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Questions tagged [word-difference]

For questions about differences in meaning or use between related words or words with similar meanings

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14 views

“From (all/any/the financial) aspect” vs “From (all/any/the financial) facet”

Edited: The word "aspect" means: One part of a situation, problem, subject, etc. On the other had, "facet" means: One part of a subject, situation, etc. that has many parts So it seems ...
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1answer
30 views

The meeting could not take place as originally planned and we agreed to a new date, two weeks later [on hold]

The meeting could not take place as originally planned and we agreed to a new date, two weeks later Which statements are true? 1) The meeting was cancelled. 2) The meeting was delayed. 3) The ...
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2answers
26 views

“Practicable” versus “Feasible”

For me, and based on dictionaries, both of the words "practicable" and "feasible" mean the same thing. I wonder if I'm mistaken, provide me with some examples where one of them is preferred over the ...
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1answer
8 views

Difference between “several” and “several of”

I stumbled upon this while reading a detective novel An Innocent Client by Scott Prat. Below is the phrase in context. Landers ate lunch there two or three times a month. Even now and then he'd ...
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2answers
41 views

When somebody makes you sustain a financial loss

What verb do you use about the action of someone who causes you to suffer from a financial loss. I.e. 1) imagine you know nothing of cars and someone who pretends to be knowledgeable about ...
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3answers
22 views

“Economic recession” Vs “Economic downturn”

How do these terms differ: Recession is a period when the economy of a country is not successful and conditions for business are bad: - The country is sliding into the depths of (a) recession ...
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3answers
30 views

We have vs We do have

What is the difference between We have and We do have? Has it same meaning or different meanings?
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2answers
25 views

What's the difference between “to deny a request” and “to decline it”?

From time to time I have seen my requests about miscellaneous services denied (as shown to me by text), and on Meta we have "status-declined" as a tag to bug reports and feature requests. How is it ...
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1answer
34 views

Difference between mean and tight

I'm trying to guess if an English speaker says mean or tight when you are talking about a person who don't like to spend their own money. Do you use different words depending on the friendship with ...
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1answer
25 views

“Advantage” VS “Virtue”

According to the dictionary claims, Advantage means: A good feature that makes something better than similar things. And also, virtue means: a. The virtue of something is an advantage or ...
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1answer
56 views

“Except” and “Besides” when they are interchangeable

When I got in, there were four people in the room, besides me. When I got in, there were four people in the room, except me. Are both examples above saying that there are five people?
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1answer
27 views

Diagnose VS Recognize

In the following context, I wonder if you could let me know which choice doesn't work and why: When my doctor couldn't ........... my disease after a week of treatment he said to go to better ...
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2answers
26 views

“Bundle up” or “wear warm clothing”

Dictionaries say that "bundle up" means "put on warm clothing" or "dress warmly". I need to know how do the sentences below differ in meaning: It's very cold outside. Bundle up. It's very cold ...
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20 views

Private “tutoring” or “tuition”

I need to know whether someone can offer private tutoring "[gerund form] or it is more natural to say they offer privet tuition? Ngram shows that the gerund form exists, but I don't find anything ...
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2answers
34 views

“Determine” Vs “Specify”

In the following self-made examples can use both "specify" and "determine and as far as I know and dictionaries give some instances, I guess they are interchangeable in this sense. I just need your ...
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1answer
27 views

CLOZE TEST: Need help with words' meanings!

Extreme water events like this are dramatic reminders of the power of the wind. It's one part of the weather we generally don't give a second thought to in Britain but it plays a vital role in ...
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1answer
32 views

“Explain” VS “Describe”

I wonder how the following verbs differ the meaning of my self-made sentence: Let me explain to you how it happened. Let me describe to you how it happened. To me, both of the sentences ...
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2answers
18 views

“Put together” vs “Assemble”

As you know, the verb "assemble" means: "to make something by joining separate parts together"; also the phrasal verb "put together" means: "to put the parts of something in the correct places and ...
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2answers
22 views

“Gather”, “Gather together”, “Get together” and “Assemble”

Edited: I need to ask about the following sentence where I doubt whether both verbs make sense and can be used interchangeably or not: 1) Every year all people ............ in this square at ...
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1answer
14 views

Using the words “collision” ,“clash” and “strike”

Which one of the following verbs can make a better sense in my self-made sentence and sounds more natural: It is believed that the ................ of an asteroid or a meteor to The Earth has ...
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1answer
19 views

Using the single verb “extinguish” in modern English

I wonder if in the following context I can substitue the bold sentence with the further sentence of mine: In the 1980s, father-and-son scientists Luis and Walter Alvarez discovered in the ...
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0answers
23 views

“Few” after possessive adjectives: “He sold his few books”

When you say: He sold his few books. Does it mean he sold a few books or he sold few books? If it means few books, should I say: He sold his some books. to mean he actually had some books?
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1answer
21 views

Someone who enjoys competing with others

I wonder what do you call a person who is interested in completeling with others in every aspect of their life; (uch an individual might love doing that). They can be either deceitful and act ...
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0answers
20 views

A comparison between the verbs “escape”, “flee”, “run away” and get away" [on hold]

I need to discover which choises work in these sentences and which options do not work naturally in thses sentences? To me, they all work and have quite similar meanings in the manner that I can use ...
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1answer
34 views

“Transitory” Vs “Elusive”

We know that: Elusive means: "difficult to describe, find, achieve, or remember." And also: Transitory means: "lasting for only a short time." Now please let me know which choice works better ...
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1answer
24 views

