Questions tagged [word-request]

This tag is for questions seeking a word that fits a meaning. Please demonstrate why you expect the word to exist in English. For example you could tell us a word that means the same in another language. Please use a bilingual dictionary and include the result of your research. Please include a sample sentence demonstrating how the word would be used. If you actually seek a phrase, or don't care, see the "phrase-request" tag.

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2
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1answer
33 views

A good synonym for hiding someone's neck

When it's cold outside or when you are in shame, someone might hide their neck as if a tortoise retracting it to its shell, but what verb or expression can I use to describe to action. Ex: When ...
0
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2answers
61 views

What is the common negative adjective that expresses a woman or girl who tried too much to show to others that she is attractive and pretty?

What is the common negative adjective that expresses a woman or girl who tried too much to show to others that she is attractive and pretty, for example, she might shake her hips when walking, put on ...
0
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0answers
32 views

goes on to infinity?

There's a doll inside that doll and inside that doll there's a doll and inside that doll there's a doll and it goes on to infinity. There's a doll inside that doll and inside that doll there's ...
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2answers
131 views

Word request - What is the word to describe a line or sentence that you can sing

I wonder if there is any words in English to describe a line which you can sing. The line (or sentence) doesn't come from a song. So for example, saying "a line from a song" is not correct.
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1answer
38 views

Drowning or something else?

If you kill someone by submerging their head in water, do you call it killing by drowning or something else?
0
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0answers
24 views

Is there a word or phrase for “weeds replacing non-weeds”?

Is there a word or phrase for "weeds replacing non-weeds"? The only way I can see someone express such idea is with the phrase "weeds invaded crop/field/etc.", but I am pretty sure there was another ...
0
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1answer
35 views

How would one describe physically pressable keyboard keys in a single word?

I was thinking about movable/moving keys, but it's possible to confuse that with keys that can be removed from the keyboard and placed on a different one, or in a different position, I'm afraid. "...
2
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7answers
69k views

Different idiom to “there are two sides to every coin”

There was a similar question posted a couple of months ago, but the details of what that person was looking for are a bit different from mine. I am looking for another saying that describes you being ...
16
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4answers
8k views

How can I say “a period of four months” in one word?

If I want to say the first three months of the year in one word, I would say "the first quarter". Which word should I use to refer to a period of four months?
4
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3answers
983 views

How to blame bad luck?

What is the fixed expression which can be said by an unlucky person to show their disappointment after a bad outcome / happening in English? In Russian people have the slang: "ёлки-палки" which is a ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Is it okay to say “the piece” when you don't know what it is called?

A laminate floor is made by sticking many layers of planks together. Over the time, the glue may wear off and makes these layers break and split open. "The piece" may appear on the floor as shown in ...
0
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1answer
15 views

Is it idiomatic to say “There are some chips on the wall”?

chip (n) 4 MARK a small hole or mark on a plate, cup etc where a piece has broken off chip in There’s a chip in this bowl. The edge of a wall is very prone to get broken since hard objects ...
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1answer
26 views

How much is the (probability / likelihood) of something?

How do you normally ask about the probability / likelihood of something in English? Example: The number of artificial satellites is increasing and the gravitational force is acting up on them. But ...
0
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0answers
18 views

What's the alternative to “laugh track” for particular phrases?

What's the alternative to "laugh track" for particular phrases? For example: He repeatedly played "I choose you Pikachu" track on his laptop, which annoyed me. It doesn't sound right, but I am ...
0
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1answer
21 views

What's the word for moving inside a river upstream or downstream?

What's the word for moving inside a river upstream or downstream? I thought about sailed, but I am not sure that's a good verb. What if we are on a small boat for 1 person? Also, what about the ...
0
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5answers
162 views

Adverbs of emphasis in the spoken language

There are some adverbs of emphasis in the spoken language that I find really interesting. Examples : Badly, Awfully, Terribly = To a great degree. (I wanted it so badly.) , (It's not terribly ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Verifying that workers put in the right amount of hours at work

I'm developing an application for remote workers to be able to check in and out of work and I've stumbled upon a concept I don't know how to translate into worker. A worker's manager is supposed to ...
0
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1answer
19 views

Idiom for from difficult situation to worse situation

Is there an idiom that we can refer to say " going through from tough times to tougher(worst) times" My own creation: From boiling oil to fire. Something like this.
0
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2answers
59 views

What should I call a supermarket's sales person?

