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Questions tagged [word-stress]

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1answer
20 views

Can “which” be substituted with “that” in the sentence?

The original sentence: In fact, however, it is the untruthful thought which is the more vicious of the two. The above sentence semantically appears to be: In fact, however, the untruthful ...
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1answer
30 views

The correct stress in “transferring”

Where do I need to put the stress in the word "transferring"? Should it be "tRANsferring" or "transFERring"? CONFUSION: Many dictionaries say that the noun is "tRANsfer" while the verb is "transFER". ...
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3answers
72 views

Word stress in compound nouns changing their meanings

I’ve learned about word stress and felt confused with the exercise in which there are some compound nouns having the stress in two ways and I have to explain their meanings depending on the stress. ...
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1answer
86 views

Stress in words like confluence, influence, finance - noun vs verb

I'm looking for a right way to stress words ending in -fluence in American English. There should be a change of stress depending on whether it's used a noun or verb. Also, in "finance" I stress the ...
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2answers
66 views

Pronunciation of “are”

In these sentences below, can I pronounce the "are"s as /ər/ instead of /ɑr/? I am talking about American English. Sentences: 1) "Problems of most people are not big." 2) "People who smoke ...
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0answers
43 views

Any tool that can denote the place of stress on words?

Is there any tool that can add the location of words' stress to an English passage? So I can learn and practice word stress in sentences? I mean for example you type (or paste) "New year firework was ...
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1answer
65 views

The placement of an intensifier put between the syllables of a three- or more syllable word for emphasis

Playing an online lexicogrammar game, I met the word "unbelievable" written with a swear word "f_cking" inserted between the first and second syllables: "un-f_cking-believable". I understand that ...
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1answer
68 views

Does English language ever use acute accent mark to denote word stress?

I do not mean acutes which denote special letter pronunciation, like in "canapé" or "résumé". I mean solely the acute accent mark which is used to indicate stress, or stressed syllable. For example, ...
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2answers
64 views

Speech flow with contracted “did”

I'm asking this because I'm curious to know the way native speekers say this: Where did you get this. In this sentence when we contract the "did" in speech do we stress the word that precedes it or ...
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2answers
99 views

Stressing teen-numbers when counting in a row

Is it acceptable to stress the second syllable of the numbers when counting them in a row? ThirTEEN, fourTEEN...
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1answer
348 views

Word Stress and explanation

He telephoned the police yesterday. Conveys the sense that the telephone was used, rather than different medium for communication, such as a personal visit or written (email). Can you show me the ...
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1answer
33 views

“even” in “Now can you even come up with a decent plan”

I've encountered an even use when reading an article. I don't know what does it stand for in this sentence. I wonder that is even in the sentence below an adverb, an adjective or a verb? And it ...
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1answer
80 views

Word stress in pick up your toys

When you say "Pick up your toys", do you say "pick" and "up" with the same stress or is "up" stronger/louder? Thanks in advance.
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1answer
107 views

How to make clear in the speech that a short English vowel is stressed?

I'll try now to explain. Let us take the word Berlin (name of the capital of Germany). It is pronounced [bɜːˈlɪn] or [bɝːˈlɪn] (I followed this link). In any of two cases, the first vowel is long but ...
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3answers
7k views

What is the correct pronunciation of “the”?

The is sometimes pronounced "tha" or "thi". Which is the correct pronunciation of this word? Are both correct and used interchangeably at specific places? If the second question is correct, please ...
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2answers
315 views

Fatima: different ways of pronunciation [closed]

How should the feminine name Fatima be pronounced? Which syllable should be stressed? (I know that sometimes it is pronounced as Fat - i - ma, with the second syllable stressed.)
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1answer
340 views

Executable, executor: correct way to stress syllables

Google, when searching for executable define or executor define shows that second syllable is stressed, i.e. exEcutable, exEcutor. Speech on http://www.thefreedictionary.com/executable suggests that ...
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1answer
69 views

Which construction is correct? Make the choice of wisdom or make the choice with wisdom ?

which construction is grammatically correct? Make the choice of wisdom or make the choice with wisdom?
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1answer
372 views

Which syllable do you stress in the word <forward> as a *verb* [closed]

When you use forward as a verb, which syllable is stressed? (forward vs forward) I forwarded the email as soon as I read it This button forwards the message.
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2answers
96 views

What steps can you take ~ vs What steps you can take?

