We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Questions tagged [word-in-context]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
54
votes
4answers
13k views

“[I]t literally scared her to death” - Why is “I” in brackets?

Quoting a phrase from an article: Grubb’s first overdose was on Aug. 15, 2015. Her mother found her blue on her bedroom floor, a tourniquet around her arm and a needle next to her. Paramedics ...
33
votes
3answers
11k views

What does IKEA-like mean?

I found the text below in a website and I'm trying to understand the meaning of IKEA in the context: Technically, this kit allows you to follow an IKEA-like manual and put together a guitar, ...
18
votes
1answer
5k views

Help me understand the word “Doggo” in this image

I study English, I like it very much. Help to figure out. "Doggo" it is not clear in the context. Please explain how a native English speaker understand this phrase. Maybe we can replace the word "...
17
votes
6answers
3k views

The difference between 'extra chair' and 'spare chair'

I was talking to one of my friend about a student who came in to our class and took an extra chair away. My friend corrected me and said, "you mean a spare chair?" and I replied, "yes we have so many ...
11
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the difference between “run over” and “run under” in the context of car accident?

In a post in Straight Dope Message Board, run over and run under are used in car accident context, but I can't differentiate them. In my understanding, in both cases the victim is hit directly by the ...
10
votes
5answers
2k views

How to talk about the act of pressing the cancel button once the conversation on mobile is over?

At the end of the talk, people press cancel button to cut the call. What is that act called? If it were a land line phone, we could have said: She has put the phone down (?) Scene: My child was ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

How does one use a rostrum?

...or is there a word or expression more common than 'rostrum'? When you want to give a speech, and there's this in the room: ...where do you stand? At, on, behind a rostrum? Ngram was quite ...
9
votes
2answers
3k views

“Zilch. Every. Dang. Year.” - what does it mean?

I found Zilch. Every. Dang. Year. in A bittersweet farewell to the Obamas at their last White House Easter egg roll. Zilch is nothing at all What does Zilch. Every. Dang. Year. mean in this article?
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What do you see if you enter 'clip' in the Windows 10 Search Box or Cortana?

I thought I made a mistake and inputed the word 'clip' in the search box and I saw that I hit the snipping tool which was really what I wanted. But the question arises: Are clip and snip in this ...
8
votes
4answers
857 views

Is this use of the expression “long past” correct?

None of those boys could be considered a good soccer player actually, but it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball long past the corner. Does this phrase make any sense? I'm trying ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the meaning of the expression 'nice to wheat you'?

According to OxfordDictionaries.com, the word 'wheat' can be only a noun. However, in a scene from the television cartoon Rick and Morty, it was used as a verb in the phrase "nice to wheat you". What ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

What does the phrase 'waking thoughts' mean?

Passage: Suddenly he was standing on short springy turf, on a summer evening when the slanting rays of the sun gilded the ground. The landscape that he was looking at recurred so often in his ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Question: “Are you hungry?” Answer: “I feel like eating.”

I read a conversation book in which the answer for the question "Are you hungry?" was: "I feel like eating." My question if this phrase of "feeling like" when talking about a normal situation in ...
4
votes
4answers
508 views

The use of “I” and “we” used in the same sentence and other questions

First of all I'm not even sure if the sentence I'm using as an example is correctly formulated. Even a seach for "I was at the church last Sunday" on Google gave me only three results so I think it's ...
4
votes
2answers
800 views

Puddle vs Pool in different cases

I wish to know two things here: Is the word puddle still in use? In which case do we call water on the ground a puddle and in which a pool? Except for the big swimming pools those don't count. How ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

a book “said”…? Which expression do you use when you refer from books?

A few weeks ago, one of my friend and I talked about tomorrow's traveling course. I said, "my guidebook said a city walking course." But books can't say anything. So I thought "said" was a wrong ...
4
votes
1answer
562 views

What does this “as it might prove” mean?

This is from the book Far Above Rubies by George MacDonald. It reads... The narrative, such as it might prove, was at length finished, and had been read, at least with pleasure and hope, by his ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

The use of “since” in “The Empire had long since fallen to the Barbarians”

Although Justinian’s reign started inauspiciously, he still enjoyed astonishing success. Rome and Western Empire had long since fallen to the Barbarians. But he and Theodora set out to recover the ...
4
votes
2answers
30k views

Usage of 'increase in' and 'increase of'

People with A exhibited a significant increase in proteins A, B and C. XYZ is an event resulting in the decrease in protein C. A is increased in people with PQR. This increase of (in) A is ...
4
votes
2answers
121 views

How to understand the word “free” in this sentence: “a geyser of death blasting mole bodies free of the planet”?

From A mole of moles, I meet this sentence: Plumes of hot meat and bubbles of trapped gases like methane—along with the air from the lungs of the deceased moles—periodically rise through the mole ...
4
votes
1answer
560 views

Case of “more” and “else”

I know that both "more" and "else" can be used in the meaning of "besides". Well, at least I think so. Here are examples: I have told you all I know. What else do you want with me? I have told you ...
3
votes
2answers
182k views

How to reply to “I hope you have enjoyed your holiday”?

If someone told me: I hope you have enjoyed your holiday. What will be the best way to thank him/her? (in a full sentence) The followings are what I can think of: Thanks for the kind words. ...
3
votes
2answers
742 views

Can we use “yet” in conditional (and affirmative) sentence?

I knew that: yet should be used in negative sentences and questions. still should be used in affirmative sentences. We can use yet in affirmative sentences containing this pattern:have yet to ...
3
votes
2answers
81 views

Where should “kind of” be placed?