A comparison between “escape to”, “flee to”, “run away to” and “get away to”

I need to know if all the four verbs work properly withing the following sentence? If yes, then they mean the same thing in everyday speech? And if they have some semantic nuances, how do they differ ...
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0answers
25 views

(Go/carry/keep) on VS continue [duplicate]

According to the dictionaries, these four verbs have so many practical overlaps as well as some semantic nuances which restricts my understanding as a non-native speaker to use the natural verb in ...
3
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2answers
268 views

If current results hold, Man City would win PL title

The line under the scoreboard says If current results hold, Man City would win PL title. I am totally confused about why would is there. It describes a particular condition (winning the game) and ...
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0answers
28 views

Comparing the verbs “go on”, “carry on”, “continue” and “keep on” [on hold]

Please help me to fill in the following blanks where I'm struggling to find the fitting verbs in each case. According to the dictionaries, these four verbs have so many practical overlaps as well as ...
0
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1answer
28 views

A comparison between the verbs “To put in order” and “tidy (up)”

Dictionaries acknowledge that to put (something) in order means: "to clean or tidy something". Also, tidy (up) something means: "to make a place or a collection of things tidy." Now, I need to know ...
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1answer
15 views

“Tidy” vs “Neat”

According to the dictionary definitions: Tidy: having everything ordered and arranged in the right place, or liking to keep things like this. Neat: tidy, with everything in its place. ...
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0answers
33 views

“Take” vs “take away”

To take away can mean: to get a particular message or piece of information from something you read or are told. Example: What I took away from his talk is that going to university is ...
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2answers
26 views

“Dirtiness” and “being dirty” [closed]

To me, both the concepts "dirtiness" and "being dirty" mean exactly the same thing and I have always used them interchangeably; but I have my doubts now whether I can switch between them whenever I ...
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0answers
10 views

“Cleanness” or “cleanliness” or “to be clean”

For me, all the three concepts: "Cleanliness", "cleanness" and "being clean" Mean exactly the same thing and I used to think that I could always use them interchangeably; now I've found ...
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1answer
35 views

What is the difference between “favour of” and “favour from” in the given sentences?

I need favour of her. I need favour from her. in the sentence whether I should use "favour of or "favour from". Do they will mean exactly the same?
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1answer
13 views

room temperature water or room-temperature

Do we say 'room temperature water'? Is the phrase 'room temperature' an adjective? Do we use this with a hyphen? Which of the following is correct? I like to drink room temperature water. I like to ...
1
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1answer
51 views

“WHAT do you want to be?” vs “WHO do you want to be?”

I came across this What do you want to be when you grow up? [...] Are you right now who you want to be? and the first sentence sounds weird to my English learner's ear. Specifically, I am ...
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1answer
29 views

Thank you for (spending / putting / taking) your time

I wonder if you could let me know which one of the listed sentences below is more appropriate for thanking someone when the spend some time to help you? Is there any uncommon or unidiomatic sentence ...
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1answer
44 views

Comparing the nouns “aid” and “help”

Please have a look the following self-made sentences and help me to find out whether any of the items sounds unnatural. If yes, then why? I need to come to a conclusion based on the probable ...
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2answers
65 views

A comparison between the verbs “aid”, “help”, “assist” and “give a hand” [closed]

Having a look on dictionaries, the following sentences can be made, but I don't know whether they are natural using each verb or not. Please have a look on them and let me know whether there is a way ...
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1answer
25 views

A comparison betwen “aid”, “help” and “relief”

I have had a look on the definitions of these three similar words in dictionaries, but unfortunately I cannot differentiate between them! For more clarification I have provided you with a sentence ...
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1answer
17 views

“Get around” VS “Go around”

To me both of the phrasal verbs: get around somewhere and go around somewhere mean to go to different places or to go from one place to another in a place i.e. London. But the only difference that ...
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0answers
10 views

A (dull, gloomy, dismal) person

How the following similar sentences differ in meaning: He is a dull person. [to me it sounds just boring; also according to a context it can mean sad and hopeless too] He is a gloomy ...
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2answers
26 views

What would you call anything that you achieve without any try

What do you call something like wealth, property etc. that you win or receive or somehow achieve from someone or somewhere unexpectedly and with no try? I know the word windfall which is can only be ...
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2answers
22 views

Weather will (go bad/deteriorate/spoil or…)

Please suppose you're going to take a travel in your car for a long distance tomorrow and you are worried if you will have a bad weather tomorrow. (Today you're having a nice weather). I was wondering ...
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1answer
9 views

The universal term for the weather organization

What do you usually call the organization which forcasts the weather during the week days? I know two terms: Meteorological organization {it sounds a bit technical to me and I doubt if people ...
3
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2answers
246 views

Desolate vs deserted [closed]

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between "desolate" and "deserted" (used to describe a place)?
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1answer
30 views

“Mourning”, “whining” and “wailing”

I cannot differentiate the listed words below: Wail to make a long, high cry, usually because of pain or sadness, or to make a sound like this Mourn To feel or express deep sadness, esp....
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1answer
47 views

“Yowl”, “howl” and “wail”

What is the difference between the synonymous words: yowl, howl and wail? Based on dictionaries, these too similar words overlap in meaning as below: Howl 1) If a dog or wolf howls, it makes a ...
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3answers
26 views

“Skinny”, “Scrawny” and “Bony”

According to the dictionaries, the words Skinny, Scrawny and Boney mean so close that I cannot distinguish between them. They all mean very thin and even showing bones! I was wondering if you could ...