I wonder which choice is the natural one among the options below? A: Did you buy all the items within the list? B: Yea, just I was short on cash, so I (became indebted to / owed) the ............
-1
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1answer
23 views

What's the word for starting a contest?

What's the word for starting a contest? Not really starting, but financing it and being legally liable to award the winner. I can't think of a verb for that. Example: The company organized and ___ ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Is it ok to say “to tie your finger with a rubber band”, “to wrap a rubber band around your finger”?

tie [transitive] to attach or hold two or more things together using string, rope, etc.; to fasten somebody/something with string, rope, etc. tie something + adv./prep. She tied the ...
-1
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1answer
56 views

We say “After you put the shirt on, you are wearing it”. Would you say “After you lay your head on the pillow, you are laying your head on it”?

put something + adv./prep. to move something into a particular place or position Put the cases down there, please. Did you put sugar in my coffee? Put your hand up if you need more ...
1
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1answer
29 views

The name for a sentence that uses a word that can be a noun or a verb both ways: “We swing on the swing”

We swing on the swing. Glue( to use glue) with Glue. Juice (to squeeze to make juice) to make juice. What is the name for these kind of sentences that the noun and verb are the same?
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1answer
44 views

Is there have rhymes for silver, purple, month, ninth, pint, wolf, opus, dangerous, marathon and discombobulate? [closed]

I read on internet that Rhymes for Words That Have No Rhyme. That silver, purple, month, ninth, pint, wolf, opus, dangerous, marathon and discombobulate. And mostly for Orange have no rhyme. ...
0
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0answers
35 views

What is the interface between a floor and a wall called: a corner, too?

corner: a part of something where two or more sides, lines or edges join the four corners of a square I hit my knee on the corner of the table. Write your address in the top right-hand ...
1
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1answer
27 views

What it it called when you turn a lid to close a jar?

There's a jar, there's a thread on the top of the jar. What verb do you use when you take a lid, place it to the top of a jar, and then turn it clockwise until it tightly fits the jar? What do you do ...
0
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4answers
502 views

A food that doesn't have enough salt

In English we use the adjective "saltless" to describe a food with "no salt"; but I need to know whether there is a particular adjective for a food which doesn't have "enough" salt? (i.e. ...
2
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1answer
43 views

Word used for Royal title change

Presumably Queen Elizabeth 1st has only been called that title since our present Queen came to the throne, taking the title Queen Elizabeth 2nd (presumably in her lifetime Queen Elizabeth 1st would ...
1
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1answer
20 views

How to say “that thing distorts your effort”?

When you don't have a life goal, you will set a small goal every day, which will distort your effort and waste your time. I wasn't able to find "distort/distribute your efforts" used by any ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Do justice to the film's name

Example: The director added a scene with a dinosaur to do justice to the film's name (Jurassic Park Armageddon). It was the only scene with a dinosaur funnily enough. I am not sure if I am ...
1
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1answer
377 views

What's the meaning and usage of “One such proposal is FOR” and “The concept is OF”?

Could you guys please explain about these sentences? One such proposal is FOR the vertical farm. The concept is OF multi-storey buildings I can't understand about FOR and OF in these sentences....
0
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0answers
19 views

Is there an idiom for “justifying a title of a film”?

Is there an idiom for "justifying a title of a film"? I am pretty sure there was an expression for that, but I completely forgot what it was. For example: The director added a scene to the film to ...
8
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3answers
35k views

What do you call the guy who parks cars?

What is the official name of the guy in the restaurant who takes the car from the customers and then returns the cars back to them when they finish visiting the restaurant? "parking guy"?
1
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1answer
23 views

What it is called when a TV channel is no longer available?

