncount): the thick ...
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0answers
27 views

Difference between social networks and social media?

What is the difference between "social networks" and "social media"? I often see these two terms used, and I can't figure out when to use one or the other. I also wanted to know if the natives could ...
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0answers
18 views

What is the difference between 'a few', 'some', 'several', and 'multiple'?

'A few', 'some', 'several', 'multiple' seem to have, more or less, the same meaning. But, as I see it, 'a few' appears to be less than 'some' and 'several' while 'some' and 'several', in turn, appear ...
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16 views

As if that wasn't bad enough vs. as if that weren't bad enough

I'm aware that should use was when talking about an event in the past. And you should use were if it's an hypothetical situation that hasn't happened. I'm not sure to which category "as if that wasn'...
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1answer
35 views

What adjective do you use to describe someone who doesn't let others use their things when they themselves don't need them the moment?

Let's say there is a person who has three phones, which they don't all need at the moment. And one of the person's coworkers asks them if they can use one of the person's phones because their phone ...
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0answers
13 views

How do you describe the sound a chair makes when someone is heavily rocking it on the floor?

How do you describe the sound a normal chair makes when someone is heavily rocking it on the floor? Can I use the verb thump. For example: Stop making that chair thump! For that matter, is it ...
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2answers
26 views

“Ministry of Education” capital or small initials?

If I want to mention Ministry of Health in the middle of a sentence should I capitalize initials or not. For example: Thanks to the German Ministry of Health Or, Thanks to the German ministry ...
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1answer
22 views

Free riders and freeloaders

I am wondering about the spelling of these two words. Why is "free rider" spelled as two words, while "freeloader" is only one? Is there a rule for this? Furthermore, where is the exact difference ...
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1answer
30 views

Is it natural to describe a common cold as long?

Is it natural to describe a common cold as long? For example: I had a long cold for a week, but thankfully it went away. Would it be more natural to use the adjective lengthy or prolonged for ...
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1answer
39 views

Is it better to say “This feature allows you to…” or “This feature lets you…”?

In the context of a web application, is it better to say: "This feature allows you to (do something/action)." or "This feature lets you (do something/action)."?
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2answers
21 views

Using “role model” as an adjective

Can role model be used as an adjective? For example, in a thank you letter: Thanks to my role model friends

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