Questions tagged [word-choice]

This tag is for questions which a dictionary cannot answer about the several possibilities available for a particular meaning, and which one of them would be the most appropriate.

401 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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1answer
35 views

What adjective does lay between “selfish” and “unselfish”?

Selfish means someone who doesn't care about others' needs. Unselfish means the one who is willing to put others' wishes before her own. These two adjectives are radically opposite. What adjective ...
2
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3answers
52 views

Is or Does ? - need help which one is the correct one

Which one is correct? Does your business partner taking advantage of you? or Is your business partner taking advantage of you? For me they seemed correct but I'm not familiar with the English rules ...
2
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1answer
90 views

“had to have known” vs “must know”

Coroner just told me that Christine's body was put in the water sometime early Tuesday morning. So that Monday night party is critical. Somebody there had to have known what happened later that ...
2
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1answer
28 views

higher {than on vs. than that on vs. than that of}

Which sentence seems more natural: Tax burden on domestic companies is 30 percent higher than on international companies. Tax burden on domestic companies is 30 percent higher than that on ...
2
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2answers
20 views

Put/Take ; In/Out: What is a verb useable for both?

"He was asked to put the blocks in and take the blocks out of the box." What is an alternative to "put/take" in this sentence, so that the sentence can read "He was asked to [verb] the blocks in and ...
2
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1answer
72 views

What is a single word such that it is not too deserted and it conveys the meaning of “desiredly”?

I am after a word that is not too unknown and that can convey the meaning of "desiredly? Here "desiredly" is only used to make a point; I did some search and am under the impression that there is no ...
2
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1answer
17 views

“leave many [N] to look for…” vs. “leave many [N] looking for…”

SAT Grammar Question Others, like court interpreter Ludmila Baker, believe that technology will ultimately leave many translators and interpreters _______ for new careers. a) to look b) ...
2
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3answers
130 views

Should “materials” and “processing agents” be plural or singular after “any” in this sentence?

The products do not come into contact with any materials or processing agents that contain gluten. VS. The products do not come into contact with any material or processing agent that ...
2
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1answer
13k views

Use “time-slots” in a sentence

My apologies, but I am not available for the whole week of June 26. Could you please give me some time-slots for the following week? My apologies, but I am not available for the whole week of June ...
2
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1answer
7k views

'immediately before', 'right before' and 'just before'

What is the difference (if any) between immediately before, right before and just before ? What is the most suitable one to use in this sentence: The paragraph ..... before the image.
2
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1answer
9k views

What is the difference between “I am sorry to miss your concert” & “I am sorry for missing your concert”?

Here is from the dictionary Sorry (adj): [not before noun] feeling sad and sympathetic sorry (that)… I'm sorry that your husband lost his job. sorry (to see, hear, etc.) We're sorry to ...
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1answer
97 views

Is this sentence anastrophe?

I came across the sentence Pretty soon along came some people. However I wonder if Some people came along pretty soon. is correct. Is this sentence anastrophe?
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1answer
2k views

He has been working on the problem for a long time but is still/yet not able to solve it

Sentence improvement: He has been working on the problem for a long time but is still not able to solve it. I believe this sentence is correct. But the answer to of this question is to place yet ...
2
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1answer
209 views

Verb for someone who refuses to repay money

What's the verb to say the behavior of someone who refuse to repay the money he owed? (Even if he knows it and is able to pay it back.) As far as I know, there is a commonly used noun which called ...
1
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1answer
25 views

Is “gradually” used correctly?

The shooting goes on for a while, then gradually stops. Howie peeks his head up/out from behind the couch and sees bodies all over the place. Questions. Is "gradually" used correctly? Is "up" and "...
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2answers
71 views

Can you say “Can anyone help me?”?

I think you can say anyone, my teacher says no and insists on anybody and my sister, an almost English major says it's someone. This was an exercise that you had to complete a sentence with an ...
1
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1answer
16 views

To reach my aims vs To achieve my aims

I'm doing an exercise from an ESL book where I need to choose the correct collocation. Here's the bit I'm confused about: Since I decided to become an architect, I've put a lot of effort into ...
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0answers
31 views

As if that wasn't bad enough vs. as if that weren't bad enough

I'm aware that should use was when talking about an event in the past. And you should use were if it's an hypothetical situation that hasn't happened. I'm not sure to which category "as if that wasn'...
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0answers
20 views

agreat vs. a great vs. greater

Here is a quotation from the movie Great Expectations Part 2 (1999; Director: Julian Jarrold) If the danger would be 50 times agreat I should still have come to you. The meaning is clearly "...
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0answers
52 views

Are these usages better off without the prepositions?

Is it better to not add the preposition when using any of the usages below in daily conversation and in writing? Why? Will the answers vary from person to person? spend time (on) doing something / ...
1
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1answer
28 views

Does this sentence sound redundant?

This mood is mainly created by the voice-over that consists of a sound clip, probably recorded in 1949, in which a man reads article 24 of the Geneva Convention in a very serious tone. Is this ...
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0answers
24 views

For some time or For a while

Which one is correct and what is the difference? Are they interchangeable? Should I use "for" with a while? I understand that some time means for a long period of time but I mean about a description ...
1
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1answer
33 views

“I wonder what his favorite word is” vs “I wonder what's his favorite word”

These both sound off to me. Ending a sentence with "is" just doesn't read well in my opinion, though neither does shoving it somewhere earlier in the sentence like in the second example. This is just ...
1
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1answer
43 views

I look forward to a resubmission or I look forward for your resubmission

Which is one correct of the above sentence? OR Can I say' I'm looking forward for your resubmission or I'm looking forward to your resubmission
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0answers
35 views

When should I say I apologize and when should I say I am sorry?

