Questions tagged [word-difference]

For questions about differences in meaning or use between related words or words with similar meanings

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0
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1answer
16 views

“Impudent”, “Insolent” or “Impertient”

Please have a look on the following example and let me know which choice sounds correct: — Yet it was still an encouraging victory for Mourinho’s team and a difficult afternoon for Tottenham Hot ...
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0answers
18 views

When someone's body or voice shakes/shivers/trembles

According to the Cambridge dictionary definitions: Shake: (transitive) As the most generic word among the three choices, it means "to move backwards and forwards or up and down in quick, short ...
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1answer
28 views

“Dread”, “Terror” and “Horror”

I wonder if you agree that "dread" and "terror" mean quite similar that we can almost always use them interchangeably! Actually, based on dictionary definitions, they both mean, **a stronger version" ...
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1answer
21 views

“Required”, “Needed” and “Requisite”

I wonder what's the difference between the synonymous words: required, needed and requisite To me they all mean so similar that I have always used then interchangeably, but I needed to know how you ...
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1answer
30 views

What does “having budgets” in this context mean?

To overcome this problem, I believe primary education should teach children about the importance of being within \ having budget(s). A native English speaker suggests to write "having budgets" ...
2
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1answer
44 views

“Be + to infinitive” VS “Be + root verb”

Your task [ is to / is ] remove all the dirt. All I want to do [ is to / is ] thank you. Between "is to" and just "is", what is more common, and what's the difference in their meaning or usage.
2
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1answer
42 views

“Require” or “Need”

I thought that the two verbs "require" and "need" mean the same thing, while I saw these links: link 1 and link 2. Now, I don't think these two verbs are always the same. (Though I have my doubts ...
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1answer
33 views

“Interdependant” vs “Correlative”

I wonder what do you call two things that are related to one another in such a close way that each one "needs" the others in order to exist and none of them can last without the other one? I know just ...
-1
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1answer
22 views

“Continuously” or “Continually”

Let's assume that nurses have transferred a patient after surgery to the recovery room a couple of hours ago. The patient has come to already and during this period of time has kept moaning. His/her ...
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1answer
17 views

'Are never' or 'Will never'

Browse our dictionary apps today and ensure you are never again lost for words. As a new learner of English,I didn't understand it well. Instead to use "You are never again' in the above sentence,...
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1answer
22 views

“Content”, “Satisfied”, “Pleased” or “Happy”

I have alredy read the similar thread, but unfortunately it didn't include useful information to me! In my eyes, the nuance between these synonymous words is as below: Between content and satisfied/...
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1answer
15 views

Expose vs exposè [closed]

What is the difference between the terms: expose and exposè Is the latter is just French version of the former or its meaning is also varied?
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2answers
33 views

Annoy, Irritate or Bother?

"Annoy:" means: To make someone slightly angry or upset: I know you’re doing this only to annoy me. "Irritate:" means: to make someone angry or annoyed: After a while her behaviour ...
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1answer
27 views

very vs fairly vs pretty vs somehow vs quite vs extremely vs really vs enough

I would like to know the difference between the following intensifiers: very, fairly, pretty, somewhat, quite, extremely, really, enough. I would like to know their difference based on how strong or ...
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1answer
28 views

<Brag about> vs <Boast about>

According to the dictionary definition the two words "boast about someone / something" and brag about someone / something" are so close in meaning that I cannot differentiate between them. Are they ...
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2answers
28 views

<Grudge>, <rancor> and <Ill will>

What do you call a long-lasting quite negative emotions towards someone because of their actions which has been remained since the past? I wonder which choice is more appropriate in this sense? As a ...
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1answer
37 views

Why is “modest” weaker than “moderate”

A quick reading of Fed language alongside contemporaneous‎ economic data shows that "modest" is a touch weaker than "moderate," with a threshold a bit below 2% gross domestic product growth, ...
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1answer
36 views

<Disobedient>, <Defiant>, <Rebellious> or <Insubordinate> child/youngster

I wonder what do you call a child or a youngster who disobeys against their parents orders, sometimes even the conventional and social rules and regulations, and someone who often talks back to their ...
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1answer
27 views

“haven’t” or “didn't” which one is more appropriate to ask (reminder) someone to do something?

this question comes from this post. that post gives some equations and discussion based on those equations. someone is asking for tag(s) about those equations. You haven’t numbered your equations....
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2answers
46 views

“Command” Vs “Order”

How would you define the difference between the words "command" and "order" in general? I used to interpret them as: "Order" - "заказывать в ресторане = order in a restaurant" (in Russian) and "...
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1answer
44 views

To obey someone [closed]

As you can see in any dictionary definition, you can obey only laws, rules, regulations and so on, but I can't find a single dictionary has mentioned that you can "obey someone"! Sometimes, I see ...
1
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1answer
32 views

I won't/don't accept any excuse(s)

I wonder which choice below is the most correct one? Please let me know why the other choice do not work: Person A) Sorry I'm late. The traffic on the way in was crazy! Person B) This is your ...
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2answers
41 views

“Won't” or “Don't”

I wonder which choice would sound more idiomatic in my scenario below and why: A) Why...................you dance in front of us? Are you too shy? B) Yes, I am shy about performing in front of ...
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1answer
23 views

A comparison between <shy>, <embarrassed> and <ashamed>

Dictionaries' definitions don't seem to be quite distinguishing that I can choose between these three words and use them properly. I wonder if you could have a look on my scenario and let me know ...
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1answer
28 views

“Going red” or “Blush”