When broadcasting of some TV channel is cut off (for example, as part of censorship), what do you call that action? 'TV channel is [past participle]' — fill the blank, please. Can I say, for instance, ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What do you call the act of changing camera?

In films, you sometimes have the camera focusing on someone's face and then switching to a camera filming something else from a different angle. What do you call the act of switching camera in a film?
6
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10answers
2k views

“A halved Pinang”; What is the equivalent expression in English?

"Like a halved Pinang" is an expression in my native language to compare the appearance of two persons who are alike/very similar/like a twin. Note: Pinang (lat. Area catechu) is a species of palm ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

How can you describe someone's height?

I know you can and, usually, do simply say 'tall' or 'short'. But what if I want to say it differently: 'of [some word] stature'. What adjectives should I use to make it sound idiomatic? 'Short'/'tall'...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

I am looking for some words other than “Unemployed” to make my sentences more understandable

Peter (nickname) is in his late forties. We have been friends for years. He used to be a stay-at-home dad, because he had 3 young daughters. (now they have grown up) He had been doing a few part-time ...
0
votes
2answers
7k views

What's the adjective for a person who cares much?

For example, I want to say to my mum: Oh, I could cook something myself. It's better for you just go in the room and rest after this crazy day you had. Mum... thank you for all, you're so ____. (...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

How to write on an academical essay that a certain professor helped to do it?

What's the common way to write on a academical work / essay / research / thesis / PhD that a certain professor helped me to write it? Would the word "directed" is normal in such context? Directed ...
14
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7answers
8k views

Does “Until when” sound natural for native speakers?

In some languages such as my native languages (Kurdish and Persian), when we want to ask about the exact limit point of time for something, we use two words which are exactly equal to this two words ...
0
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2answers
35 views

Performing movements/motions in order to show-off or attract audience

I was wondering what do you normally call performing some movements / motions which attracts the audience by a motorcycle / bicycle / car / plane or the movements in martial arts (like karate) or in ...
2
votes
3answers
32 views

The stool is under the ladder. You want to remove the stool. Would you say “to take the stool out of/off the ladder”?

A child put a ladder on a stool to get into a play house (see the picture in the link) because the ladder is not tall enough. The stool is not on or in but under the ladder. You want to remove the ...
3
votes
10answers
3k views

Word for something that's always reliable, but never the best?

What do you call something that's always reliable, but that's never the best? Is there a word for it? I am trying to think of something, but there's nothing I can really think of that exactly means ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Would I say “Don't move to the edge of the bed. Move to the middle of it” or “Don't move onto the edge of the bed. Move into the middle of it”?

edge [countable] the outside limit of an object, a surface or an area; the part furthest from the centre I gripped the edge of my desk to steady myself. the first spacecraft to travel to ...
1
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0answers
76 views

in the new setting/surroundings

James and the drunk enter the pizza place. Gordon's there. Gordon: Who's that? James: Oh, that's Shots. Gordon: Shots? James: Yeah. I don't know his real name. I'm not sure he does either. He's ...
2
votes
5answers
1k views

What do we call “three people who united on a person to destroy something he\she has”?

Let's say that X is a girl who has a deal with Y, she would absolutely get many benefits of that deal after it comes to its deadline. However, there's A, B, and C who are three people that hate X and ...
0
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0answers
17 views

How to express “to pressing random different keys or buttons on a mobile phone”?

Your 2-year-old child is holding your mobile phone and he is pressing randomly different keys or buttons on your phone. chaotically adverb /keɪˈɒtɪkli/ /keɪˈɑːtɪkli/ ​in a completely confused ...
0
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0answers
21 views

Would you say “pull the ball open to make all the shapes come out”?

pull [intransitive, transitive] to take hold of something and use force in order to move it or try to move it towards yourself You push and I'll pull. Don't pull so hard or the handle will ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Synonym for “black ant in the heaven”

There is an expression in Malayalam -an Indian language- which translates into English as "a black ant in the heaven". It roughly means an intruder into one's privacy. It is particularly used to refer ...

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