Questions tagged [word-stress]

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How to use the IPA chart?

I've studied in English medium institutions all my life. However, now I'd like to brush up my intonation and pronunciation well before an IELTS exam. I've got the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet)...
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Can we pronounce “can” as /kən/ at the beginning of a sentence?

I know that “can” can be reduced to /kən/ unless it has to be stressed. For example in a sentence like “I believe I can fly” we can say /kən/ instead of /kæn/. My question is, can we do the same thing ...
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Is spondee itself a spondee?

Are both syllables of "spondee" stressed in English? (Are there online dictionaries which record secondary stress? I couldn't find any just now...)
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Which of the function words will be stressed?

Me, and thousands of others in this country like me, are half baked because we were never allowed to complete our schooling. Open our skulls, look in with a pen light and you'll find an old museum of ...
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Are there compound words whose meanings would be changed once there is a change in stress?

I have one true-or-false question. The different stress used in a compound do not usually affect the meaning of the compound. The example used in my book to illustrate why this statement is false is ...
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Syllable stress of plural form of begonias

I am currently studying syllable stress. When I look at the word begonia we can split it into 3 syllables with the stress on 'go'. E.g bih-gohn-yuh. However, the plural form of the word gives me 4 ...
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I did injured from the accident

Consider this sentence: I injured from the accident. For emphasizing that I really injured from the accident, which sentence should I use? 1- I did injure from the accident. 2- I did injured from the ...
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where does the primary stress fall in "save on fares"?

In the phrase "save on fares," does the primary stress fall on "save" or "on"? I'd appreciate your help.
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Why are the pronunciations of 'bicycle' and 'recycle' so different?

It is obvious that both 'recycle' and 'bicycle' have a common element 'cycle'. 'Cycle' on its own is pronounced with a long 'I' sound /aɪ/. 'Cycle' in 'recycle' is pronounced how 'cycle' is normally ...
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primary stress of "Flying Squad" and "Flying Scotsman"

Do you know why the primary stress falls on the "Scotsman" of "Flying Scotsman" but on the first component of "Flying Squad" according to the dictionary? Here are the definitions of the two ...
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primary stress of "flying doctor" and "flying officer"

Do you know why the primary stress falls on the "doctor" of "flying doctor" but on the first component of "flying officer"? In case you don't know what "flying doctor" and "flying officer" refer to, ...
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primary stress of "running repairs" vs. "running order"

I'd like to know why the primary stress falls on the second word of "running repairs" but on the first word of "running order." The computer is in running order. He made running repairs to his ...
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How to pronounce a name you see for the first time?

Could you please tell me how to pronounce a name (interpreted from other languages) for the first time you see it? In English I find it difficult to do so because of the flexible pronunciation of ...
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Which one, "big" or "scary lady", does the speaker want to stress in the below sentence?

In the sentence "there's a big, scary lady...", I hear "scary lady" was said in a flat tone, while "big" was said in a higher tone but it's said quickly so I don't like there's any special emphasis on ...
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In a word, A stressed syllable is unstressed and An unstressed syllable is stressed - Why is that? [closed]

Usually, to stress a syllable we should say it louder, longer and higher in pitch than the rest syllables of a word. However, the following words in these below sentences such as California, talented, ...
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When talking about age, should "YEARS" or "OLD" be stressed in a sentence?

When saying: A lot of them are more than a hundred years old. which word, "years" or "old", should be stressed? And is each stress have a different meaning or not? If it's yes, what are they? ...
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If I'm angry, which word should I stress in "You just walked in without knocking!"?

In the sentence "You just walked in without knocking!", if I want to emphasize that I'm ANGRY about someone NOT KNOCKING the door, Which word, "just", "without" or "knocking", should I stress
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How to stress a word in a sentence? Speak louler and clearly or say higher in pitch?

I can easily find out which word that is stressed in a sentence if it's (1) both said clearly, loudly and said in the highest pitch range of that sentence. But in some cases, the speaker just (2) says ...
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Which word is stressed in this sentence “Sometimes you don't even know…” of the below video?

Some told me different word stresses in a sentence conveys different meanings. So I'm learning to find out where the stress is. If the word is said clearly, powerfully and highest in pitch, then it's ...
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Can "which" be substituted with "that" in the sentence?

The original sentence: In fact, however, it is the untruthful thought which is the more vicious of the two. The above sentence semantically appears to be: In fact, however, the untruthful ...
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The correct stress in "transferring"

Where do I need to put the stress in the word "transferring"? Should it be "tRANsferring" or "transFERring"? CONFUSION: Many dictionaries say that the noun is "tRANsfer" while the verb is "transFER". ...
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Word stress in compound nouns changing their meanings

I’ve learned about word stress and felt confused with the exercise in which there are some compound nouns having the stress in two ways and I have to explain their meanings depending on the stress. ...
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Stress in words like confluence, influence, finance - noun vs verb

I'm looking for a right way to stress words ending in -fluence in American English. There should be a change of stress depending on whether it's used a noun or verb. Also, in "finance" I stress the ...
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Pronunciation of "are"

In these sentences below, can I pronounce the "are"s as /ər/ instead of /ɑr/? I am talking about American English. Sentences: 1) "Problems of most people are not big." 2) "People who smoke ...
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Any tool that can denote the place of stress on words?