Please have a look on the scenario below: We both loved each other. When we met each other for the second time, we both conveyed some messages through our looks and the way we stared at each other, ...
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0answers
26 views

Look at one's eyes/face out of embarrassment

I had a very close friend. We were too young; once he was supposed to come to me so that we could both go to a soccer field along with so many other friends. He was standing by our building door that ...
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2answers
21 views

(Behind), (behind them), (behind their back)

I wonder which choice works naturally and idiomatically in my scenario? When those genocidal and bloodthirsty warlords attacked, they burned everywhere, killed many innocent people and ruined many ...
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2answers
26 views

The remaining parts of an ancient city

What do you call the remaining parts of an ancient city like what you see within the picture that sometimes archeologists discover and unearth? 1- Remnants of a city 2- Remainings of a city ...
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2answers
40 views

Using tie/knot as a verb in a sentence

Tie (verb): to fasten together two ends of a piece of string or other long, thin material, or to (cause to) hold together with a long, thin piece of string, material, etc. Example: - Could you tie ...
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2answers
23 views

<Ordinary> or <Common>

Please consider the meanings of the two words "common" and "ordinary": Common: 1.belonging equally to, or shared alike by, two or more or all in question: common property; common interests. 2....
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1answer
23 views

A use of <usual> and <always>

Please consider these examples: The flower seller was in his usual place. I’ll put the keys in the usual place. In my sentences, we say usual place, meaning that something or someone is ...
1
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1answer
22 views

<Hopeless>, <Discouraged> and <Disappointed>

Let's assume that a person feels really down after a failure and now he's severely suffering from the situation they're in. How each sentences below changes the meaning of my context? Be hopeful ...
1
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1answer
22 views

Comparing “Path”, “Route”, “Road”, “Way”

Which choice below sounds natural to be used in my sentence as a way of encouraging a young person who has given up hope? Let's say you want to tell them that they have a long way ahead and lots of ...
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1answer
13 views

Some ways to encourage a discouraged person

Which choices below do not sound natural when you want to say someone "be hopeful" using a hopegiving sentence: Don't lose your hope. Don't be hopeless. Why Ngram doesn't show any ...
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2answers
18 views

<As usual>, <As ever> and <As always>

I wonder how should I distinguish between the three idioms: As usual As ever As always While dictionaries say: (As usual) in a way that often happens normally and is expected or exists ...
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1answer
19 views

<Original/genuine/authentic> painting

I know the words "genuine" and "original" and "authentic": Authentic --> real or true Genuine--> not fake Original--> the first copy of something But I have no idea how they can be ...
1
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1answer
26 views

What is the difference of 'sat on' and 'sat in'?

According to ngram "he sat in" has slightly more frequency than "he sat on", but both are used, so they must be grammatically correct. Could they be used interchangeably without different meaning? ...
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2answers
24 views

evocative vs evocable

According to dictionary: evocable - capable of being evoked ­ evocative - tending or serving to evoke ­ To me, their meaning is so similar that I can't see a real difference. For ...
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1answer
48 views

Is a “creep” good, or bad, or both? [closed]

I have found these two definition of "creep" and would like to know is a "creep" considered good, or bad, or both? creep someone who tries to make someone more important like them by being very ...
0
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1answer
34 views

“Nectar” VS “Juice”

What is the difference between the two words nectar and juice? Dictionaries say: Nectar: nectar is also a drink made from some fruits: - Apricot nectar Juice: the liquid that comes from ...
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2answers
23 views

The satisfaction I GOT from vs The satisfaction I FELT from…which is correct?

Which of these two sentences is correct, and why? The satisfaction I got from helping others instigated my interest in the world of medicine. The satisfaction I felt from helping others instigated ...
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1answer
29 views

“Peripheral” Vs “Incidental”

Peripheral: Something that is peripheral is not as important as something else: The book contains a great deal of peripheral detail. Incidental: Less important than the thing something is ...
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2answers
27 views

Are “they” and “them” the same word or two different words?

My question arose after I have completed this quiz: https://www.sporcle.com/games/g/common_english_words (I do use Sporcle a lot). The quiz is amazing and very nice to play. However, a question ...
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1answer
13 views

Diametric vs Diametrical vs Diametral

What are the nuances in the difference between the meanings of these words? When is it okay to consider them interchangeable? In what cases one of them is clearly more valid than the others?
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1answer
36 views

“Accidental” or “incidental”

I need to know whether I can use both words incidental and accidental in the following self-made context without any change in meaning? 1) Such a success cannot be achieved without the active ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Using the word “haphazard”

Using the adjective haphazard you mean "lacking order or purpose; not planned". I need to know if the bold sentence blow makes sense in a natural way within my self-made scenario: After graduation ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Comparing “happen”, “occur” and “take place”

I need to know how a native speaker would fill in the blanks using the proper choice from among my provided items: "take place", "happen" and "occur"? Please let me know about my take on each ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Occurrence vs Happening

Please let me know if the word "occurrence"can be replaced with "happening" in the following example without any change in meaning? If not, please let me know about the reason. Dictionary definitions ...
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1answer
19 views

Children need (advice / guidance)

Editted: I wonder which choice does not work in the following scenario: Children can also be made more vulnerable than other people because of their young age and dependence on adults, so they ...
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1answer
15 views

Genuine/original pieces of clothing, accessories and devices

What word cannot be used to identify whether a piece of clothing or an accessory or a device is not fake? I know the words "genuine" and "original" and somehow I am aware how they differ in meaning. ...