Is it It is a disruptive kind of move. or It is a kind of disruptive move.
3
votes
1answer
118 views

“Contemptuous bastard”, doesn't it sound rude? [closed]

I've come across 'the grim reaper is gone' and been surprised to encounter that they have put contemptuous bastard in the article: "This contemptuous bastard of a man has overseen “welfare reforms”...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Low values vs Small values

I would like to describe the indication of some numerical index, let us say x. I would like to say that if x << n then this indicate positive impact however x >> n this indicate negative ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the meaning of “for” in “the weather forecast is for sun”

The weather forecast is for sun, with intermittent showers. I gather it wants to say "the weather forecast tells people it's sunny with intermittent showers". But I couldn't understand this part "for ...
3
votes
1answer
28 views

Meaning of “in the open”

What's the meaning of the expression "in the open" in the phrase below: This is partly because fear is uncommon and short-lived in the open. The page where I found this sentence is: dictionary....
3
votes
1answer
179 views

Can I use “human intervention” in this context? Are there better alternatives?

Applying self-organized Multiagent systems in the industry can lower the necessity of human intervention, which can imply a signicant reduction in costs. Please note that I want to emphasize that the ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

What’s the difference? [closed]

Is there a difference between “no place to go” and “no place left to go”? e.g. There is no place to hide. There is no place left to hide.
2
votes
1answer
124 views

How to ask people to help after you have filled in a wrong number

Here is the situation. I was browsing some clothes on a web sites. Some time later, I decided to make the order for some lace ones. So, I was then asked to fill in the order form. I might be sleepy ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

pacing the room

What's the meaning of "pace the room"? On Cambridge Dictionary pace means "the speed at which someone or something moves, or with which something happens or changes", but what relation this can get ...
2
votes
4answers
5k views

A neutral word for someone who behaves differently from everyone else

What do you call a person, that, given a particular social context, behaves or is led to behave differently from all others, perhaps ending up being regarded as a strange person and/or punished or ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Meaning of “soul-sapping”

The sentence below is from the article Posters berating homeless beggars as frauds? I know how far this is from truth Perhaps hard-pressed officials adopt these tactics when interacting with ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Describing something which exist in one month and doesn’t exist in the next!

I wanted to describe to my friend a situation where i wanted to mention that something exist in January, but doesn’t exist in February, exist in March, but not in April, exist in June but not in July, ...
2
votes
2answers
71 views

In Haruki Murakami's “Barn Burning”, I don't understand a quote involving the phrase “a priori” which I also only barely understand

Here's the quote: “I was married, but that didn’t matter, either. She seemed to consider things like age and income and family to be of the same a priori order as shoe size and vocal pitch and ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Should I use “key” or “a/the key”?

The word key is both an adjective and a noun meaning something is important. But which is the preferred one to use in terms of different territories? For example, should I say The hint is key. or ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

What word is better to use here (word/talk/speech)?

It's a conversation between 3 people and I have doubts what to use for the bold part in text. A was telling what he was interested in and giving us some information B was trying to stop him ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

Difference between would/will. Are they interchangeable in certain contexts?

Words wouldn't be enough to describe my love for you. Words won't be enough to describe my love for you. Are Wouldn't/ Won't interchangeable in the above construction? What's the difference in ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Are you the one who called?” or “Are you the one that called?”

How does one decide whether to use who or that? In the title example: The correct pronoun is who. The correct pronoun is that. Either is correct. They're interchangeable. It depends on the context.
2
votes
1answer
252 views

Does “hereby” sound too serious at the end of a letter to the visa office?

Well, I had to write a letter to the visa office explaining the reasons why I apply for the visa and what my background is in a brief fashion. And at the end of the letter, I used this sentence: I ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“All of the …” or “ All the … ”?

I am a bit confused about these two forms For example : John reads books all of the time/all the time All the students/All of the students have participated in march against smoking in the ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

cheery / cheerily pick any charges

From NPR: DRATEL: You start from the acceptable resolution for both sides, and then you work backward to achieve that. If you start from the ground up I don't think you'd get very far because ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

The adverb “reasonably” can be about the level of language knowledge?

The adverb "reasonably" can be about the level of language knowledge? For example, can I say "He speaks English reasonably", meaning he speaks in a level he can speak and understand the most of the ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

Recall Vs. remember

In this context recall and remember would be the same? "I recall myself when I was 5 years old in my family house, it was an amazing time for me". "I remember myself when I was 5 years old ...
2
votes
1answer
134 views

What does “cloaked by NDA” mean in this context?

While reading an article about web design, I came across the sentence about the NDA that confused me. Please help to clear out the meaning. "That was an open ended brief, and it led to some of the ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Meaning of today in: How can I help you, today?

I was reading this post, What should we greet a person at 10 o'clock in the night?, on ELL. You could use both. "Tonight" would refer to the current time of day, but "today" could be seen as to ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

Why is the prefix repeated in brackets in the word “((meta-)meta-)meta-design”?

While reading an article about web design, I came across the following phrase — "((meta-)meta-)meta-design systems". I'm well aware what meta-design is, but have problems understanding the usage of "(...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Is “he be let off the hook” a complete sentence? [closed]

From this article, Fallon is not Letterman, and he never will be, nor does he seem to want to be. But that doesn’t mean he be let off the hook for humanizing a well-documented xenophobic, ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Can I use the verb 'forgo' in this context?

Cambridge says: forgo (v.) to not have or do something enjoyable: I shall have to forgo the pleasure of seeing you this week. So, can I use the verb forgo in this context? For example, if one ...