Is there any tool that can add the location of words' stress to an English passage? So I can learn and practice word stress in sentences? I mean for example you type (or paste) "New year firework was ...
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The placement of an intensifier put between the syllables of a three- or more syllable word for emphasis

Playing an online lexicogrammar game, I met the word "unbelievable" written with a swear word "f_cking" inserted between the first and second syllables: "un-f_cking-believable". I understand that ...
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Does English language ever use acute accent mark to denote word stress?

I do not mean acutes which denote special letter pronunciation, like in "canapé" or "résumé". I mean solely the acute accent mark which is used to indicate stress, or stressed syllable. For example, ...
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Speech flow with contracted "did"

I'm asking this because I'm curious to know the way native speekers say this: Where did you get this. In this sentence when we contract the "did" in speech do we stress the word that precedes it or ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Stressing teen-numbers when counting in a row

Is it acceptable to stress the second syllable of the numbers when counting them in a row? ThirTEEN, fourTEEN...
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Word Stress and explanation

He telephoned the police yesterday. Conveys the sense that the telephone was used, rather than different medium for communication, such as a personal visit or written (email). Can you show me the ...
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"even" in "Now can you even come up with a decent plan"

I've encountered an even use when reading an article. I don't know what does it stand for in this sentence. I wonder that is even in the sentence below an adverb, an adjective or a verb? And it ...
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Word stress in pick up your toys

When you say "Pick up your toys", do you say "pick" and "up" with the same stress or is "up" stronger/louder? Thanks in advance.
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How to make clear in the speech that a short English vowel is stressed?

I'll try now to explain. Let us take the word Berlin (name of the capital of Germany). It is pronounced [bɜːˈlɪn] or [bɝːˈlɪn] (I followed this link). In any of two cases, the first vowel is long but ...
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55 votes
3 answers
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What is the correct pronunciation of "the"?

The is sometimes pronounced "tha" (/ðə/) or "thi" (/ðiː/). Which is the correct pronunciation of this word? Are both correct and used interchangeably at specific places? If the ...
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Fatima: different ways of pronunciation [closed]

How should the feminine name Fatima be pronounced? Which syllable should be stressed? (I know that sometimes it is pronounced as Fat - i - ma, with the second syllable stressed.)
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Executable, executor: correct way to stress syllables

Google, when searching for executable define or executor define shows that second syllable is stressed, i.e. exEcutable, exEcutor. Speech on http://www.thefreedictionary.com/executable suggests that ...
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Which construction is correct? Make the choice of wisdom or make the choice with wisdom ?

which construction is grammatically correct? Make the choice of wisdom or make the choice with wisdom?
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Which syllable do you stress in the word <forward> as a *verb* [closed]

When you use forward as a verb, which syllable is stressed? (forward vs forward) I forwarded the email as soon as I read it This button forwards the message.
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What steps can you take ~ vs What steps you can take?

The speaker said on a video about relief tips: You then wanna formulate an action plan. What steps can you take to start to address your worry, and I guarantee you that as soon as you start ...
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1 answer
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Main stress in 'person specifications'

They use job descriptions and person specifications. What this sentence means and whether it's logical is beyond the point. My question is the following: What happens to the stress in the word '...
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"Substantival" - doesn't fit the normal stress paradigm

According to this website, the rule for stress for words that end in -al is to stress the ante-penultimate syllable. For substantival (sub-stan-ti-val), that should render "sub-STAN-ti-val", but ...
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1 answer
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How do you read 0.1 and 0.24 and 1 4/5 aloud in American English?

0.1 0.24 1 4/5 How do you read them and is there any differences in American and British?
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2 votes
1 answer
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Sentence stress: "It was awful."

I would like to know the normal pattern of sentence stress for this sentence: It was awful. Here is my idea: The stress is on the first syllable of the adjective awful. As long as we don't shift ...
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2 votes
3 answers
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Stress in a sentence. Is "some" a determiner in "Get some sleep"?

As far as I know determiners are not stressed as long as we don't need special emphasis. Am I right? If we don't need special emphasis we only stress the content words "get" and "sleep". Am I right?
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Stress the function word or not?

In the question: "Could you come with me, please?" I would stress the content words "come" and "please" and let the other function words unstressed. I think this is the way we pronounce it as long as ...
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1 answer
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Stress in the question Do you want some coffee?

when we pronounce the question: "Do you want some coffee?" we usually only stress the words "want" and "coffee". Am I right? As far as I know the determiner "some" is unstressed as long as the stress ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Stress in the sentence "I'm proud of you, Hannah"

I know that we usually stress content words in a sentence and unstress function words as long as stress is not shifted for special emphasis. In the sentence, "I'm proud of you, Hannah", I would ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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How do i know if the word is stressed in English?

Yesterday I had a lesson about stressed words. My question is how do i know if the word is stressed or not without listening to the pronunciation? Examples He wants a job that lets them ...
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2 answers
1k views

Word Stress Within a Question

I saw a scene in a TV show where someone asks: What does he do? Here it is: https://youtu.be/lDMOw8c38wU For me, the letter "h" in "he" sounds silent and the whole question phonetically sounds like [...
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3 answers
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Listening and intonation: I need your help

I cut this phrase out of a TV series and uploaded to Youtube: https://youtu.be/vfj-fl1wq74 The phrase "I need your help" phonetically looks like [aɪ nidʒyər hɛlp]. I listened to the video over and ...
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