The speaker said on a video about relief tips: You then wanna formulate an action plan. What steps can you take to start to address your worry, and I guarantee you that as soon as you start ...
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1answer
83 views

Main stress in 'person specifications'

They use job descriptions and person specifications. What this sentence means and whether it's logical is beyond the point. My question is the following: What happens to the stress in the word '...
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2answers
102 views

“Substantival” - doesn't fit the normal stress paradigm

According to this website, the rule for stress for words that end in -al is to stress the ante-penultimate syllable. For substantival (sub-stan-ti-val), that should render "sub-STAN-ti-val", but ...
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1answer
6k views

How do you read 0.1 and 0.24 and 1 4/5 aloud in American English?

0.1 0.24 1 4/5 How do you read them and is there any differences in American and British?
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1answer
139 views

Sentence stress: “It was awful.”

I would like to know the normal pattern of sentence stress for this sentence: It was awful. Here is my idea: The stress is on the first syllable of the adjective awful. As long as we don't shift ...
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3answers
513 views

Stress in a sentence. Is “some” a determiner in “Get some sleep”?

As far as I know determiners are not stressed as long as we don't need special emphasis. Am I right? If we don't need special emphasis we only stress the content words "get" and "sleep". Am I right?
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1answer
272 views

Stress the function word or not?

In the question: "Could you come with me, please?" I would stress the content words "come" and "please" and let the other function words unstressed. I think this is the way we pronounce it as long as ...
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1answer
131 views

Stress in the question Do you want some coffee?

when we pronounce the question: "Do you want some coffee?" we usually only stress the words "want" and "coffee". Am I right? As far as I know the determiner "some" is unstressed as long as the stress ...
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1answer
1k views

Stress in the sentence “I'm proud of you, Hannah”

I know that we usually stress content words in a sentence and unstress function words as long as stress is not shifted for special emphasis. In the sentence, "I'm proud of you, Hannah", I would ...
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1answer
1k views

How do i know if the word is stressed in English?

Yesterday I had a lesson about stressed words. My question is how do i know if the word is stressed or not without listening to the pronunciation? Examples He wants a job that lets them ...
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2answers
623 views

Word Stress Within a Question

I saw a scene in a TV show where someone asks: What does he do? Here it is: https://youtu.be/lDMOw8c38wU For me, the letter "h" in "he" sounds silent and the whole question phonetically sounds like [...
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3answers
237 views

Listening and intonation: I need your help

I cut this phrase out of a TV series and uploaded to Youtube: https://youtu.be/vfj-fl1wq74 The phrase "I need your help" phonetically looks like [aɪ nidʒyər hɛlp]. I listened to the video over and ...
2
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1answer
117 views

Pronunciation of the question did it work?

"Did it work?" phonetically looks like [dɪd ɪt wɜrk] and after linking it looks like: [dɪ_dɪt wɜrk]. The words "Did" and "it" are linked. I noticed some stress and rise in pitch on "work", of course ...
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3answers
538 views

How to pronounce pick it up in Standard American English

When you pronounce the phrase 'pick it up' as a native speaker, is there any word in it that need to be pronounce higher in pitch with more stress? This is how I pronounce it in American English. I'm ...
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2answers
2k views

Are “Put it on” and “Put them on” phrasal verbs?

Are "put it on" and "put them on" phrasal verbs? I noticed that when Americans pronounce "put them on" they don't say "them". They use the weak form of "them" that sounds like "əm" (schwa sound + m). ...
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1answer
435 views

American English Phonetics. Silent H in What's his name?

Is the letter 'h' silent when Americans pronounce the question 'What's his name?' in casual speech? The question 'What's his name?' phonetically looks like: [wʌts_ɪz neɪm]. I think the words "WHAT'S"...
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1answer
394 views

Which Words Should I Stress?

here are four sentences. I mark the words that I believe are stressed with bold. I'll call you back. I'll call you back in a minute. I'll call you back in a few minutes. I'll call you back as soon as ...
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1answer
2k views

Sentence Stress: I'm sort of busy right now

I heard this phrase in a TV show: "I'm sort of busy right now". You can listen it here (I cut out the phrase): https://clyp.it/4khla44l Phonetically it looks like: [ɑɪm soərt əv bɪzi raɪt naʊ]. The ...
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6answers
42k views

What is the difference between width and breadth?

I have looked this in dictionaries and they both mean: a distance from side to side. I looked in google and the links say that they have a similar meaning with a slight difference but none pf them ...
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1answer
62 views

Stress in the word /telephoning/

Could someone tell me how the word /telephoning/ is pronounced with the stress made clear?