Is it related with the size of the wrong I did it or with the respect of the person or something else? I made some researches and I found that : An apology is a formal admission of a wrongdoing....
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1answer
35 views

Instinctively or intuitively?

Jacob is sleeping in bed. His phone, which is on silent mode, is ringing silently on the nightstand. He instinctively wakes up, sees it's ringing, and picks up. Hi, everyone. Is "instinctively" the ...
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1answer
46 views

“The culture that/in which we inhabit…”

The culture that we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. The culture in which we inhabit shapes how we think, feel, and act in the most pervasive ways. Is ...
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1answer
36 views

The output of an adapter

I'm trying to name a function in a software package. Let's start with some backgrounds. The package provides supplemental functions to multiple upstream packages that train random forests. To avoid ...
1
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1answer
29 views

…hoped that you would/could have been

X: "It's a big thing, so I was there with her." Y: "How did it go?" X: "Fine, though I think she had hoped that you would/could have been there too." Is the third piece of dialogue natural in the ...
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1answer
22 views

When I talk about a very short time, is it idiomatic and clear to use “time point” “time frame” to describe time? Is there a more appropriate term?

I post this in another discussion. think of "Right now" has a meaning of "time point" which "currently" don't have. "Turn around right now" means "Turn around" in a few seconds and "currently" does ...
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1answer
24 views

When talking about `apply for` certain operators, `apply to` is more appropriate, is my understanding right?

this doc says Some additional rules apply for certain operators (e.g., a string as a left argument to the ‘%’ operator). Extensions must define their own conversion behavior. per cambridge, when ...
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1answer
43 views

Concrete examples to supplement(s) when talk about some operation or explanation

I am confused with the usage of the word supplement. A similar usage might be a 16-page advertising supplement where it means an additional part of a book, newspaper, report etc Following is ...
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1answer
127 views

“In the end” or “At the end”

Which of these phrases is correct: "We are in the end." "We are at the end." I know that most of the time when using "at the end" there should be a noun. Like, "...at the end of something". But ...
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2answers
58 views

“Clumsy” or “Awkward”

Let's assume an inexperienced guy who doesn't know where to say what to a girl at the first meeting and says some irrelevant and out-of-place words which may even offend the girl. Or Let's ...
1
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1answer
64 views

when someone say “yesterday was raining, so I didn't go outside of house” is it “raining” or “rainy”?

I heard someone said "yesterday was raining, so I didn't go outside of house", which seems to be a misuse. per this post To describe what is actually happening right now, you use the verb form: ...
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1answer
7 views

A verb for when mistrust increases?

After what he did, her mistrust in their relationship _______ . So they already had mistrust in this agreement, but with the recent turns of events their mistrust ______ . If you do that, ...
1
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1answer
26 views

To watch the play without knowing the story

I would like to know if there is an idiom or a proverb in English to denote a situation in which one watches a play or a dramatic performance without knowing its story. It is similar to participating ...
1
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1answer
31 views

‘borrow’ or 'draw'

This is a sentence in my paper: By drawing/borrowing mathematical results from Fourier analysis, we have gained some insights into quantum dynamics. Which word fits better?
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1answer
32 views

How to attribute the adjectives “open/closed” and “undone/done” to a “zipper”, “zip”, “fly” or a “button” correctly?

It strikes me that almost always using all four adjectives "open/closed" and "undone/done" for all the words "button", "zipper", "fly" and "zip" can be used interchangeably and freely; but I need to ...
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1answer
42 views

Describing a Concept as “Delusional” or “Illusional” Here?

So I wonder if there is any chance for such a use of the term "delusional" to make sense (even for exaggeration): We will show that such-and-so concept can be delusional. If not, would "illusional" be ...
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2answers
142 views

Initial talking or initial talk?

I just saw "initial talking" as the title to the introduction on an academic text. I had only seen "talk" not "talking". Is initial talking also used as an introduction of sorts?
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1answer
67 views

Can “who” and a “noun” go together or should I use “which”?

"Who among the following singers is from China?" I would like to know in the aforementioned question, should the noun "singers" be included or should it be rephrased to "Which of the following ...
1
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1answer
47 views

What is called an organization where people are looking for a job for a while?

I am writing a CV in English and I have come to work experience. I do not know if there is a name in English for this organization or something like that, but in my language a literal translation ...
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1answer
53 views

before or until

The book was so interesting that he had read it for three hours __________ he realized it. A. before B. until Which one would you choose? Our teacher said the answer was "before". I can't ...
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1answer
256 views

which is vs being

When I was searching for information about ''which is vs being'', I found information about this topic. It said that using ''which is'' '' is not idiomatic to use in the following sentence; sentence ...
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2answers
144 views

Which of the following words will be suitable to name the bonus? recommendation, recommending and recommender

The following is the translation draft of a part of description about a bet game website. In this bet game website, a member can share a recommending link of a bet game (or a code added after the ...
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2answers
130 views

Which is a better alternative for “limitations” in this context: “lacked resources” or “lacked the capability”?

This is from a book review by Michell (1920): "[...] provinces tried to meet the need [of tackling unemployment] by [...], but the limitations of purely provincial and unrelated bureaus became ...
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1answer
36 views

Rephrasing 'dividing the tasks?'

What is the proper way to rephrase dividing the tasks? Does splitting the tasks more appropriate? The complete sentence is, Dividing the tasks would greatly help.
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1answer
2k views

What could be the names of the sound of the water falling in a shower?

one of my friends said: "The swoosh of the shower" I don't really think it fits the calm sound that could be heard when water is falling in a common shower, listening in the bedroom next door. What ...
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1answer
2k views

“I haven't seen you the whole year” vs “for the whole year”

What are the grammar rules for using all/the whole in reference to time? For example in the sentence, I haven't seen you the whole year I haven't seen you for the whole year My question is ...

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